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Archive for the ‘Arthritis’ Category

Otilimab Well Tolerated and May Improve Synovitis in Active Rheumatoid Arthritis – Rheumatology Advisor

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Treatment with otilimab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), is well tolerated, despite optimal exposure, and may improve synovitis in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to study results published in Lancet Rheumatology.

Previous studies have reported that GM-CSF can act as a proinflammatory cytokine and has an important role in a broad range of immune-mediated conditions, making it a valuable therapeutic target in patients with RA. The objective of the current mechanistic phase 2a study was to determine the effect of otilimab on the GM-CSF-chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 17 (CCL17) axis and synovitis in patients with RA.

The multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02799472) included adult patients with RA from across 9 sites in the United States, Poland, and Germany. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either 180 mg of subcutaneous otilimab or placebo. The primary outcome was change over time in 112 biomarkers. Secondary end points included change from baseline in synovitis, osteitis, and erosion assessed by the RA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Scoring (RAMRIS) system, RA MRI Quantitative (RAMRIQ) score, and safety evaluation.

A total of 39 patients with RA who were randomly assigned to receive otilimab (n=28) or placebo (n=11) were included in the final cohort. Weekly subcutaneous injections of otilimab 180 mg or placebo were administered for 5 weeks, then every other week until week 10, followed by a 12-week safety follow-up.

Results showed that mean serum concentrations of the GM-CSF-otilimab complex peaked at week 4 (138.4 ng/L), but reduced from week 6 to 12, with CCL17 concentrations decreasing and then returning to baseline at week 12 (least-squares mean ratios at weeks 2, 4, 6, and 8 were 0.65, 0.68, 0.78, and 0.68, respectively). In the placebo group, no significant changes in CCL17 concentrations were noted. There were also no differences between groups for all other biomarkers.

Results from imaging measures of synovitis showed a reduction from baseline to week 12 in patients who received otilimab. Differences in MRI outcomes were minimal, and a trend for reduced synovitis and osteitis was seen early during active treatment, but not at 12 weeks after the treatment was stopped. The RAMRIS synovitis score showed a least-squares mean change from baseline of -1.3 (SE, 0.6) in the otilimab group and a mean change of 0.8 (SE, 1.2) in the placebo group (P =.11). The RAMRIQ synovitis score showed a least-squares mean change from baseline of -1417.0 L in the otilimab group and -912.3 L with placebo (P =.75).

All adverse events were reported to be mild or moderate, and the number of adverse events was similar in the otilimab and placebo groups (39% and 36%, respectively). The most common adverse event was cough (7%) in the active treatment group and pain in extremity (18%) and RA (18%) in the placebo group. There were no serious adverse events or deaths.

The study had several limitations, including the relatively small sample size, imbalanced baseline disease-modifying antirheumatic drug use among treatment groups, and the determination of the RAMRIS synovitis score based on assessment by a single radiologist.

The findings of this study support the rationale for the further clinical development of otilimab as a treatment option for patients with [RA]. Additionally, the effect of otilimab on CCL17 indicates that CCL17 shows promise as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for otilimab in future studies, the researchers concluded.

Disclosure: This clinical trial was supported by GlaxoSmithKline. Please see the original reference for a full list of authors disclosures.

Genovese MC, Berkowitz M, Conaghan PG, et al. MRI of the joint and evaluation of the granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factorCCL17 axis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving otilimab: a phase 2a randomised mechanistic study. Lancet Rheumatol. Published online October 7, 2020. doi:10.1016/s2665-9913(20)30224-1

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Comparison of the effectiveness of pilates exercises, aerobic exercises, and pilates with aerobic exercises in patients with rheumatoid arthritis -…

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Background:Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a rheumatic disease characterized by erosive synovitis and polyarthritis. Exercise is known to improve many symptoms in RA patients.

Aim:This study was designed to compare the effects of pilates exercises, aerobic exercises, and combined training including pilates with aerobic exercises on fatigue, depression, aerobic capacity, pain, sleep quality, and quality of life.

Methods:Thirty voluntary RA patients were included in this study. Patients were divided into three groups equally, and treatment was applied to each group for 8 weeks. Pilates exercises were practiced to the first group, aerobic exercises were practiced to the second group, and combined training was performed to the third group. Fatigue, depression, aerobic capacity, pain, sleep quality, and quality of life were evaluated using Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), 6-minute walk test (6MWT), McGill Pain Questionnaire- Short Form (MPQ-SF), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life (RAQoL), respectively.

Results:The results of the present study showed significant improvements for the first group on fatigue, depression, aerobic capacity, and quality of life (p < 0.05). Improvements in all parameters except for pain were obtained for the second and third groups (p < 0.05). In addition, there was no statistically significant difference among the treatment groups in assessments (p > 0.05).

Conclusion:Pilates exercises may have similar effects to aerobic exercises in patients with RA. Addition of clinical pilates exercises to the routine treatment of RA may enhance the success of rehabilitation. Trial registrationNCT03836820.

Keywords:Aerobic exercises; Fatigue; Pilates exercises; Rheumatoid arthritis.

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ZetrOZ Receives Funding from the National Institute of Health to Find New Ways to Reduce Arthritic Pain for Over 60 Million Americans Using…

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

TRUMBULL, Conn., Oct. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --ZetrOZ Systems, developers of sustained acoustic medicine (SAM), an FDA-cleared home-use ultrasound device that helps reduce pain associated with tendon, ligament, and muscle injuries, has received funding from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to find a way to reduce arthritic pain utilizing non-surgical, non-narcotic technology.

Arthritic pain has been primarily managed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), namely diclofenac. Diclofenac, which is administered topically, is limited in its efficacy due to its limited ability to penetrate the skin. New findings from researchers at the University of Cincinnati show SAM technology's ability to deliver NSAIDs locally and effectively, demonstrating 380% enhanced delivery compared to existing technology for the treatment of joint pain.

"Targeted and localized drug delivery is the holy grail for many therapeutic agents, and this has been demonstrated with small-molecule therapeutics, combined with our latest sam 2.0," says Dr. George Lewis, CEO of ZetrOZ Systems. "The research community is excited by the findings, as it has broad implications for the local delivery of therapeutic agents without the need for oral delivery."

The study published in the Journal of Therapeutic Delivery Vol 11. NO 6.investigated the use of sam 2.0, "a multi-hour, wearable, localized, sonophoresis transdermal drug delivery device for the penetration enhancement of diclofenac through the skin." The use of sam 2.0 medical technology resulted in increased delivery of diclofenac by 380% and increased depth of penetration of the skin by 32%. Findings concluded that sustained acoustic medicine can be used as an effective transdermal drug-delivery device for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

"Our collaborations with the top research institutions such as the University of Cincinnati foster continuous innovation on sustained acoustic medicine in the treatment of chronic pain," adds Lewis.

About ZetrOZ Systems

ZetrOZ Systems is an FDA cGMP and ISO 13585 medical technology company headquartered in the southern coastal region of Connecticut. The organization also has manufacturing facilities across the United States. ZetrOZ Systems produced UltrOZ, samSport and samPro 2.0 to provide safe and effective treatment options for prevalent conditions such as arthritis. Learn more at zetroz.comand samrecover.com.

Media Contact: [emailprotected]

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sam-2-0-medical-technology.jpg SAM 2.0 medical technology featured in the Journal of Therapeutic Delivery for the treatment of chronic arthritis pain

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Rheumatoid arthritis drug tocilizumab falls short as treatment for hospitalized Covid-19 patients in three studies – msnNOW

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/Getty Images A medic prepares to transfer a patient on a stretcher from an ambulance outside of Emergency at Coral Gables Hospital where Coronavirus patients are treated in Coral Gables near Miami, on July 30, 2020. - Florida has emerged as a major new epicenter of the US battle against the disease, with confirmed cases recently surpassing New York and now second only to California. The state toll has leapt over the past week and more than 6,500 people have died from the disease there, according to health officials. More than 460,000 people have been infected with the virus in Florida, which has a population of 21 million, and a quarter of the state's cases are in Miami. The US has tallied a total of 151,826 deaths from COVID-19, making it the hardest-hit country in the world. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)

Tocilizumab, a repurposed rheumatoid arthritis drug once considered a promising treatment for hospitalized patients with Covid-19, generally did not increase patients' chances of survival or help them get better faster, according to three trials published this week.

However, a fourth trial did find the drug increased the chances of survival, but because it was an observational study, the results are considered less definitive.

Three of the trials were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association and the other was published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

While this leaves the picture for tocilizumab use a bit muddy, the studies taken together show the drug isn't a magic bullet that should be used in all hospitalized patients with Covid-19, but they leave the door open for possible use in specific patient groups.

"It is possible that forthcoming results from other randomized trials will help us identify specific groups of people who will benefit. However, growing evidence supports current guidelines, which recommend against tocilizumab use outside of clinical trials," Dr. Jonathan Parr told CNN.

Parr, an assistant professor in the division of infectious diseases at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, wrote an editorial that was published alongside the three studies in JAMA.

Tocilizumab, sold under the brand name Actemra and used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, blocks interleukin-6, a molecule that produces inflammation.

Earlier in the pandemic, the drug became widely used in the United States after reports from China and Europe appeared to show it helped very ill patients who experienced a so-called cytokine storm by extinguishing the out-of-control inflammation that developed in response to the coronavirus.

However, those early reports were mostly observational, meaning they took existing data and analyzed it as opposed to designing a trial specifically to assess tocilizumab.

But now the results from trials designed to look at the drug prospectively are beginning to come in.

The first of the three JAMA studies found that hospitalized patients in Italy who were not yet in intensive care and who received tocilizumab fared no better than those who received standard care. The trial was stopped early due to "futility."

A similar study in France found that tocilizumab may have led to slight improvements by day 14 over usual care, but there were no differences in survival by day 28.

The third study found that the risk of in-hospital death was about 30% lower in US patients receiving tocilizumab within the first two days of ICU admission compared to those who didn't get the drug.

But because it was an observational trial there could be factors that affected the results other than how well the drug itself worked.

"We specifically studied tocilizumab administration in very sick patients, all of whom required ICU level of care. In contrast, the [other two trials] studied patients with much milder illness severity," said Dr. Shruti Gupta of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, who led the study team.

Dr. David Leaf, the trial's senior author, added, "We focused on early use of tocilizumab -- within the first two days of ICU admission. This may be the key to tocilizumab's efficacy -- administering it prior to the occurrence of irreversible organ injury," he said in an email.

Gupta said their findings need confirmation by a large randomized, controlled trial.

The fourth study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, used the gold standard of trial design-- it's a randomized, double-blind, placebo control trial.

It enrolled 243 patients from seven Boston-area hospitals who were admitted with Covid-19 at the height of the surge in that region.

"The primary goal of the trial was to determine if tocilizumab, administered intravenously at a moderate stage of the patients' disease, could prevent progression to intubation or death," said Dr. John H. Stone, lead study author and director of Clinical Rheumatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, told CNN via email.

But the findings were not encouraging for the use of tocilizumab.

"Our data do not support the concept that early IL-6 receptor blockade is an effective treatment strategy in moderately ill patients hospitalized with Covid-19 infection," said Stone.

Results show that the chances of intubation or death were about similar in both groups and patients in both groups essentially took the same amount of time to discontinue supplemental oxygen.

So, where does that leave tocilizumab?

"Tocilizumab may still have a role in COVID-19. Several large trials are expected to come out soon that will tell us more about how and when it should be used, if at all," said Parr, noting that it "shouldn't be taken off the table completely, but we need more convincing evidence before using it routinely."

Stone agreed that the drug may still benefit other patient groups, but he stressed the importance of doing these trials.

"An important take-away point from our trial and the overall experience with IL-6 receptor blockade is that any such approach to the treatment of COVID-19 must be subjected to randomized, blinded trials," he said, adding that the trials should be done "before the adoption of widespread use."

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market Highlights On Future Development 2018 to 2028 – TechnoWeekly

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

New Study Reports Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market 2020 Global Market Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies and Forecasts 2026 has been Added on Fact.MR.OverviewStarting from the fundamental details, the report provides a complete overview of the industry along with a proper market profile. The details provided here about the crucial technologies used for manufacturing and product management purpose makes it easier to have a thorough insight into the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market. Based on the information obtained, the market has been segmented into various categories. It predicts the growth rate of the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market in between the forecasted period, having a base year as 2020.

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This report focuses Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy market, it covers details as following:Competitive landscape

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Market DynamicsThe report identifies all the key aspects that drive the super-fast growth of the international Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market. In this context, it identifies the crucial aspects regarding the pricing part of the concerned product. It analyses the market value of each of the products and services as well in the report, including the various kinds of volume trends. Prime aspects that are covered in this report range from the effect of growing population at international level, accelerating technological growth, and the analysis of level of demand and supply as evident in the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market. The report also covers extensive studies regarding various effects in relation to the initiatives taken by the government and the competitive platform that is there in the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market in between the forecasted period. Segmental AnalysisThe report does thorough segmentation of international Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market upon taking various factors associated with the growth of the market. It does a thorough regional segmentation. These segmentation based studies are done with an intention of achieving a thorough and specific insight of the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market. The report does a regional analysis of the key zones of the world, starting from the US, North America, Latin America, Middle East & Africa, and Asia. Modes of researchThe research being done by experienced experts has done a comprehensive analysis of Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market based on Porters Five Force Model, taking the assessment period between 2020-2026 into account. Additionally, a deep SWOT analysis is done to facilitate quick decision making for the associated people in the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market.

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Report covers:Comprehensive research methodology of Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market.This report also includes detailed and extensive market overview with gap analysis, historical analysis & key analyst insights.An exhaustive analysis of macro and micro factors influencing the market guided by key recommendations.Analysis of regional regulations and other government policies impacting the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market.Insights about market determinants which are stimulating the Global Rheumatoid Arthritis Stem Cell Therapy Market.Detailed and extensive market segments with regional distribution of forecasted revenuesExtensive profiles and recent developments of market players

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Platelet glycoprotein Ib alpha chain as a putative therapeutic target for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a Mendelian randomization study – DocWire…

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Objective:To ascertain the role of platelet glycoprotein Ib alpha chain (GPIb) plasma protein levels in cardiovascular, autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases and whether its effects are mediated by platelet count.

Methods:We performed a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) study, using both cis and trans-acting protein expression quantitative trait loci (pQTL) near GP1BA and BRAP genes as instruments. To assess if platelet count mediated the effect, we then performed a two-step MR study. Putative associations (GPIb/ platelet count/ disease) detected by MR analyses were subsequently assessed using multiple-trait-colocalization analyses.

Results:After correcting for multiple testing (P 210-3), GPIb, instrumented by either cis-pQTL or trans-pQTL, was causally implicated with increased risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative subtypes). These effects of GPIb appear to be mediated by platelet count and are supported by strong evidence of colocalization (probability of all three traits sharing a common causal variant 0.80). GPIb instrumented by cis-pQTL did not appear to affect cardiovascular risk, although the GPIb trans-pQTL associates with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases but decreased risk of autoinflammatory diseases, suggesting this trans- instrument acts through other pathways.

Conclusion:The role of platelets in thrombosis is well-established, however our findings provided some novel genetic evidence that platelets may be causally implicated in the development of JIA, and GPIba as a putative therapeutic target for these JIA subtypes.

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Try these three natural remedies to manage arthritis pain – Germiston City News

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

Arthritis affects over 350 million people in the world.

It is also a leading cause of disability and can affect mobility and interrupt peoples ability to perform simple daily tasks.

World Arthritis Day was on October 12, which aimed to raise awareness about rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases. Although strides have been made to find suitable treatments, many continue to suffer from debilitating pain.

Owner and founder of The Harvest Table, Catherine Clark, said there are natural remedies which can help manage symptoms associated with arthritis.

There is no cure for arthritis, but if you support your body with the right foods and supplements, you can alleviate some of the pain so that it doesnt become a hindrance in your daily life, said Clark.

Clark added that arthritis can affect ones energy levels, cause pain, and is a direct result of a loss of collagen in the bones.

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The key is to find solutions that will help you feel less fatigued, while also managing pain and replenishing the collagen lost, she said. Clark offers three natural remedies to manage arthritis pain:

Anti-inflammatory foodsArthritis fatigue is real, and according to the Arthritis Foundation, unchecked inflammation and pain largely contribute to your energy levels, along with certain medications that can cause drowsiness.Boosting your energy starts with nourishing your body with the right foods, especially those with high anti-inflammatory properties that help your bodies repair process. This will not only alleviate pain but will reduce the inflammation in your body. To effectively manage your arthritis, reduce the amounts of processed foods and saturated fats as these will only further contribute to your symptoms. Instead, choose fresh fruits and vegetables, especially green vegetables and berries. Also include fish and nuts, which both contain high anti-inflammatory properties.

Slow and gentle movementMovement is a critical part of recovery when addressing the symptoms of arthritis as it retains the suppleness of your joints. Various low impact movements can specifically tackle flexibility, strength and generally support your joints to prevent injury. Prolonged lack of movement can lead to chronic stiffness that results into joint immobility which will impact your ability to complete daily activities. Yoga is an effective solution as it reduces joint pain and also eases stress, tension and promotes better quality sleep.

Collagen-rich supplementsCollagen consists of protein building blocks, otherwise known as amino acids, which aid in cushioning our joints. When you have arthritis, this cushioning diminishes which then affects your cartilage and leads to your bones rubbing against each other without protection. Supplements like Bone Broth and Collagen granules help replenish the collagen content in your body. Bone Broth is a natural anti-inflammatory, so when you have it as part of your diet, you benefit in more ways than one. Collagen granules can help reduce both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis joint pain, improve flexibility, and helps form new bones. Although all the collagen you ingest does not go straight to your bones, increasing your intake makes them readily available for your body tissues.

Natural remedies are meant to support your body so that you can better manage pain and other symptoms associated with arthritis.

The idea is to implement small and manageable changes that contribute to you feeling better and having the energy and ability to get through the day without pain getting in the way, Clark concludes.

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Septic Arthritis Treatment Market 2020| Know The Latest Trends, Business Outlook, New Opportunities By Top Key Player | Affluence Market Reports -…

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

The report on Septic Arthritis Treatment Marketgives an analysis of Septic Arthritis Treatment Industry dependent on angles that are significant for the market study. Factors like production, the share of the overall industry, revenue rate, regions and key players characterize an overall market study. This report gives an overview of market esteemed and its development in the coming years. It likewise predicts CAGR.

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Major Key Players in this Septic Arthritis Treatment Market Report are as follows:

Lupin Pharmaceuticals (US), F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd (Swtizerland), AbbVie Inc (US), Amgen Inc (US), Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (US) , Johnson & Johnson (US), Pfizer (US) ,

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With an overall methodology for information aggregation, the market situations include significant players, cost and pricing working in particular geographies. Statistical looking over-utilized are SWOT Analysis, PESTLE analysis, prescient examination, and constant examination. Charts are plainly used to help the data format for a clear understanding of facts and figures.

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Rheumatoid arthritis drug falls short as treatment for hospitalized Covid-19 patients in three studies – CNN

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

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Rheumatoid arthritis drug falls short as treatment for hospitalized Covid-19 patients in three studies - CNN

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The 4 Best Types of Exercise to Ease Arthritis Pain and Stiffness – LIVESTRONG.COM

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

When it comes to exercise for arthritis, even simple moves like stretching can help ease joint pain and stiffness.

Image Credit: kali9/E+/GettyImages

If you have arthritis, going for a jog may seem like it would do your joints more harm than good. But as counterintuitive as it seems, physical activity may be just what the doctor ordered.

About 54 million people in the U.S. have been diagnosed with arthritis, an inflammatory condition that causes joint pain and swelling.

These symptoms can also prevent people from exercising: Almost 24 percent of people with arthritis don't do any physical activity (compared to about 18 percent of those without the condition), according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

"In general, people with arthritis tend to want to take it easy or not exercise as much," Brian Andonian, MD, a rheumatologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, tells LIVESTRONG.com. "But exercise, done right, is probably one of the most beneficial things they can do to help their joints."

Osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis in the U.S., occurs when the cartilage surrounding the ends of bones (such as those of the knees and hands) break down which is partly why it's known as "wear and tear" arthritis. But in some ways, that definition can be misleading.

"The 'wear and tear' component is really much more specific," says Joseph Garry, MD, a visiting professor of clinical family medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine Rockford. "It's not so much moving or exercising."

Rather, he explains, osteoarthritis can be caused by overloading the joint, by being overweight, maybe, or by carrying lots of heavy objects at work. Joint injuries, such as those sustained by playing a sport, may also increase the risk for osteoarthritis, he says.

Exercise, however, can help ease pain from osteoarthritis as well as from other inflammatory types of arthritis, including rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, says Dr. Andonian.

Ready to get started? Here's a closer look at why exercise is so beneficial for people with arthritis, and how to start working out safely.

Why Exercise Is Good for Arthritis

Exercise can reduce pain, improve joint function and boost the quality of life of people with arthritis, according to the CDC.

One early investigation into exercise and arthritis, published January 2008 in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, found that people with arthritis who participated in an exercise program felt less pain and fatigue at the end of eight weeks than those who didn't work out. Plus, they continued to feel less pain and fatigue six months later.

Newer research has confirmed those findings, concluding that even short periods of activity can help prevent joint pain from worsening. In a study published May 2019 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, people with joint pain who performed one hour of moderate-to-vigorous activity a week were less likely to develop a disability after four years as those who weren't as active.

"Any exercise for somebody with arthritis who's sedentary is going to be helpful. Every little bit adds up, even a few minutes here and there."

Exercise can help ease joint pain in a few ways, says Dr. Andonian. For starters, he says, physical activity can strengthen the muscles that surround the joint, which helps take some of the pressure off the joint itself. It also helps you sleep better, which can also help ease pain.

Another way exercise can help ease arthritis symptoms is by lowering the levels of inflammation in the body, which is a characteristic of arthritis, he says.

"I think of exercise as being an anti-inflammatory treatment," says Dr. Andonian. "We know that exercise has pretty powerful ways of [regulating] the way the immune system works."

Specifically, he explains, fat is more pro-inflammatory than lean muscle mass, which tends to be more anti-inflammatory and beneficial for arthritis.

The Best Types of Exercise for Arthritis

Yoga is a great way to improve your balance and range of motion when you have arthritis.

Image Credit: Ridofranz/iStock/GettyImages

Because both aerobic exercise and strength training improve body composition, doing either one and ideally both can help improve arthritis symptoms, Dr. Andonian says.

Other types of activity that you may want to try include range-of-motion and body awareness exercises, according to the American College of Rheumatology.

Here are some examples of these four main types of exercise, plus good options for people with arthritis:

3. Range-of-Motion Exercises

4. Body Awareness Workouts

If you're just starting an exercise program, one of the best things you can do is commit to an activity that you like to do, and one that's also compatible with your schedule and lifestyle.

"Keeping up a program in the long-term has got to be enjoyable," Dr. Andonian says.

The CDC recommends adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, but if you haven't been exercising very much (if at all), try working up to that goal slowly, over time, says Dr. Andonian.

"Any exercise for somebody with arthritis who's sedentary is going to be helpful," he says. "Every little bit adds up, even a few minutes here and there."

Are There Any Risks to Exercising With Arthritis?

Before you start a new exercise program, it's a good idea to let your doctor know what you're doing, says Dr. Andonian. Your provider may be able to refer you to another health care professional, like a physical therapist, who can design a workout plan for you and even help coach you through the movements.

After you start exercising, you'll probably feel some stiffness or swelling, possibly for six to eight weeks, according to the CDC. But that's OK.

"A little bit of soreness isn't necessarily a bad thing, especially if you're starting to get some gains over time," Dr. Andonian says.

That said, you may want to modify certain exercises to make them more comfortable for you, he says. For example, if you have knee osteoarthritis, you can try starting a walking program, but avoid climbing a lot of hills. Or, if you want to try cycling but have arthritis in your spine or hip, he recommends sitting on a bike in a reclined position, which can be more comfortable.

Even if you're having a flare-up of arthritis, it's still a good idea to try to do some exercise.

"A lot of people just completely stop all activities," he says. "I recommend that people try to stay active as much as they can within their comfort zone, even just doing light activities like range-of-motion type exercises."

If you happen to feel any sharp, stabbing and constant pain, pain that causes you to limp or pain in your joints that are red or feel "hot," the CDC recommends calling your doctor.

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The 4 Best Types of Exercise to Ease Arthritis Pain and Stiffness - LIVESTRONG.COM

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Arthritis Diet: Avoid These Foods And Drinks To Fight Inflammation Effectively – Doctor NDTV

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Arthritis leads to inflammation and pain in joints. It reduces mobility and make it difficult to perform day to day activities. Here are some foods that you should avoid if suffering from arthritis.

Arthritis diet should include foods anti-inflammatory foods

Arthritis is a condition that affects the joints of an individual. It leads to pain, stiffness and inflammation in the joints. The symptoms of arthritis worsen with age. There are several types of arthritis that can affect a person. Pain, stiffness, swelling, reduced range of motion and redness near the joints are some typical symptoms of this condition. Arthritis diet includes foods that can help ease inflammation and joint pain. It is usually suggested to add anti-inflammatory foods to an arthritis diet. Therefore, people with arthritis are often advised to avoid foods that can trigger inflammation. Here's a list of foods that people with arthritis should be avoiding.

Consumption of sugar in excess can result in inflammation as per studies. It can also lead to weight gain which can make it hard to manage this condition. Sugar is usually hidden in several foods and drinks. You should also avoid foods with added sugar.

Consuming too much sugar can contribute to weight gainPhoto Credit: iStock

Ultra-processed foods may also contain inflammatory ingredients that can worsen the symptoms of arthritis. Highly processed foods are generally high in salt and sugar which are harmful to your health when consumed in excess.

Also read:Arthritis Diet: 5 Anti-Inflammatory Foods That Should Be A Part Of Your Diet

Studies have shown that drinking too much alcohol can increase the severity of gout which is a type of arthritis. It can also increase inflammation. Too much alcohol consumption is also linked with several health conditions.

Also read:These Remedies Can Help Relieve Arthritis Pain Naturally

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Studies have also highlighted that consuming processed meat regularly may demonstrate high levels of inflammation.

Disclaimer: This content including advice provides generic information only. It is in no way a substitute for qualified medical opinion. Always consult a specialist or your own doctor for more information. NDTV does not claim responsibility for this information.

DoctorNDTV is the one stop site for all your health needs providing the most credible health information, health news and tips with expert advice on healthy living, diet plans, informative videos etc. You can get the most relevant and accurate info you need about health problems like diabetes, cancer, pregnancy, HIV and AIDS, weight loss and many other lifestyle diseases. We have a panel of over 350 experts who help us develop content by giving their valuable inputs and bringing to us the latest in the world of healthcare.

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Arthritis Diet: Avoid These Foods And Drinks To Fight Inflammation Effectively - Doctor NDTV

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Remission: This Is What It Really Feels Like – Self

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Working in the medical field for over 30 years helped me navigate health care appointments for my rheumatoid arthritis. I'm not afraid to ask if I need a test, and if I think that something needs to be looked at, I'm not shy: I ask. The patient has a right to do that, and I have a very good relationship with my health care team.

After years of trying different medications that I couldnt tolerate for long periods or that didn't work for me, including methotrexate and NSAIDs, I started taking a biologic in 2001, 10 years after my diagnosis. Im still on it. For me, its been a life changer. I think its the reason Im still able to work full-time, which in turn keeps me going.

What also helped was finding a community who understood what I was going through. In 1991, the only way I could see how people handled living with rheumatoid arthritis was by watching VHS tapes from the library. I didnt know anyone else with arthritis when I was diagnosed, or anyone else on my treatment. I wanted to talk to somebody else and see how it was going for them, and share my great experience with people.

For years, it felt like no one understood. If I tried to talk to someone about the pain and the obstacles I was facing, people accused me of being negative. I needed to find people who were uplifting.

In 2002, I discovered CreakyJoints, a community for people with arthritis. Meeting other people online in the chat room and later on the Facebook page was really helpful, and I started reading the monthly newsletter. Although Im naturally a shy person, I wanted to get more involved. I edited the poetry section of the newsletter for three years, helped put together a book in 2017, and became one of the first members of the patients council. We meet monthly and work on pamphlets to help raise awareness, especially about the mental health side of living with arthritis. I really want people to know that if you're having a hard time coping, it's okay to find somebody to talk to. You don't have to go this alone. There are people out there just like you. And when you reach out for help, youre not only helping yourself, youre helping others as well.

As hard as rheumatoid arthritis can be, Ive always had hope. In 2020, I started noticing that I was feeling better. Things like getting dressed, which could be absolute agony, were easier. I started seeing a new rheumatologist in February, and after a check-up in August, I found out I was already in remission. I thought, I'm in remission? I was shockedit was awesome!

Being in remission from rheumatoid arthritis is almost like being given a gift. I was briefly in remission 10 years ago, and even though it only lasted a couple of months, I always said it could happen again: I never gave up hope. Im hoping it will last longer this time.

Im very aware that I still live with rheumatoid arthritis. It hasn't suddenly gone away, it's just that things are quiet right now. I still experience fatigue and I still live with pain. I have joint deformity from before I started taking the treatment Im on, and that will never be fixed. But I havent had very bad days since remission. I still have to be vigilant and keep taking my medication, and keep doing all the things Ive been doing to stay healthy. Exercise is very important; I walk half a mile to and from work most weekdays, even in the winter! I also know when to rest, especially since Im more vulnerable to infections on the medication.

Attitude is so important too. When you have rheumatoid arthritis, not every day is going to be great. But I find that if you can bring humor, even when you're in pain, it can at least get your mind off it for a little while. And dont ever give up hope. I trust scientists, and just look at the drugs that are out there now, and the ones that are still being developed. Ive lived with the disease for a long time, and I want people to know that Im proof that remission can happenand its great.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Modestly Elevated Serum Procalcitonin Levels in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis Free of Active Infection – DocWire News

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Background and objectives: To investigate the serum procalcitonin (PCT) levels among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) without active infection compared with healthy controls and to understand the relationship of PCT with RA disease activity, and treatment received by patients.

Materials and Methods: Patients aged 20 years and above with clinician-confirmed diagnosis of RA and healthy volunteers were included during regular outpatient visits, and those with active infection symptoms and signs were excluded. RA disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score-28 for Rheumatoid Arthritis with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR). Medications received by the patients were also recorded.

Results: A total of 623 patients with RA and 87 healthy subjects were recruited in this study. The mean PCT were significantly higher in patients with RA (6.90 11.81 10-3ng/mL) compared with healthy controls (1.70 6.12 10-3ng/mL) (p< 0.001) and the difference remained statistically significant after adjusting for age and sex. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis showed that a lower rank-transformed PCT serum level was significantly correlated with the use of biologics (p= 0.017) and a high DAS28-ESR score (p = 0.028) in patients with RA.

Conclusion: Patients with RA have a significantly higher serum PCT levels compared with healthy controls. The use of biologics and an active RA disease activity were associated with a lower level of PCT in patients with RA. Further investigation is required to determine the optimal cutoff value of PCT among patients with RA and its association with disease activity and biologic usage.

Keywords:disease activity; disease activity index; infection; procalcitonin; rheumatoid arthritis.

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Impact of Enthesitis on Psoriatic Arthritis Patient-Reported Outcomes and Physician Satisfaction with Treatment: Data from a Multinational Patient and…

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Introduction:Enthesitis is a core outcome domain assessed in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) clinical trials. Limited evidence describes the impact of enthesitis on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and physician satisfaction with current treatment options. The objective of this analysis is to characterize the impact of enthesitis on PROs and physician satisfaction with currently available treatment in clinical practice settings.

Methods:Cross-sectional survey of rheumatologists, dermatologists, and their consulting patients with PsA in Australia, Canada, European Union (EU5), and the USA conducted in 2018. Physicians assessed current presence and severity of enthesitis, overall disease severity, other symptoms experienced, and their satisfaction with the current treatment. PsA participant self-reported data included current pain level, EQ5D, Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease (PsAID12), Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Index (WPAI-SHP). Bivariate descriptive analyses were conducted to describe features and outcomes in participants with and without enthesitis.

Results:Rheumatologists (454) and dermatologists (238) provided information for 3157 participants with PsA. Mean participant age was 49.2 years, and 45.9% were female. Enthesitis was present currently in 6.5% (205) of participants with PsA. Those with enthesitis had worse overall disease severity compared to those without enthesitis (12.2% vs 2.2% severe) and had more extraarticular manifestations, including nail psoriasis, dactylitis, and sacroiliitis. Enthesitis was associated with more pain, worse quality of life (QoL), increased disability, and a negative impact on work. Participants with enthesitis had higher NSAIDs and opioid pain medication use but similar biologic use. Physicians were significantly less satisfied with current PsA treatment in participants with enthesitis versus without enthesitis.

Conclusions:Participants with psoriatic arthritis with enthesitis experienced significantly higher disease burden than those without enthesitis but were not more likely to receive advanced therapies. Physicians were significantly more dissatisfied with treatment in patients with enthesitis than in those without it.

Keywords:PROs; Patient-reported outcome; Psoriatic arthritis; Real-world evidence; Satisfaction.

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MRI following medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction: assessment of imaging features found with post-operative pain, arthritis, and graft…

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Objective:To assess MR features following MPFL reconstruction and determine their influence on post-operative pain, progressive arthritis, or graft failure.

Materials and methods:Retrospective study on 38 patients with MPFL reconstruction and a post-operative MRI between January 2010 and June 2019. Two radiologists assessed MPFL graft signal, graft thickness, femoral screw, femoral tunnel widening, and patellofemoral cartilage damage. The third performed patellofemoral instability measurements. All three assessed femoral tunnel position with final result determined by majority consensus. Imaging findings were evaluated in the setting of post-operative pain, patellofemoral arthritis, and MPFL graft failure including need for MPFL revision. Statistics included chi-square, Fishers exact test, t test, and kappa.

Results:Mean graft thickness was 6.0 1.8 mm; 24% of the grafts were diffusely hypointense. Mean femoral tunnel widening was 2.5 1.8 mm; 34% of the femoral screws were broken or extruded. Fifty-two percent of the patients had no interval cartilage change. Non-anatomic femoral tunnels were found in 66% of patients, including in all 9 patients requiring revision MPFL reconstruction (p = 0.013). Revised MPFL grafts had more abnormal femoral screws compared to those that did not (67% vs. 24%) (p = 0.019). Other MR features did not significantly influence the evaluated outcomes.

Conclusion:The need for revision MPFL reconstruction occurs more frequently when there is a non-anatomic femoral tunnel and broken or extruded femoral screws. The appearance of the MPFL graft itself is not an influencing factor for post-operative pain, progression of patellofemoral arthritis, or graft failure.

Keywords:Graft failure; MPFL reconstruction; MRI; Medial patellofemoral ligament; Post-operative knee.

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Health: The alternative ways to ease joint pain and arthritis – The Sunday Post

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Arthritis means sore joints and often lots of painkillers to keep the aches at bay. But there could be alternatives to popping prescription pills every day, according to experts.

Exercise, weight loss and supplements, such as vitamin D and rosehip, could help manage the often agonising symptoms of joint health, it is claimed. Dr Alastair Dickson, a GP with an interest in arthritis, said joint problems are common.

They can be caused by lots of things and can be short-term pain or more long term, he said. Acute pain is often caused by knocks, sprains and other injuries. Typically, this pain will get better over a number of days or weeks.

Persistent joint pain often results from more chronic processes related to trauma and wear and tear, such as osteoarthritis, and inflammatory arthritis.

Osteoarthritis, Dr Dickson explains, is the response of your body trying to heal your joints and can have a significant impact on the lives of sufferers. The condition is most common in the over 40s, and in people who have suffered more trauma in their joints. It can affect any joint, but the most common are hips, knees, ankles, hands, fingers and neck.

Joint pain is different for each patient, Dr Dickson said.

Commonly osteoarthritis in the large joints (such as your knees and hips) affects your mobility whilst osteoarthritis of your shoulders, hands and fingers can affect your ability to lift and open and close things making everyday tasks such as dressing difficult.

Neck osteoarthritis can make movement such as looking up awkward and painful, he said.

In Scotland it is estimated that 16.6% of people aged over 45 years suffer with knee osteoarthritis and 10.1% have hip osteoarthritis.

The symptoms of osteoarthritis, especially pain, tend to develop slowly and build-up in severity over time, typically years, Dr Dickson explained. If you have pain from osteoarthritis the symptoms are individual to you. Treating everyone in the same way doesnt work.

When it comes to treatment, non-weight bearing exercise and weight loss are considered crucial. And painkillers are often prescribed but Dr Dickson says alternatives, such as physiotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy and evidence-based supplements, can help reduce this long-term reliance on pain relief. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating that overuse of painkillers is problematic and doesnt necessarily cure the pain, he said.

Paracetamol is often insufficient for the pain on its own. To complicate matters further drugs that work for one person dont necessarily work for someone else. There is currently a very large change in practice being suggested with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) draft guidance advising most painkillers for chronic pain should not be used long term as they are ineffective.

The answer, Dr Dickson says, could be to look at the causes of pain and consider supplements where there is good evidence that they are safe and clinically effective. Unfortunately many supplements, such as glucosamine or chondroitin products, rubefacient creams (deep heat creams) are currently not considered to be either clinically or cost-effective following reviews by the NHS.

However, increasing vitamin D has been shown to reduce muscular pain and evidence suggests rosehip may be effective in relieving some symptoms. Dr Dickson, who advises a company who supports GOPO, a rosehip-containing medication, explained: A summary analysis of three clinical trials found that rosehip-containing medications are clinically effective in reducing pain. Studies have found that some rosehip compounds appear to have anti-inflammatory properties and potential benefits to cartilage but there have been no clinical trials to confirm this in patients.

Some patients use rosehip as an alternative to paracetamol. Its not available on the NHS but can be bought over the counter from a chemist. NICE is currently reviewing its osteoarthritis guidance and there should be updated guidance next year. Hopefully NICE will include rosehip compounds in its updated analysis.

He added: I use painkillers but over recent years the evidence has changed for why and how we should be using them: I now increasingly advise that they are to help you to start to mobilise by reducing not curing your pain.

We use the lowest dose possible for the shortest time.

This doesnt mean never taking them but rather educating the patient so they become the expert and, armed with the information, they can become more in charge of how best to manage their pain and when to use painkillers.

Many over-the-counter supplements are thought to be helpful for arthritis sufferers. Here are some you could try:

Glucosamine

Helps keep the cartilage in joints healthy and may have an anti-inflammatory effect. Natural glucosamine levels drop as people age.

Chondroitin sulfate

Often used with glucosamine as an osteoarthritis treatment, researchers found that chondroitin appeared to reduce pain, increase joint mobility, and decrease the need for painkillers.

Omega 3 fatty acids

Found in fish oil, Omega 3 fatty acids encourage the body to produce chemicals that help control inflammation. May help ease stiffness for rheumatoid arthritis patients.

Curcumin

Active ingredient of turmeric, it has anti-inflammatory properties and provides relief for people with osteoarthritis of the knee.

Green tea

Packed with polyphenols, antioxidants believed to reduce inflammation and slow cartilage destruction.

Vitamin D

Important for keeping bones strong and preventing injuries from falls. Research shows that people with low levels of vitamin D may have more joint pain.

Ginger

May be beneficial in managing the inflammation and pain of arthritis, due to anti-inflammatory effects.

Rosehip

Contains polyphenols and anthocyanins, which are believed to ease joint inflammation and prevent damage.

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Factors associated with treatment satisfaction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: data from the biological register RABBIT – DocWire News

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Objective:To assess satisfaction with the effectiveness and tolerability of treatments in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Methods:Patients from the RABBIT register, starting a biological (b) or targeted synthetic (ts) disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), or a conventional synthetic (cs)DMARD treatment after 1 csDMARD failure, were included. Treatment satisfaction was measured after 1 year of treatment in four categories and binarised for analysis. Logistic regression models were performed to calculate ORs for factors associated with treatment satisfaction.

Results:Data of 10 646 patients (74% women, mean 58 years) were analysed. At baseline, 55% of the patients were satisfied with the efficacy and 68% with the tolerability of their previously given treatments. After 1 year, 85% of the patients were satisfied with treatment effectiveness and 90% with tolerability. Baseline satisfaction (OR 2.98, 95% CI 2.58 to 3.44), seropositivity (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.57), reduction of DAS28 (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.31 to 1.46) and pain (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.31), and the improvement of physical capacity (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.29) were positively associated with treatment satisfaction at follow-up while glucocorticoids (GCs) >5 mg/day, depression, fibromyalgia, obesity, prior bDMARDs and therapy changes were negatively associated. The impact of GC on satisfaction was dose-dependent, becoming strongest for GC >15 mg (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.34). A 5 mg/day reduction within 12 months was positively associated with satisfaction regarding efficacy (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.27) and tolerability (OR 1.11, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.21).

Conclusion:Most patients were satisfied with their treatments effectiveness and tolerability after 1 year of treatment. Tapering GCs was positively associated with the improvement of patients satisfaction.

Keywords:Arthritis; Biological Therapy; Patient Reported Outcome Measures; Rheumatoid.

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SIMPONI ARIA (golimumab) for the Treatment of pJIA – Clinical Trials Arena

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

SIMPONI ARIA (golimumab) is a fully human monoclonal antibody used for the treatment of active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA). Credit: Janssen Biotech, Inc. The 4ml single-use vial of SIMPONI ARIA contains 50mg of golimumab. Credit: A2-33. SIMPONI ARIA acts as a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-blocker.

SIMPONI ARIA (golimumab) is a fully human anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha monoclonal antibody.

It is indicated for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in adult patients, as well as active polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) and active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients aged two years and older.

SIMPONI ARIA is available in a single-use vial as a colourless to a light-yellow solution in 50mg / 4ml (12.5mg / ml) dosage strength for intravenous administration.

Discovered and developed by Janssen Biotech, golimumab was initially approved as a subcutaneous injection under the trade name Simponi by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of RA, PsA and AS in adult patients in 2009.

SIMPONI was approved in Europe for the treatment of moderate-to-severe RA, active and progressive PsA, severe, active AS, active ulcerative colitis, severe active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis and pJIA.

In July 2013, the intravenous form of golimumab obtained FDA approval under the trade name Simponi Aria for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active RA in combination with methotrexate (MTX).

The company submitted two supplemental biologics license applications (sBLAs) for Simponi Aria to the FDA for the treatment of PsA and AS in adult patients in December 2016. The applications were approved in October 2017.

The FDA also received two sBLAs for Simponi Aria for the treatment of active pJIA and PsA in paediatric patients in April 2020. The drug was approved for the indications in September 2020.

SIMPONI ARIA is marketed in 24 countries for one or more of the aforementioned indications.

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), previously known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is an arthritis-like inflammatory condition in children characterised by joint swelling, stiffness and pain, persistent for at least six weeks.

The polyarticular form of JIA is most common and is characterised by inflammation in more than four joints, closely resembling adult RA.

PsA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterised by both joint inflammation and skin lesions associated with psoriasis. PsA in paediatric patients is one of the rarest forms of JIA, observed in 2% to 11% of JIA patients.

Other characteristics of psoriatic arthritis include finger and nail defects or complications with the eye.

Golimumab is an anti-TNF biologic agent that binds to soluble and transmembrane bioactive forms of human TNF-alpha, a cytokine protein whose overproduction in the body leads to several chronic inflammatory diseases.

Inhibition of the interaction of TNF-alpha to its receptors inhibits its biological activity.

FDA approval of SIMPONI ARIA for pJIA is based on results from the open-label, multi-centre, phase three clinical trial, GO-VIVA.

SIMPONI ARIA is available in a single-use vial as a colourless to a light-yellow solution in 50mg / 4ml (12.5mg / ml) dosage strength for intravenous administration.

The trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of SIMPONI ARIA in 127 patients with pJIA aged two years to 17 years, following MTX treatment for at least two months.

The efficacy of the drug was consistent with responses in adult patients with RA through 52 weeks.

SIMPONI ARIAs pharmacokinetic (PK) exposure was consistent with the two pivotal phase three clinical trials in adult patients with moderate-to-severe active RA and active PsA.

The safety profile established for SIMPONI ARIA in paediatric patients was also consistent with the results in adult RA and PsA patients.

Common side-effects of SIMPONI ARIA reported in patients during the clinical trial are viral infections, upper respiratory tract infection, increased levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, decreased neutrophil count, rash, bronchitis and high blood pressure.

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The Best and Worst Foods to Eat When You Have Arthritis – LIVESTRONG.COM

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

An arthritis diet should focus on anti-inflammatory foods like fruits and vegetables.

Image Credit: SDI Productions/E+/GettyImages

There's no magic bullet when it comes to treating arthritis, unfortunately. But if you have the condition, you might find some symptom relief by changing what you eat.

Here's the breakdown on how diet and arthritis are linked, and the best and worst foods to eat for joint pain, stiffness and swelling.

The Inflammation Connection

There are more than 100 types of arthritis, but each is marked by chronic inflammation in the joints that can cause swelling and pain, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Acute or short-term inflammation is actually a healthy response that helps protect the body. A fever, which helps you fight off infection, is an example of acute inflammation. This type of inflammation goes away when the threat to the body is gone, according to a December 2019 paper published in Nature Medicine.

Chronic or long-term inflammation is that same response, but all the time. You don't go walking around with a fever 24/7, but inflammation is present in your body to a lesser extent. This chronic inflammation is linked to conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, according to the Nature Medicine paper.

"Diet can absolutely impact arthritis be either exasperating inflammatory symptoms or by quieting inflammation."

Inflammation occurs for different reasons across the various types of arthritis. In osteoarthritis, the most common type, inflammation is caused by wear and tear on the joints, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), on the other hand, is an autoimmune disease, so inflammation occurs because the body mistakenly attacks the joints, per the CDC.

Tamping down that inflammatory response can help manage the pain and other uncomfortable symptoms of arthritis, and that's where your diet comes in: Certain foods can increase or decrease inflammation in the body.

"At the root of the pathology of arthritis is chronic and unchecked inflammation," says Liz Wyosnick, RDN, dietitian and owner of Equilibriyum in Seattle, Washington. "Diet can absolutely impact arthritis be either exasperating inflammatory symptoms or by quieting [inflammation]."

Foods to Limit or Avoid With Arthritis

According to the Arthritis Foundation, the following foods can trigger or worsen inflammation:

This really means "added sugar," which is sugar added to food during processing (think: sweetened beverages like soda and snack foods). You should limit your added sugar to 6 teaspoons per day for women and children, and no more than 9 teaspoons per day for men, according to the American Heart Association.(For reference, 6 teaspoons is about 25 grams and 9 teaspoons is about 38 grams; a 12-ounce can of Coke has 39 grams of sugar.)

Limiting the amount of saturated fat in your diet means eating less red meat, whole-fat dairy, butter and cheese.

Decreasing saturated fats in the diet and replacing them with monounsaturated fats (like nuts, avocado and vegetable oils) may help reduce the progression of knee osteoarthritis, according to March 2017 research published in Arthritis Care and Research.

These are manmade fats that the Food and Drug Administration banned as an ingredient in foods in 2015. However, they're still found in very small amounts in processed baked good and shelf-stable foods that have "partially hydrogenated" in the ingredients list. Here are six foods to avoid.

Omega 6s aren't bad per se, but the issue is when the ratio of omega-6s to omega-3s is off. The goal is to lower the ratio, which means less omega-6 fatty acids and more omega-3s to help reduce the pain associated with arthritis inflammation, according to a February 2018 article published in the Clinical Journal of Pain.

Try to steer clear of processed meats and opt instead for seafood and leaner cuts of grass-fed meat.

Aim to eat a 3- to 6-ounce serving of fatty fish two to four times a week, per the Arthritis Foundation, and opt for fish that are relatively low in mercury, such as salmon, sardines, Atlantic mackerel and black cod.

Gluten is the protein found in wheat, rye and barley, while casein is a protein found in dairy foods. If you have a sensitivity to either of these, this could trigger an inflammatory response.

The link isn't entirely clear, but some individuals with rheumatoid arthritis have found relief by sticking with a gluten-free vegan diet, according to February 2018 research published in Open Rheumatology Journal.

"The underlying theory is that when you go on a plant-based diet, you cut back on animal products (dairy and meat), and hence, exclude most of the foods that promote inflammation, which helps control your RA symptoms," Febin Melepura, MD, medical director at the Sports & Pain Institute of New York, tells LIVESTRONG.com. "In contrast, diets high in animal products and low in fiber might aggravate your arthritis or cause more flare-ups."

What to Eat When You Have Arthritis

Fatty fish like salmon are rich in inflammation-fighting omega-3s.

Image Credit: kajakiki/E+/GettyImages

A diet focused on easing arthritis symptoms typically includes foods that can help decrease inflammation, not promote it. But "there's no one-size-fits-all approach," Dr. Melepura says. "What works for one may not work for another."

With that in mind, here are some loose guidelines to follow, but be sure to adjust where you need to based on your individual symptoms.

It's no secret that fruits and vegetables are recommended for good health, but their role in helping relieve arthritis pain lies in special compounds called phytochemicals, which are responsible for fighting inflammation.

"I would particularly recommend including fruits such as pomegranates, blueberries, raspberries and strawberries," Dr. Melepura says, "as they are a rich source of polyphenols including anthocyanins, quercetin and various types of phenolic acids. All these compounds are widely known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects."

Herbs and spices are also a source of anti-inflammatory compounds.

"Parsley, basil, cilantro, gingerroot, cinnamon and turmeric are some of the most nutrient-dense and anti-inflammatory foods available, so I guide people to incorporate these at most meals," Wyosnick says.

These special fats are found mainly in fish, but you can also find them in walnuts, flaxseeds and chia seeds. Dr. Melepura calls these "joint-friendly fats" and says "studies show that consumption of omega-3 fats lowers the levels of two inflammatory proteins, which are C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6." It should be noted, though, that this has been shown in people with fairly serious diseases, so the research may not translate for those with minor arthritis.

Olive oil is a major component of the Mediterranean diet, which is filled with fruits and vegetables, fish, legumes and nuts. Olive oil is a monounsaturated fat and researchers believe it's one of the reasons why the Mediterranean diet is good for reducing inflammation.

Extra-virgin olive oil specifically has been shown to improve gut health and also cut back on inflammation in the body, according to August 2019 research published in Nutrients.

To help tame arthritis inflammation, fill your plate with fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, fatty fish and healthy fats, such as olive oil. Cut back on sugar and saturated fats, and avoid trans fats completely.

Navigating Your Arthritis With Diet

If your specific type of arthritis has you confused about which type of foods you should eat, don't let that worry you. "An anti-inflammatory eating pattern can be perfectly safe for any type of arthritis," Wyosnick assures.

If you have food allergies or want to confirm an allergy or intolerance that may be aggravating your arthritis pain, speak with your doctor.

In addition, a registered dietitian can help you evaluate your current diet, remove troublesome foods from your diet and add in foods that may help provide some relief.

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Man drank speed to help with arthritis – Observer

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

A GLADSTONE man caught drug driving said he drank speed to help with his arthritis.

Mark Leslie Gordon, 55, pleaded guilty in Gladstone Magistrates Court on Monday to drug driving.

He was intercepted on the Dawson Highway, West Gladstone, on July 25 where he returned a positive drug test.

Further tests showed the presence of MDMA and methamphetamine.

Gordon was caught once again on September 6 on Campbell St.

He told police he drank speed to help with his arthritis.

Further tests showed the presence of THC and meth in his system.

During a search, police located a white crystal substance which weighed less than 1g, which Gordon said was speed.

Defence lawyer Cassandra Ditchfield said her client had been on a waiting list for five years to see a surgeon to treat his rheumatoid arthritis which caused him pain.

She said a friend had suggested he try using the drug to treat the pain as he was not willing to use prescription pain killers due to a family history of liver failure.

She asked the court to consider Gordon had no offending for 11 years.

Gordon was fined $1000 and disqualified from driving for four months.

Convictions were recorded.

Read more drug driver stories:

Mechanic loses licence for half a year

Gladstone man stopped drug driving on way home from library

Recreational user had drugs left over from party

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Man drank speed to help with arthritis - Observer

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