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Archive for the ‘Arthritis’ Category

A Guide to Disability Benefits and Psoriatic Arthritis – Healthline

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a condition that can be particularly debilitating and painful, causing intense flare-ups that cause joints to be become inflamed.

This can make mobility difficult sometimes impossible. Not surprisingly, that can affect the ability to work, no matter your profession.

Although people with PsA can have long periods of remission, with few symptoms or even none, the unpredictability of the condition could require extended periods away from a job, or hinder your ability to look for employment.

According to a 2016 study, one-third of people with PsA reported missing work because of their disease, and the condition impacted their ability to work full-time.

Disability insurance may be able to replace some of that income.

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) is a federal disability insurance benefit for those who have paid into Social Security while working.

If youre in a low-income bracket and havent paid enough into Social Security during your working years to qualify for SSDI, youre not out of luck. In that case, you may be a candidate for a different program called supplemental security income (SSI).

For both SSDI and SSI, benefits are limited to people who fall under the definition of being unable to perform substantial, gainful activity, says Liz Supinski, director of data science at the Society for Human Resource Management.

There are limits on how much a person can earn and still collect, she adds about $1,200 for most people, or around $2,000 per month for blind people.

Some people are covered by private disability insurance, typically acquired through their work, Supinski says.

Having this type of insurance doesnt disqualify you from receiving SSDI, because its usually a short-term benefit with more limited amounts. Because of that, she notes that many people use this insurance to replace income as theyre navigating through the SSDI process.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) categorizes PsA under the classification of immune system impairments, and specifically under sections 14.00D6 and 14.09 as Inflammatory Arthritis.

This encompasses a spectrum of inflammatory arthritis conditions, but all with the main challenge of limiting your movements, mainly through joint pain, swelling, and tenderness.

In addition to PsA, this description could include other conditions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis, and reactive arthritis, also known as Reiters syndrome.

The SSA evaluates the severity of the condition in order to approve disability benefits and acknowledges that your PsA may involve other systems as well, such as:

Because your disability claim is likely to include these types of concerns as well as complications of joint inflammation, its essential to have your medical paperwork together, including insights from your primary care doctor and specialists.

You can apply for disability benefits while youre still employed if your symptoms are significantly impacting your work, although most people tend to apply once theyve left a position, possibly because of their condition, says Supinski.

Whether you have PsA, a different condition, or a combination of conditions, the process for establishing a disability claim will be much more streamlined if you have a breadth of information already in place, says Michelle Ogunwole, MD, a specialist in internal medicine and research fellow at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

If youre managing multiple health issues or a chronic condition like psoriatic arthritis, its already a good idea to compile your medical info in one place, so you have it available for appointments, she says.

That will also give you insight into trends you may not have been seeing before, like possible triggers for a flare-up, she adds.

If possible, have the following information on hand:

Also, let your doctors, colleagues, and family know youll be going through the application process. The SSA gathers input from healthcare providers as well as the applicant and sometimes asks for additional information from family members and co-workers to determine if you qualify as disabled based on SSA criteria.

Claiming disability benefits can be a complex and lengthy process, but taking the time to understand the criteria used by the SSA can help you get closer to getting a claim approved.

Consider reaching out to representatives at your local SSA field office, since they can help you apply for SSDI and SSI benefits.

Make an appointment by calling 800-772-1213, or you can also complete an application online at the SSA website.

Elizabeth Millard lives in Minnesota with her partner, Karla, and their menagerie of farm animals. Her work has appeared in a variety of publications, including SELF, Everyday Health, HealthCentral, Runners World, Prevention, Livestrong, Medscape, and many others. You can find her and way too many cat photos on her Instagram.

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Drug used to treat arthritis could save the lives of those sickest from COVID-19, study finds – ABC Action News

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

TAMPA, Fla. A drug used for nearly a decade to prevent joint pain and swelling in those with arthritis could save your life from COVID-19. A new study is showing promising results with those sickest from the coronavirus.

Theres a promising drug doctors are using right now to treat the sickest of the sick. Its called Tocilizumab under the brand name Actembra.

This is basically another tool in the toolbox for us to help prevent people from getting severe COVID and die," said Dr. Michael Teng, a virologist at USF Health.

The antibody has been used to lessen the inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis for nearly a decade now.

Preliminary findings of the RECOVERY Trial out of the U.K. show Tocilizumab also reduces the risk of death, shortens the amount of time someone is in the hospital and lessens the need for a ventilator.

If you get infected and have severe COVID now there's an additional drug that can help you survive," said Dr. Teng.

The same trial by the University of Oxford first discovered Dexamethasone was effective in fighting COVID.

So they've [researchers] tried things like anti-HIV drugs, which didn't work very well. They tried hydroxychloroquine and the study showed it didn't work very well," said Dr. Teng.

Dexamethasone was used on former President Donald Trump. Now it's part of standard care. Meanwhile, Tocilizumab would provide it a boost. The study shows for every 25 patients treated with the drug, one additional life would have been saved.

But is it necessary with millions of Americans now getting vaccinated? Doctor Teng insists it absolutely is necessary.

Only about 4% of our population has gotten both doses of vaccine. So that means there's a lot of people out there that are still susceptible to coronavirus infection.

Dr. Teng warns there are downsides to the drug.

It's expensive, it's not that widely available," he said.

Nonetheless, he believes, any tool to help in the fight against the pandemic is always welcome.

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How Does Abatacept Compare To Other bDMARDs in Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment? – DocWire News

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

A study evaluated the use of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and compared outcomes between patients taking abatacept compared to other bDMARDs.

The retrospective study included patients with RA treated with abatacept as any line of therapy (LOT) at four different centers in the UK between January 2013 and December 2017.

Final analysis consisted of 213 patients who received up to eight LOTs. The mean age was 55.2 years, and most patients were female (71.4%). The median disease duration prior to initiating bDMARD therapy was 3.9 years (interquartile range, 2.1-8.5 years). Receipt of abatacept or any bDMARD was correlated with reduced six-month disease activity score for 28 joints (DAS28) erythrocyte sedimentation rate and DAS2 C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) scores. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) responses, measured as good, moderate, or no response, were better for patients when receiving abatacept compared to when receiving other bDMARDs, at six months (22.8% vs. 16.6%, 41.3% vs. 41.4%, and 35.9% vs. 42.1%, respectively) and one year (27.9% vs. 21.2%, 36.1% vs. 34.5%, and 36.1% vs. 44.2%, respectively).

The 68 patients who received abatacept as their first LOT were on treatment much longer compared to those receiving other bDMARDs (53.4 months vs. 17.4 months, P<0.01), and this was similar for the second LOT. Patients receiving other bDMARDs who stopped after six months were more likely to sustain an infection requiring antibiotics compared to patients receiving abatacept.

The study was published in BMC Rheumatology.

The researchers acknowledged the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on treatment as well.

The rheumatology community is working to optimise disease management strategies and transition to telehealth. Early research suggests the risk of serious complications from COVID-19 is not increased for patients treated with bDMARDs or targeted synethic DMARDs. However, preventative withdrawal of these treatments, which may occur at the time of COVID-19 symptom onset, should be avoided due to the increased risk of relapse and morbidity. Future research should consider how abatacept and other bDMARDs are used in RA management during and after the pandemic, they recommended.

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Arthritis Knee Pain Centers Offers Therapy That Helps Reduce Osteoarthritis Knee Pain and Increase Mobility – Press Release – Digital Journal

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

The medical practice group provides a non-surgical, non-opioid, outpatient pain relief program to patients around the country.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis and affects more than 32 million adults in the United States alone. Known as the wear and tear arthritis, it occurs when the smooth cushion or the cartilage between bones breaks down, and causes joints to become painful, swollen and hard to move. The knee joint is the most common area for OA to strike and millions of people are hobbled by the debilitating pain, prohibiting them from carrying out everyday activities like climbing stairs, standing up from a seated position, or even standing for an extended amount of time.

Besides the challenge of managing the chronic pain, the consequential immobility and inactivity exacerbates other serious conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. Arthritis Knee Pain Centers provides a comprehensive program that can help reduce pain and increase mobility without surgery or opioids.

Headquarted in Spring, Texas, Arthritis Knee Pain Centers growing network has practices all over the US. They specialize in a minimally invasive therapy designed to replenish depleted joint fluids with an FDA-approved cushioning gel. They use advanced digital imaging for precision placement, removing the guesswork that many of todays practitioners rely on to treat knee and joint pain.

Our singular clinical focus on treating osteoarthritis of the knee combined with our utilization of cutting-edge technology has allowed our specially trained physicians to excel at relieving the often debilitating chronic pain of our patients, says Dr. John J. Rush, Chief Medical Officer of Arthritis Knee Pain Centers. Weve successfully treated more than 20,000 patients since 2016.

Recognizing early warning signs of osteoarthritis can help slow down its progression. Some of its early warning signs are pain; stiffness and loss of flexibility; as well as a scraping or grating sensation when moving the knees. There are many ways that can help reduce the pain and the need for pain medication. Exercise and weight loss; physical therapy; and precision guided injections are some of the ways that can help manage osteoarthritis.

For more information on Arthritis Knee Pain Centers and osteoarthritis, visithttps://www.arthritiskneepain.com.

About Arthritis Knee Pain Centers

Arthritis Knee Pain Centers is a medical practice group that specializes in an FDA-approved pain relief therapy designed to help osteoarthritis sufferers decrease their knee joint pain. Headquartered in Spring, Texas, Arthritis Knee Pain Centers has practices in Texas, New York, Kentucky, Arizona, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, and New Jersey.

Media ContactCompany Name: Arthritis Knee Pain CentersContact Person: Teresa JeffersonEmail: Send EmailPhone: 202-596-9229Country: United StatesWebsite: https://www.arthritiskneepain.com/

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Arthritis Knee Pain Centers Offers Therapy That Helps Reduce Osteoarthritis Knee Pain and Increase Mobility - Press Release - Digital Journal

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Celltrion Healthcare receives European Commission (EC) approval for the first high concentration, low-volume and citrate-free biosimilar adalimumab,…

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

INCHEON, South Korea--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Celltrion Healthcare today announced that on February 11th, the European Commission (EC) has granted marketing authorisation for Yuflyma (CT-P17), an adalimumab biosimilar, across all thirteen intended indications for the treatment of multiple chronic inflammatory diseases.

The EC approval of Yuflyma follows the recommendation for marketing authorisation issued by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in December 2020. The marketing authorisation is based on analytical, preclinical and clinical studies, demonstrating that Yuflyma is comparable to adalimumab, the reference product, in terms of safety, efficacy, PK/PD and immunogenicity up to 24 weeks1 and 1 year2 following treatment. Based on the results of the pivotal study, a high concentration formulation of Yuflyma has been approved for use in the European Union (EU), in patients with thirteen chronic inflammatory diseases; rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), axial spondyloarthritis without radiographic evidence of AS (nr-axSpA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriasis (PsO), paediatric plaque psoriasis (pPsO), hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), Crohns disease (CD), paediatric Crohns disease (pCD), ulcerative colitis (UC), uveitis (UV) and paediatric uveitis (pUV).

In Europe, according to IQVIA data, 60% of the whole adalimumab market has been taken by high concentration formulation and over 90% of the original adalimumab market has already been replaced with a high concentration version. With high concentration, low-volume, and consequently less pain, adalimumab can improve treatment adherence at the very least. Therefore, we focused on development of a high concentration biosimilar to provide a significant alternative to the adalimumab treatment category, said Dr. HoUng Kim, Ph.D., Head of Medical and Marketing Division at Celltrion Healthcare. In terms of the administration device, we have looked to ensure improved convenience for patients as well as providers with the inclusion of needle size (29G), latex-free to reduce allergy risk, and a long storage period or shelf life at room temperature for 30 days.

Professor Rieke Alten, Head of the Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology, Clinical Immunology and Osteology at Schlosspark-Klinik, Teaching Hospital of Charit, Berlin, Germany said, Over the past two decades, anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) biologics have revolutionised the management of chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, but some of the features needed improvement for patients to reach their therapeutic goals. As a physician, we welcome these value-added features such as high concentration and low-volume formulations to reduce injection discomfort.

The centralised marketing authorisation granted by the EC is valid in all EU Member States as well as in the European Economic Area countries Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway. This announcement will enable affordable access to a high concentration adalimumab biosimilar, broadening treatment alternatives for patients suffering with chronic inflammatory disease including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis.

Celltrion will take the EC Decision Reliance Procedure (ECDRP) to minimise lead time to launch the product in the UK and remains committed to delivering innovative and affordable medications to promote patients access to advanced therapies.

- ENDS -

Notes to Editors:

About CT-P17 (biosimilar adalimumab)

CT-P17 is the first proposed high concentration, low- volume and citrate-free adalimumab biosimilar. CT-P17 is indicated for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), axial spondyloarthritis without radiographic evidence of AS (nr-axSpA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriasis (Ps), paediatric plaque psoriasis (pPs), hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), Crohns disease (CD), paediatric Crohns disease (pCD), ulcerative colitis (UC), uveitis (UV) and paediatric uveitis (pUV). CT-P17 is a recombinant human monoclonal antibody that contains the active ingredient adalimumab. Adalimumab is a fully human antitumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) monoclonal antibody. CT-P17 provides pain-reducing features as it comes with citrate-free formulation, meaning it causes less pain upon injection.

About Celltrion Healthcare

Celltrion Healthcare is committed to delivering innovative and affordable medications to promote patients access to advanced therapies. Its products are manufactured at state-of-the-art mammalian cell culture facilities, designed and built to comply with the US FDA cGMP and the EU GMP guidelines. Celltrion Healthcare endeavours to offer high-quality cost-effective solutions through an extensive global network that spans more than 110 different countries. For more information please visit: https://www.celltrionhealthcare.com/en-us

References

1 J. Kay., et al. (2020). A Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase 3 Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of a Proposed High Concentration (100 mg/mL) Adalimumab Biosimilar (CT-P17) with Reference Adalimumab in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe Active Rheumatoid Arthritis. Poster Presented at ACR Convergence 20202 Data on file

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Scottish university teams up with US pharmaceuticals giant for research on immunological diseases, including arthritis – HeraldScotland

Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

THE University of Glasgow is embarking on a 4.6 million, four-year research collaboration with US-based pharmaceuticals group Eli Lilly and Company to discover and validate the next generation of drug targets for immunological diseases.

Led by the universitys Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, the collaboration will work across four diseases: psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibrosis, and vasculitis.

The university said it was hoped the collaboration between its scientists and those of Lilly would help enable the identification of first-in-class therapeutics for people suffering with these devastating and costly conditions.

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It added: Rheumatoid arthritis alone affects 0.3 per cent to 1% of people across the globe and it is estimated that, within ten years of diagnosis, 40% of people will be unable to stay in full-time work. This has major socio-economic repercussions. In the UK, this costs the NHS on average 700 million per year and indirectly costs the UK economy an estimated 8 billion per year.

University of Glasgow principal Professor Sir Anton Muscatelli said: Glasgows researchers have a vision to drive forward innovation, in order to tackle some of societys most urgent challenges. The Glasgow-Lilly collaboration is well positioned to be an inspiring example of this vision and of the exciting possibilities of industry and academia working together. I look forward to seeing this important partnership progress, advancing the next generation of first-in-class therapeutic agents and their alignment with precision medicine approaches.

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The University of Glasgow team is led by Carl Goodyear, and includes Stefan Siebert, Mariola Kurowska-Stolarska, Neal Millar, Neil Basu and Thomas Otto.

Ajay Nirula, vice-president of immunology at Lilly, said: Lillys research efforts continue to expand beyond our own laboratories to include unique partnerships with top academic institutions such as the University of Glasgow. We look forward to collaborating closely with the scientific team at UofG to discover potential new therapies for immunological disorders.

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What Type of Arthritis Do You Have? Understanding Symptoms

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

100 types of joint pain

Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints that can cause debilitating joint pain. There are more than 100 different kinds of arthritis and related conditions.

Arthritis affects more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children in America, according to the Arthritis Foundation. The causes and treatment options available vary from one type of arthritis to another.

To find the best treatment and management strategies, its important to determine the type of arthritis you have. Read on to learn about the types and what their differences are.

Osteoarthritis (OA), also called degenerative arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis. It affects about 27 million people in the United States, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

With OA, cartilage in your joints breaks down, eventually causing your bones to rub together and your joints to be inflamed with subsequent pain, bone injury, and even bone spur formation.

It may occur in just one or two joints, on one side of the body. Age, obesity, injuries, family history, and joint overuse can raise your risk of developing it. Common symptoms include:

To learn if you have OA, your doctor will take your medical history and conduct a physical exam. They may order X-rays and other imaging tests. They may also aspirate an affected joint, taking a sample of fluid from inside to check for infection.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a type of autoimmune disease in which your body attacks healthy joint tissue. The Arthritis Foundation estimates that about 1.5 million adults in the United States have RA. Nearly three times as many women have RA than men.

Common symptoms of RA include morning stiffness and joint pain, typically in the same joint on both sides of your body. Joint deformities can eventually develop.

Additional symptoms may also develop in other parts of your body including the heart, lungs, eyes, or skin. Sjgrens syndrome frequently occurs with RA. This condition causes severely dry eyes and mouth.

Other symptoms and complications include:

Your doctor cant use any single test to determine if you have RA. To develop a diagnosis, theyll likely take a medical history, conduct a physical exam, and order X-rays or other imaging tests.

Your doctor may also order a:

These tests can help your doctor learn if you have an autoimmune reaction and systemic inflammation.

Juvenile arthritis (JA) affects about 300,000 children in the United States have JA, according to the Arthritis Foundation.

JA is an umbrella term for several types of arthritis that affect children. The most common type is juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), formerly known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. This is a group of autoimmune disorders that can impact childrens joints.

JIA starts to occur in children younger than 16 years old. It can cause:

Months of aching joints, swelling, stiffness, fatigue, and fevers may indicate juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

Other less common forms of JA include:

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and other types are autoimmune conditions that can attack the locations where tendons and ligaments attach to your bone. Symptoms include pain and stiffness, especially in your lower back.

Your spine will likely be affected the most, as AS is the most common of these conditions. It usually affects mainly the spine and pelvis but can affect other joints in the body.

Other spondyloarthropathies can attack peripheral joints, such as those in your hands and feet. In AS, bone fusion may occur, causing deformation of your spine and dysfunction of your shoulders and hips.

Ankylosing spondylitis is hereditary. Most people who develop AS have the HLA-B27 gene. Youre more likely to have this gene if you have AS and youre Caucasian. Its also more common in men than women.

Other spondyloarthritic diseases are also associated with the HLA-B27 gene, including:

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is another autoimmune disease that can affect your joints and many types of connective tissue in your body. It can also damage other organs, such as your:

SLE is more common among women, particularly those with African or Asian ancestry. Common symptoms include joint pain and swelling.

Other symptoms include:

You may experience more severe effects as the disease progresses. SLE affects people differently, but starting treatment to try to get it under control as soon as possible and working with your doctor can help you manage this condition.

Gout is a form of arthritis caused by the accumulation of urate crystals inside your joints. High levels of uric acid in your blood may put you at risk of gout.

An estimated 3.9 percent of American adults have gout thats 5.9 percent of American men and 2 percent of American women. Age, diet, alcohol use, and family history can affect your risk of developing gout.

Gout can be incredibly painful. A joint at the base of your big toe is most likely to be affected, although it can potentially affect other joints. You may experience redness, swelling, and intense pain in your:

An acute attack of gout can come on strong within a few hours during the course of a day, but the pain can linger for days to weeks. Gout can become more severe over time. Learn more about the symptoms of gout.

Infectious arthritis is an infection in one of your joints that causes pain or swelling. The infection can be caused by bacteria, viruses, parasites, or fungi. It can start in another part of your body and spread to your joints. This kind of arthritis is often accompanied by a fever and chills.

Reactive arthritis can occur when an infection in one part of your body triggers immune system dysfunction and inflammation in a joint elsewhere in your body. The infection often occurs in your gastrointestinal tract, bladder, or sexual organs.

To diagnose these conditions, your doctor can order tests on samples of your blood, urine, and fluid from inside an affected joint.

Up to 30 percent of those with psoriasis will also have psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Usually, youll experience psoriasis before PsA sets in.

The fingers are most commonly affected, but this painful condition affects other joints as well. Pink-colored fingers that appear sausagelike and pitting and degradation of the fingernails may also occur.

The disease may progress to involve your spine, causing damage similar to that of ankylosing spondylitis.

If you have psoriasis, theres a chance you could also develop PsA. If PsA symptoms start to set in, youll want to see your doctor to treat this as early as you can.

Many other forms of arthritis and other conditions can also cause joint pain. A few examples include:

If youre experiencing joint pain, stiffness, or other symptoms, talk to your doctor. They can help diagnose the cause of your symptoms and recommend a treatment plan. In the meantime, find relief from arthritis pain naturally.

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Common types of arthritis: Location, causes, treatment, and more – Medical News Today

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Arthritis is a painful rheumatic condition that causes joint inflammation. There are many different types of arthritis that can affect the joints and other areas of the body and cause similar symptoms, such as pain, swelling, and stiffness.

There are more than 100 different types of arthritis. Some common types of arthritis include osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA).

Below, we explore these conditions, as well as other diseases that can present with arthritis. We also discuss potential treatment and when to seek medical guidance.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), OA affects over 32.5 million adults in the United States.

Symptoms of OA include:

People often experience OA symptoms in the hips, hands, and knees.

The following increase the likelihood of developing OA:

Learn more about OA here.

RA is an autoimmune condition that causes painful swelling and inflammation in the joints. It typically affects the hands, wrists, and feet.

RA does not only affect joints. It can also cause problems in other organs of the body, including the heart, lungs, and eyes.

While some people experience a sustained progression of the disease, the intensity of symptoms usually comes and goes. Symptoms may include:

Another characteristic of RA is symmetrical involvement. This means pain and signs of inflammation occur on both sides of the body and in the same joints.

RA can cause lasting tissue damage, which can lead to:

Some people who have RA may also need assistance walking.

Some RA risk factors include:

Learn more about RA here.

PsA is an autoimmune condition.

Symptoms of PsA include:

PsA joint involvement is asymmetric, affecting different joints on either side of the body.

This type of arthritis can develop in people with a skin condition called psoriasis, which causes scaly, flushed, or silvery patches of skin. These patches can look different depending on a persons skin color.

Learn more about psoriasis on black skin here.

Researchers still do not fully understand what causes this form of arthritis. However, having a family history of PsA may increase a persons risk of developing this condition.

Learn more about PsA here.

Gout is a type of arthritis that causes painful swelling, often in a single joint at a time.

Symptoms of gout can flare up and go away quickly. They include:

Swelling is common in the big toe. Often, it also affects the knee or ankle joint.

A person may be at higher risk of developing gout if they:

Health conditions that may lead to gout include:

Gout may also occur due to metabolic syndrome, which is not a condition in itself. It refers to a number of characteristics, diseases, or habits that can make a person more likely to experience other health conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, or diabetes.

Learn more about gout here.

This chronic illness is an autoimmune condition that commonly affects females aged 1544 years.

Lupus is not a type of arthritis in itself. However, arthritis is one of the most common symptoms of this condition.

One symptom of lupus is the characteristic butterfly rash that can develop on the face. Other rashes can also develop on the arms, hands, and face. Rashes can worsen after sun exposure.

While symptoms may differ from person to person, they generally include:

Learn more about lupus here.

Juvenile arthritis, also known as childhood arthritis, affects children or even infants.

Symptoms of juvenile arthritis include:

There is no known cause of childhood arthritis. It appears to affect children regardless of race, age, or background.

Learn more about juvenile arthritis here.

Reaching a definitive diagnosis may take time, because many types of arthritis are similar or resemble other conditions.

Typically, a doctor will first check a persons medical and family history. They will also ask about symptoms and perform a physical exam. They may run tests such as:

Arthritis management depends on the type of arthritis. There are different forms of treatment available.

Medical treatment for arthritis may involve:

Surgery may not be necessary for everyone with arthritis. However, it can benefit certain complications of arthritis that result in malalignment of joints and functional limitations due to damaged joints. It can also help with intractable pain, which is when a person experiences pain that is difficult to treat or manage.

Common surgeries for arthritis include:

Physical therapy can be a great option for people with arthritis. It can help ease pain or increase activity.

Behavioral changes that can help with arthritis may include:

Some people find certain home remedies helpful in relieving pain and swelling from certain types of arthritis. These may include:

If a person has experienced joint symptoms that last more than 3 days, they should seek treatment from a healthcare professional.

Similarly, if a person has joint symptoms at different times within a month, they should also contact a doctor.

Medications and other treatments can help a person manage chronic symptoms, such as pain and swelling.

Pain will come and go with many types of arthritis. However, even if the pain resolves, a person should still seek treatment.

It is important to treat arthritis early. If left untreated, some types of arthritis may worsen over time and cause permanent disability.

Arthritis is a painful condition that causes joint inflammation.

Different types of arthritis can cause similar symptoms. It is vital to get the correct diagnosis, as it can help determine most effective treatment options.

The right treatment may also prevent future complications and help a person live a more active life.

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Rheumatoid arthritis drug reduces risk of death for severely ill hospitalized Covid-19 patients, researchers say – CNN

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

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CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/athena-jones-profile" target="_blank">Athena Jonesu003c/a> reports the big question remains as to how well the vaccines protect against the more contagious variants."},{"title":"Jake Tapper presses CDC director on reopening schools","duration":"06:19","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/?refresh=1","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/14/cdc-director-rochelle-walensky-reopening-schools-tapper-sotu-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/14/cdc-director-rochelle-walensky-reopening-schools-tapper-sotu-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210214102132-tapper-walensky-sotu-intv-2-14-21-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/14/cdc-director-rochelle-walensky-reopening-schools-tapper-sotu-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky talks with CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/jake-tapper-profile" target="_blank">Jake Tapperu003c/a> about the guidance to safely reopen US schools. 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"},{"title":"Biden: On track to have vaccines for 300 million Americans by end of July","duration":"01:25","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/11/biden-confirms-200-million-vaccine-doses-secured-sot-tsr-vpx-collins.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/11/biden-confirms-200-million-vaccine-doses-secured-sot-tsr-vpx-collins.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210211174203-joe-biden-february-11-2021-01-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/11/biden-confirms-200-million-vaccine-doses-secured-sot-tsr-vpx-collins.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"President Joe Biden announced that the US is on track to have enough Covid-19 vaccines for 300 million Americans by the end of July after securing 100 million more Covid-19 vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer.","descriptionText":"President Joe Biden announced that the US is on track to have enough Covid-19 vaccines for 300 million Americans by the end of July after securing 100 million more Covid-19 vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer."},{"title":"Wonder Woman, Harry Potter and others mask up in new PSA","duration":"00:41","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/us/2021/02/10/psa-mask-up-america-cdc-face-mask-covid-19-orig-mg.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"us/2021/02/10/psa-mask-up-america-cdc-face-mask-covid-19-orig-mg.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210210153138-psa-mask-up-america-cdc-face-mask-covid-19-orig-mg-00002216-large-169.png","videoUrl":"/videos/us/2021/02/10/psa-mask-up-america-cdc-face-mask-covid-19-orig-mg.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"The Ad Council, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WarnerMedia partnered to release a new PSA that features some of Hollywood's most iconic characters sporting face masks.","descriptionText":"The Ad Council, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and WarnerMedia partnered to release a new PSA that features some of Hollywood's most iconic characters sporting face masks."},{"title":"US records lowest daily Covid-19 case count in 3 months","duration":"02:06","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/08/coronavirus-daily-wrap-cases-dropping-contagious-variants-watt-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/08/coronavirus-daily-wrap-cases-dropping-contagious-variants-watt-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210206023014-us-coronavirus-013121-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/08/coronavirus-daily-wrap-cases-dropping-contagious-variants-watt-dnt-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN's Nick Watt reports on the concern over more contagious coronavirus variants despite the encouraging news that the US daily case count hit it's lowest number in 3 months. ","descriptionText":"CNN's Nick Watt reports on the concern over more contagious coronavirus variants despite the encouraging news that the US daily case count hit it's lowest number in 3 months. "},{"title":"CNN reporter breaks down racial disparities in Covid-19 vaccinations","duration":"03:08","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/08/hispanic-communities-coronavirus-vaccine-jimenez-pkg-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/08/hispanic-communities-coronavirus-vaccine-jimenez-pkg-nr-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210205063935-file-astrazeneca-covid-19-vaccine-trial-south-africa-2020-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/08/hispanic-communities-coronavirus-vaccine-jimenez-pkg-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN'su003ca href="/profiles/omar-jimenez" target="_blank"> Omar Jimenezu003c/a> reports on the racial disparities in Covid-19 vaccinations, focusing specifically on the Latinx community in Chicago. ","descriptionText":"CNN'su003ca href="/profiles/omar-jimenez" target="_blank"> Omar Jimenezu003c/a> reports on the racial disparities in Covid-19 vaccinations, focusing specifically on the Latinx community in Chicago. "},{"title":"More Covid-19 vaccination sites opening across the US","duration":"02:44","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/05/coronavirus-pandemic-vaccine-more-sites-us-hill-pkg-tsr.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/05/coronavirus-pandemic-vaccine-more-sites-us-hill-pkg-tsr.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210202161253-01-vaccination-line-la-0128-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/05/coronavirus-pandemic-vaccine-more-sites-us-hill-pkg-tsr.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"More mass coronavirus vaccination sites are popping up across the country as the pandemic continues, including sports arenas like Doger Stadium in Los Angeles. CNN's Erica Hill reports.","descriptionText":"More mass coronavirus vaccination sites are popping up across the country as the pandemic continues, including sports arenas like Doger Stadium in Los Angeles. CNN's Erica Hill reports."},{"title":"How the NFL managed the coronavirus pandemic","duration":"04:13","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/05/super-bowl-coronavirus-nfl-gupta-dnt-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/05/super-bowl-coronavirus-nfl-gupta-dnt-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200902114954-nfl-logo-file-2019-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/05/super-bowl-coronavirus-nfl-gupta-dnt-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/sanjay-gupta-profile" target="_blank">Dr. Sanjay Guptau003c/a> talks to Dr. Allen Sills, chief medical officer for the NFL, about how the league was able to start and finish its season mostly without igniting major Covid-19 outbreaks.","descriptionText":"CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/sanjay-gupta-profile" target="_blank">Dr. Sanjay Guptau003c/a> talks to Dr. Allen Sills, chief medical officer for the NFL, about how the league was able to start and finish its season mostly without igniting major Covid-19 outbreaks."},{"title":"Covid-19 cases declining across US but deaths remain high","duration":"02:57","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/04/coronavirus-vaccine-uk-variant-kafanov-pkg-vpx-tsr.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/04/coronavirus-vaccine-uk-variant-kafanov-pkg-vpx-tsr.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210130201844-02-coronavirus-outbreak-210127-new-york-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/04/coronavirus-vaccine-uk-variant-kafanov-pkg-vpx-tsr.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CDC Director Rochelle Walensky says increasing data suggests the UK coronavirus variant may be deadlier than the original strain. CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/lucy-kafanov" target="_blank">Lucy Kafanovu003c/a> reports. ","descriptionText":"CDC Director Rochelle Walensky says increasing data suggests the UK coronavirus variant may be deadlier than the original strain. CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/lucy-kafanov" target="_blank">Lucy Kafanovu003c/a> reports. "},{"title":"Nurse: One of the worst things is the fear in patients' eyes","duration":"04:07","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/05/texas-hospitals-coronavirus-surge-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/05/texas-hospitals-coronavirus-surge-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210204195137-texas-hospitals-lavandera-pkg-vpx-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/05/texas-hospitals-coronavirus-surge-lavandera-pkg-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"The number of people hospitalized in Texas by the coronavirus reached record highs in recent weeks. CNN's Ed Lavandera reports. ","descriptionText":"The number of people hospitalized in Texas by the coronavirus reached record highs in recent weeks. CNN's Ed Lavandera reports. "},{"title":"Mindfulness coach offers tips for maintaining mental health","duration":"02:48","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/04/mental-health-mindfulness-during-pandemic-ctw-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/04/mental-health-mindfulness-during-pandemic-ctw-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210204124348-tamara-levitt-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/04/mental-health-mindfulness-during-pandemic-ctw-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"Calm app narrator and Head of Mindfulness Tamara Levitt tells CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/becky-anderson-profile" target="_blank">Becky Andersonu003c/a> why limiting stress is an important part of staying healthy during the Covid-19 pandemic.","descriptionText":"Calm app narrator and Head of Mindfulness Tamara Levitt tells CNN's u003ca href="http://www.cnn.com/profiles/becky-anderson-profile" target="_blank">Becky Andersonu003c/a> why limiting stress is an important part of staying healthy during the Covid-19 pandemic."},{"title":"Why health experts are advising against Super Bowl parties","duration":"01:58","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/03/coronavirus-super-bowl-parties-wrap-nr-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/03/coronavirus-super-bowl-parties-wrap-nr-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210203154734-cdc-expert-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/03/coronavirus-super-bowl-parties-wrap-nr-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN's u003ca href="/profiles/erica-hill-profile" target="_blank">Erica Hillu003c/a> reports that health experts are strongly encouraging people to take precaution while watching the Super Bowl and avoid large gatherings.","descriptionText":"CNN's u003ca href="/profiles/erica-hill-profile" target="_blank">Erica Hillu003c/a> reports that health experts are strongly encouraging people to take precaution while watching the Super Bowl and avoid large gatherings."},{"title":"Dr. Fauci reveals he often double masks","duration":"01:40","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/03/anthony-fauci-double-masking-nr-sot-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/03/anthony-fauci-double-masking-nr-sot-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210203123600-dr-anthony-fauci-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/03/anthony-fauci-double-masking-nr-sot-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"During a White House Covid-19 briefing, Dr. Anthony Fauci said that although the CDC has not yet outlined specific guidelines regarding the trend of wearing two masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, he often double masks.","descriptionText":"During a White House Covid-19 briefing, Dr. Anthony Fauci said that although the CDC has not yet outlined specific guidelines regarding the trend of wearing two masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, he often double masks."},{"title":"Mom who gave birth while in a coma finally meets her son","duration":"02:14","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/shows/morning-express","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/03/miracle-mom-meets-baby-wisconsin-coronavirus-mxp-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/03/miracle-mom-meets-baby-wisconsin-coronavirus-mxp-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210203105700-kelsy-townsend-wisconsin-mom-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/03/miracle-mom-meets-baby-wisconsin-coronavirus-mxp-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"Kelsey Townsend was in a medically-induced coma, fighting Covid-19, when her son was born. Months later, this "miracle mom" finally gets to go home and meet her new baby.","descriptionText":"Kelsey Townsend was in a medically-induced coma, fighting Covid-19, when her son was born. Months later, this "miracle mom" finally gets to go home and meet her new baby."},{"title":"CNN correspondent on demographics of vaccine distribution","duration":"02:14","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/02/coronavirus-vaccination-wrap-watt-newsroom-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/02/coronavirus-vaccination-wrap-watt-newsroom-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210202161253-01-vaccination-line-la-0128-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/02/coronavirus-vaccination-wrap-watt-newsroom-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN's Nick Watt looks at the vaccine efforts across the US and how the vaccine is being distributed among different segments of the population.","descriptionText":"CNN's Nick Watt looks at the vaccine efforts across the US and how the vaccine is being distributed among different segments of the population."},{"title":"Why many Black Americans are hesitant to get Covid-19 vaccine","duration":"03:36","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"https://www.cnn.com/","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/health/2021/02/02/black-american-hesitancy-coronavirus-vaccine-young-lead-dnt-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"health/2021/02/02/black-american-hesitancy-coronavirus-vaccine-young-lead-dnt-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/210201183747-01-coronavirus-vaccine-washington-0126-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/health/2021/02/02/black-american-hesitancy-coronavirus-vaccine-young-lead-dnt-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"CNN's Ryan Young explains why many Black Americans are hesitant to take the Covid-19 vaccine and the historical significance behind this reluctance. ","descriptionText":"CNN's Ryan Young explains why many Black Americans are hesitant to take the Covid-19 vaccine and the historical significance behind this reluctance. "}],'js-video_headline-featured-8i2fmr','',"js-video_source-featured-8i2fmr",true,true,'coronavirus');if (typeof configObj.context !== 'string' || configObj.context.length

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Rheumatoid arthritis drug reduces risk of death for severely ill hospitalized Covid-19 patients, researchers say - CNN

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UM Today | Rady Faculty of Health Sciences | On the path to preventing rheumatoid arthritis – UM Today

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

February 9, 2021

After watching a close family member suffer with rheumatoid arthritis, Vidyanand Anaparti [PhD/15] was motivated to make a difference.

In 2015, Anaparti joined Max Rady College of Medicine professor Dr. Hani El-Gabalawys research program which focuses on discovering the origins of rheumatoid arthritis. Since then, Anapartis work has been recognized and was listed as one of the Arthritis Societys Top 10 Research Advances of 2020.

I understand the pain my family member goes through every single day, said Anaparti, a postdoctoral fellow in internal medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences. If Im able to prevent at least one person from getting the condition, I will think that my research is successful.

When Anaparti joined El-Gabalawys team, he was tasked with researching the cellular switches that turn genes on and off.

Anaparti studied First Nations people, who have elevated rates of rheumatoid arthritis, to figure out what factors precede or aid in the onset of the chronic disease. One of the factors is cellular switches called microRNAs. Anaparti was interested in people who had levels of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA), a type of autoantibody whose levels are routinely measured to assess the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis.

Anaparti found that the first-degree relatives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have altered levels of certain microRNAs and these individuals exhibit a microRNA expression pattern similar to rheumatoid arthritis patients. Anaparti found that altered microRNA expression in ACPA-positive first-degree relatives is consistent over time and how theyre expressed varies depending on the type of immune cell.

We were able to detect these microRNAs in people years before they developed rheumatoid arthritis, Anaparti said. We have the potential to identify individuals before they become a patient.

Another discovery that Anaparti made was that the methylation, a cellular switch, of specific genes in rheumatoid arthritis patients was different from healthy people and might play a crucial role in the diseases development. He also identified that the levels of some metabolic markers are shifted in at-risk, ACPA-positive first-degree relatives of people with the chronic inflammatory disorder.

Anaparti also found that methylation and microRNAs have a direct influence on the expression of certain genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis.

He has published his findings in reputed journals, including Arthritis & Rheumatology and Arthritis Research & Therapy. His research has been funded by Research Manitoba, Arthritis Society of Canada and Health Sciences Centre Foundation.

Vidyanand is a bright and creative scientist who is meticulous in his experimental approach, El-Gabalawy said. He is an integral part of our human immunology research team and is an excellent mentor for trainees in our lab.

Using data generated from Anapartis research over the last five years, El-Gabalawys team has secured funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for a project focused on rheumatoid arthritis in First Nations people that will include a clinical trial to see whether the combination of turmeric, omega-3 and vitamin D can reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

Currently in the lab, Anaparti is working on advancing his findings on microRNA by trying to understand their biological role.

The ultimate objective is to prevent people from getting rheumatoid arthritis, Anaparti said. All of this research, all of this understanding, is a step forward in the right direction.

Matthew Kruchak

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UM Today | Rady Faculty of Health Sciences | On the path to preventing rheumatoid arthritis - UM Today

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Arthritis treatment: Curcumin improves pain, physical function, and quality of life – Express

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

In the UK, more than 10 million people have arthritis or other, similar conditions that affect the joints. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the UK, affecting nearly nine million people. As the NHS explains, osteoarthritis initially affects the smooth cartilage lining of the joint.

A review published in the journal Dovepress aimed to summarise the anti-osteoarthritic effects of curcumin derived from clinical and preclinical studies.

Many clinical trials had been conducted to determine the effectiveness of curcumin in osteoarthritic patients.

According to the review, patients with osteoarthritis showed improvement in pain, physical function, and quality of life after taking curcumin.

To arrive at this conclusion, a total of 15 relevant clinical studies on the effects of curcumin supplementation on osteoarthritic patients were retrieved.

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While some food items are anti-inflammatory, others can make osteoarthritis worse so are best to be avoided.

According to the British Dietetic Association (BDA), Several popular diet books on arthritis advocate avoiding foods such as dairy products or the nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, potatoes, bell peppers and aubergines).

"Though there is some evidence that food avoidance may help rheumatoid arthritis patients, there is no evidence of benefit in osteoarthritis patients," says the BDA.

Diet is not the only remedy for osteoarthritis - exercise can help too.

Although it may seem counterintuitive, research shows that people can and should exercise when they have osteoarthritis.

"In fact, exercise is considered the most effective, non-drug treatment for reducing pain and improving movement in patients with osteoarthritis," explains the Arthritis Foundation (AF).

Different types of exercise play a role in maintaining and improving the ability to move and function.

According to the AF, walking and aquatic exercises are particularly good for most people with osteoarthritis.

As the health body explains, aerobic exercise also reduces fatigue and builds stamina, while helping control weight by increasing the number of calories the body uses.

This is important because excess weight can place pressure on the joints, amplifying symptoms.

Examples of this type of exercise includes walking, jogging, bicycling, swimming or using the elliptical machine.

Other exercises for osteoarthritis include:

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Arthritis treatment: Curcumin improves pain, physical function, and quality of life - Express

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JNK pathway-associated phosphatase associates with rheumatoid arthritis risk, disease activity, and its longitudinal elevation relates to etanercept…

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Background:This study aimed to investigate the relationship of serum JNK pathway-associated phosphatase (JKAP) expression with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) risk and clinical features, also to explore the longitudinal change of JKAP during etanercept treatment and its relationship with etanercept treatment response in RA patients.

Methods:A total of 87 RA patients and 44 healthy controls (HCs) were enrolled; then, their JKAP expression in serum was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among 87 RA patients, 42 cases further received the 24-week etanercept treatment; then, their JKAP level in serum (detected by ELISA) and clinical response (evaluated by disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28) score) were evaluated at week 4 (W4), week 12 (W12), and week 24 (W24) after initiation of etanercept treatment.

Results:JKAP expression was decreased in RA patients compared to HCs, which disclosed a good predictive value for RA risk. JKAP expression was negatively associated with tender joint count, swollen joint count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and DAS28 in RA patients, respectively. For RA patients who received 24-week etanercept treatment, their clinical response rate was 0.0%, 33.3%, 50.0%, and 69% at W0, W4, W12, and W24, respectively. Importantly, JKAP was gradually increased during etanercept treatment, whose longitudinal elevation positively related to etanercept treatment response in RA patients.

Conclusion:Circulating JKAP links with decreased RA risk and mild disease activity, whose longitudinal elevation positively relates to etanercept treatment response.

Keywords:JNK pathway-associated phosphatase; disease risk; disease severity; etanercept treatment; rheumatoid arthritis.

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JNK pathway-associated phosphatase associates with rheumatoid arthritis risk, disease activity, and its longitudinal elevation relates to etanercept...

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Long Covid could create burden on NHS equivalent to arthritis – iNews

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Cases of long Covid could put the NHS under pressure for many years to come, an expert has warned.

Danny Altmann, professor of immunology at Imperial College London, said people experiencing long-term symptoms of coronavirus could become a burden on the health service equivalent to arthritis.

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Prof Altmann said arthritis is currently the biggest cause on our NHS time and expenditure but said long Covid risked eclipsing it by taking up even more resources.

He was asked on Times Radio whetherlongCovidwould become less of an issue as fewer people become severely ill from coronavirus, to which he replied: Probably not.

I think for me the rule of thumb at the moment looking at thelongCovidcases is theres no absolute correlation with how severe your initial attack was, Prof. Altmann added.

So theres plenty of people out there who barely know they had it and never had a PCR test or antibody test who are suffering massively still fromlongCovid.

It really worries me, the kind of burden Ive been suggesting is equivalent to our NHS burden of arthritis, which is one of the biggest cause on our NHS time and expenditure.

Its a real thing to worry and think about for the future, for patients and healthcare planning.

Long-Covid patients have complained of persistent fatigue, shortness of breath and problems with memory lasting for months after they were initially infected.

And Prof Altmann said the number of patients reporting symptoms ofCovid-19 weeks after becoming ill could be as high as 20 per cent.

He added that a figure of one in 20 people sufferinglongCovid, reported in October by Kings College London, is lower than what is now being reported.

Many people would have 10-20 per cent as their range if you look at the papers on how many people are still reporting significant symptoms several months afterwards, he continued.

Prof Altmann urged the Government to consider openinglongCovidclinics to dealing with the increased pressure on the NHS.

He recently made the case at a World Health Organisation meeting for mechanisms to be in place for people to be referred to relevant specialists.

The point I was trying to make was really a call to arms for some really good solid research and mechanisms here, because theres no point just having the banner above the clinic if we havent got the doctors to sit in them, he continued.

Prof Altmann warned that there is no absolute correlation between severe illness andlongCovid.

He added: Theres plenty of people out there who barely know they had it and never had a PCR test or antibody test who are suffering massively still fromlongCovid.

Additional reporting byPress Association

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Long Covid could create burden on NHS equivalent to arthritis - iNews

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McGill researchers are shaping the future of arthritis treatment – McGill Tribune

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Arthritis has been one of the most common health conditions in Canada for years, affecting people of all ages with symptoms including joint stiffness and painful inflammation. While there is no known cure, researchers are hoping to find more effective ways to treat and manage arthritis. The Arthritis Society of Canada compiles a list of the top 10 research advances each year, highlighting breakthroughs with promising results. The list for 2020 includes two McGill-led projects supervised by Dr. Hosni Cherif and Dr. Ins Colmegna.

Zombie cells and spinal degradation

Osteoarthritis is one of the most common forms of arthritis worldwide, and is caused by the deterioration of joint cartilagetissues that cushion the ends of bones. Cherif, a postdoctoral fellow in McGills Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, led a research project on spinal osteoarthritis.

My research goal is to understand how intervertebral discs and joints degenerate leading to axial osteoarthritis, and the associated chronic pain, Cherif wrote in an email to The McGill Tribune.

In particular, Cherif studied the role of senescent cells, often known as zombie cells, which permanently stop dividing but continue to age and evade death.

Cytokines, also known as cellular signalling molecules, are typically involved in aiding the immune response at a site of inflammation, but the accumulation of these molecules can cause degradation of the spine.

[The] accumulation of senescent cells increases cytokine production and inflammationleading to the development ofintervertebral disc degeneration, Cherif wrote.

Cherifs team identified a synthetic drug, RG-7112, and a natural compound, o-Vanillin, capable of eliminating zombie cells while allowing healthy ones to proliferate. The combination of these molecules has the potential to target inflammation in the spine, thereby reducing the associated chronic pain.

This will lead to better management or the alleviation of persistent pain to improve the quality of life of patients with osteoarthritis, Cherif wrote.

Currently, Cherif is expanding his research in drug discovery to treat spinal osteoarthritis by testing out the signalling pathways of other senotherapeutic agents, molecules that specifically target cellular senescence.

Understanding the mechanism of cellular senescence and disc degradation will facilitate [the] development of novel disease-modifying drugs, Cherif wrote.

The more the better: High dose vaccine protection

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune type of arthritis in which the immune response mistakenly targets host cells, causing joint damage and inflammation. This makes patients more vulnerable to the adverse effects of viruses such as influenza.

Colmegna, an assistant professor working in the Division of Rheumatology at the McGill University Health Centre, led a study focussing on the implications of influenza infections in RA patients.

Specifically, Colmegna studied the effect on antibody production of a standard dose of the influenza vaccine versus a high dose in those with RA. Antibodies are molecular markers that recognize and bind to foreign invaders, signalling their presence to the immune system and initiating an immunological response.

The findings of our study indicate that compared with the standard dose influenza vaccine, RA patients who receive the high-dose are two to three times more likely to generate protective antibodies against the influenza virus, Colmegna wrote in an email to The McGill Tribune. This may be associated with a reduced risk of developing influenza.

By increasing the likelihood of generating more antibodies against influenza, the higher dose increases the effectiveness of the bodys response to infection.

This study is the first of its kind to show that it is possible for those with RA to achieve better protection against influenza by using an existing high dose vaccine.

Canadian guidelines recommend that RA patients receive an annual standard dose influenza vaccine, Colmegna wrote. However, many RA patients do not generate protective antibodies post-vaccination [.] With this approach, a larger number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis might be protected against influenza, a disease that in these patients is associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

Colmegna hopes that her research findings will increase the availability of high dose vaccines to better protect RA patients against the influenza virus.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Market Comprehensive Growth: Global Industry Trends, Share, Size, Growth, Opportunity and Forecast 2020-2026 KSU | The…

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Market

The global Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Market report look through various tendencies, obstructions, and challenges faced by the key competitors of Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs market. The report has been prepared in consideration of the major outcomes and consequences of the market.

Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs market was valued at USD XXX million in 2019, and it is expected to reach a value of USD XXX million by 2026, at a CAGR of XX % over the forecast period 2021-2026. Correspondingly, the forecast analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs industry comprises of Asia, North America, South America, Middle East and Africa, Europe, with the production and revenue data in each of the sub-segments.The Merck aims at producing XX Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs in 2020, with XX % production to take place in global market, Novartis accounts for a volume share of XX %.

This report examines the Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs market status and the potential of global and major regions, from angles of players, product regions and end Application/industries; this report assesses the key players in global and major regions and classifies the Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs market by product and Application/end industries.

Merck, Novartis, Pfizer, J&J, BMS, Abbvie, Boehringer Ingelheim, AstraZeneca, MedImmune, Takeda, Biogen Idec, Celgene, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Celltrion

HospitalsClinicsHome CareOther

Major Type of Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs CoveredNSAIDsDMARDsCorticosteroidsAnalgesicsOther

The major objective of this Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Industry report is to assist the user get to know the market, understand its definition, segmentation, influential trends, market potential, and the challenges that the market is going through. Profound researches and analysis over the course of the formulation of the report. This report will help the users to understand the market in detail. The facts and the information in respect to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs market are taken from authentic sources as like journals, websites, annual reports of the companies, and others and were reviewed and validated by the industry experts. The data and facts are illustrated in the report using graphs, pie charts, diagrams, and other pictorial representations. This enhances the visual representation and assures understanding the facts in a better way.

The Regional and country-level analysis of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Drugs Market, by end-use.

The Detailed analysis and profiles of additional market players.

About Us:We, Regal Intelligence, aim to change the dynamics of market research backed by quality data. Our analysts validate data with exclusive qualitative and analytics driven intelligence. We meticulously plan our research process and execute in order to explore the potential market for getting insightful details. Our prime focus is to provide reliable data based on public surveys using data analytics techniques. If you have come here, you might be interested in highly reliable data driven market insights for your product/service,reach us here 24/7.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Hand Deformities: What to Do – Healthline

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2021

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that damages joints and ligaments when the immune system attacks the bodys own tissues.

While the inflammation caused by RA can occur throughout your body, the effects of the disease are often most noticeable in the hands of people with RA.

This damage can result in twisted joints, gnarled ligaments, and ultimately destruction of the joints in later stages of the disease.

Joint deformities in people diagnosed with RA are becoming less frequent and less severe, thanks to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatments.

However, in addition to being painful, these changes in the hands can make it difficult to perform everyday tasks.

A major misconception about RA is that its solely a joint disease, according to Alejandro Badia, MD, FACS, founder of the Badia Hand and Shoulder Center in Miami, Florida.

Its largely a disease of the soft tissues, he explained. This includes ligaments and tendons, he said, although joints also are severely affected.

Thats especially true in your hands. They contain a large number of small bones, called phalanges and metacarpals, that are connected by joints. These joints are responsible for movement of your fingers.

In people with RA, the lining of these joints, called the synovium, is attacked by immune system cells. The synovium normally produces fluid that allows the joints to smoothly glide on their cartilage covers.

When inflammation causes the synovium to swell, a fibrous layer of abnormal tissue, called pannus, forms. In turn, this releases chemicals that cause:

The destruction makes ligaments and joint capsules dense, fibrous connective tissue that forms a sleeve around the joint less able to support the joints. This causes joints to lose their shape and alignment.

As a result, your joints:

People with RA generally have high levels of acute phase reactants C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) which are markers of inflammation in the body.

People with RA can also demonstrate positive antibodies, such as the rheumatoid factor (RF) and cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies. The presence of anti-CCP antibodies is associated with a risk of more severe disease.

Individuals with RA may experience different types of hand conditions, depending on the rate and manner in which their joints and ligaments deteriorate due to the disease.

All of these changes result from the inflammatory destruction to the joints of the fingers that occur with arthritis, causing increased pain, stiffness, swelling, and limited functional use of the hand for gripping, grasping, and pinching, said Kristen Gasnick, PT, DPT, whose outpatient rehabilitation practice includes people with RA.

The most common manifestations of RA-caused hand concerns identified by researchers include the following:

Boutonniere deformity occurs when the middle or proximal interphalangeal joint of a finger is flexed and the distal joint is extended.

Swan-neck deformity, the most common change in people with RA, occurs when theres weakness or tearing of a ligament due to inflammation. This results in laxity of the middle joint of the finger and flexion of the distal joint.

Hitchhikers thumb occurs when the thumb flexes at the metacarpophalangeal joint (connecting the thumb to the palm of the hand) and hyperextends at the interphalangeal joint (the one just below your thumbnail).

This is sometimes also called the Z-shaped deformity.

Rheumatoid nodules are hard lumps that form under the skin near the joints. These are another common symptom of RA in the hands.

They can also occur in multiple areas, most commonly near your elbows. The nodules usually arent painful or debilitating, but some people might not like how they look.

Less common among people with RA are Heberden nodes and Bouchard nodes. These are visible bumps at the joints that are more typical of osteoarthritis.

The availability of effective drugs that limit the progression of RA has helped reduce the severity of RA-related hand deformities.

Known as disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), some of the medications commonly prescribed to treat RA include:

A subset of DMARDs, called biologic response modifiers, specifically target the areas of the immune system that trigger inflammation and joint damage.

These are usually prescribed in combination with other RA medications. Some examples include:

In some cases, rheumatoid nodules have been found to be more common among people receiving methotrexate treatment. They may be reduced in size by changing medications, receiving corticosteroid injections, or undergoing surgery.

In general, occupational therapy, including exercise and splinting, can slow the progression of hand deformities caused by RA. It can also improve function of your hands, fingers, and wrists.

Splints, including specially designed rings, can be used to stabilize affected finger joints.

Surgery is no longer common for people with RA because of the effectiveness of current treatment options. Plus, RA-related nodules often return after surgery.

However, surgery may be required to correct severe hand conditions. Options include finger joint replacement surgery, which is similar to the replacement surgery more commonly performed on knees and hips.

Such surgery can restore some functionality in the joints and improve appearance, although it doesnt cure the underlying RA condition.

Wrist surgery may be used to reduce ligament tension on the fingers. The wrist also can be surgically fused to keep it straight and reduce pain, although this results in loss of strength and function.

Wrist replacement surgery is an alternative for people with RA that may result in greater retention of wrist motion.

The damage from the systematic inflammation caused by RA can be particularly visible, painful, and debilitating in your wrists and hands.

However, joint deformities are less common than they used to be as a result of early diagnosis and the availability of more effective treatments, such as DMARDs and biologic response modifiers.

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What is the best diet for rheumatoid arthritis? – Medical News Today

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2021

There is no specific diet for people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, scientists believe that some foods may help ease the swelling that causes pain and stiffness.

This article explains what RA is and looks at some of the foods that might help relieve the symptoms. It also investigates whether some foods make RA worse and highlights some other ways that people can manage their symptoms.

RA is an autoimmune condition. This means that a malfunction of the immune system causes it.

More specifically, RA occurs when the bodys natural defenses attack the joints. This leads to painful swelling called inflammation. RA usually affects the joints in the hands, wrists, and knees. Sometimes, it can affect several joints at once.

The symptoms include painful aching or stiffness in the joints. People may feel extremely tired and weak, and occasionally, the condition can cause a low grade fever. Over time, RA can damage the joints permanently.

RA is a chronic, long-term condition, and there is currently no cure. Most people will have periods of remission, during which they have few or no symptoms. Other times, their symptoms will get worse. Doctors call these periods flare-ups.

People with RA can usually manage the condition by taking medications and making certain lifestyle changes.

Some experts believe that diet can help prevent flare-ups and manage the symptoms of RA. There is no specific diet that research has shown to help people with RA, but some foods may help control the painful swelling and support the immune system.

According to the Arthritis Foundation, many of these foods are part of the Mediterranean diet. They include:

Salmon, tuna, sardines, and anchovies are all rich in omega-3 fatty acids. According to the Arthritis Foundation, these fat molecules help fight the inflammation that causes joint pain in RA.

Fruits and vegetables are rich in antioxidants, which support the immune system. The fiber in fruits and vegetables may also help reduce inflammation.

Some of the best sources of antioxidants include blueberries, blackberries, cherries, strawberries, spinach, kale, onions, and broccoli.

Olive oil contains antioxidants, polyphenols, oleuropein, and oleocanthal. According to preclinical studies, these compounds have anti-arthritic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Nuts and seeds are useful for fighting inflammation. Walnuts, pine nuts, pistachios, and almonds are great sources of monounsaturated fat, protein, and fiber.

Experts recommend eating around one handful of nuts and seeds per day.

Beans are packed with antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds, including:

People with RA could try adding pinto beans, black beans, red kidney beans, or chickpeas to their diet.

Fiber is very important for heart and gut health. It can also help lower inflammation.

Some food sources of fiber include:

The Arthritis Foundation note that fats play a role in inflammation. As a result, people with RA should try to avoid trans fats. These are often present in baked goods, margarine, and fried foods.

Fats that people with RA should try to limit include:

Processed foods such as some ready-made meals, fast food, and cookies are often high in these fats. It is best to avoid these food items as much as possible.

The Arthritis Foundation also recommend that people with RA remove nightshade vegetables from their diet for 2 weeks to see whether or not they notice any difference in their RA symptoms.

Nightshade vegetables include eggplant, tomatoes, peppers, and potatoes. However, scientists need to do more research to investigate this theory before drawing any conclusions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer the following advice to people living with RA.

Many community and patient advocacy groups offer RA self-management courses and workshops. These tend to be free or inexpensive to attend.

During these workshops, people usually learn ways to manage pain, exercise safely, and stay in control of their condition.

When a person has RA, getting regular physical activity eases pain and helps the joints work better. It can also help people with the condition stay healthier for longer.

The CDC recommend getting at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity every week.

Having excess weight places pressure on the joints. In turn, this can make RA pain worse and prevent people from being active.

Losing just 1 pound (lb) (0.45 kilograms [kg]) of body weight will take 4 lb (1.8 kg) of pressure off the knee joints, for example.

The best way to lose weight and keep it off is by eating a healthful, balanced diet and exercising regularly.

People with RA should speak with a healthcare provider regularly. There are lots of treatment and management strategies available.

By working with their doctor, people with RA can usually maintain a high quality of life.

There is currently no cure for RA. It is a long-term condition that causes painful swelling in the joints.

Some scientists believe that certain foods can help with the symptoms. This is because some foods contain antioxidants, which support the immune system. Others contain compounds that may fight inflammation.

Some other ways to manage the symptoms of RA include staying active and maintaining a moderate weight.

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Patients With Early Arthritis May Need Tailored Treatments – Medscape

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2021

Patients with early, undifferentiated arthritis may benefit from milder or stronger treatments, depending on the number of their risk factors for developing rheumatoid arthritis, researchers say.

If the finding is borne out by further research, clinicians could consider treating some of these patients with hydroxychloroquine, steroids, or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) rather than methotrexate, said Pascal de Jong, MD, PhD, a rheumatologist at Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands

"Maybe those patients with fewer risk factors should get less intensive treatment," he told Medscape Medical News. The study by de Jong and colleagues was published online January 23 in Rheumatology.

The European Alliance of Associations for Rheumatology recommends starting treatment with methotrexate for patients who are at risk for persistent arthritis, which it says is "factually synonymous" with rheumatoid arthritis.

But these recommendations are based on studies involving patients with established rheumatoid arthritis, de Jong said.

In an earlier study, he and his colleagues found that hydroxychloroquine can be just as effective as methotrexate for patients newly diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis who dont have autoantibodies. This led them to wonder whether their findings might apply to some subgroups of patients with early arthritis.

As an initial test of this idea, they identified 130 patients from the Rotterdam Early Arthritis Cohort (tREACH) trial who had at least one swollen joint but who did meet the diagnostic criteria for rheumatoid arthritis.

They sorted the patients into groups on the basis of the number of risk factors for persistent arthritis. The risk factors were autoantibody positivity (rheumatoid factor and/or anticitrullinated protein antibody), polyarthritis (more than four swollen joints), erosive disease, and elevations in levels of acute-phase reactants.

Thirty-one patients had none of these risk factors, 66 patients had one risk factor, and the remaining 33 patients had at least two risk factors.

After 2 years of follow-up, 74% of the patients who had had no risk factors had recovered from their arthritis and had not taken disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for at least 6 months (DMARD-free remission). Among the patients who had had one risk factor, 48% achieved DMARD-free remission.Among those who had had two risk factors, 45% achieved DMARD-free remission. The differences between the group that had had no risk factors and the other two groups were statistically significant (P < .05).

The researchers found that those patients who had been experiencing their symptoms for fewer than 6 months were more likely to achieve disease-free remission.

They also sorted patients into different groups on the basis of the treatments they received. One group of 30 comprised all patients who had been initially treated with methotrexate and included patients who had also received other drugs. One group of 40 received hydroxychloroquine initially, and one group of 60 comprised patients who had received no DMARDs initially and included those who had received NSAIDs or glucocorticoids.

There was no statistically significant difference in DMARD-free remission rates among the treatment groups. However, among those patients who were not treated initially with DMARDs, the chance of sustaining DMARD-free remission for more than a year was lower in comparison with the patients who received methotrexate initially (odds ratio, 4.28; 95% CI, 1.34 13.72; P < .05).

Those patients who had fewer baseline risk factors were more likely to have their medication dosages tapered, and they were at lower risk for flares. Patients with more risk factors were more likely to require an intensificiation of treatment, such as with the use of biologicals.

Methotrexate is more likely to cause side effectssuch as nausea, fatigue, and hair loss than hydroxychloroquine, de Jong said. "If the medication is better tolerated, it also influences the compliance of the patient," he said.

The study could help rheumatologists determine which patients need the most aggressive treatment, agreed Kevin Deane, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, Division of Rheumatology, the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, Colorado. "That's a common clinical problem," he said. "Somebody comes in with sort of mild arthritis, and you don't quite know what it is yet."

But he added that more research is needed to understand what treatment works best for those patients whose arthritis has not yet been differentiated. Primary care physicians who suspect inflammatory arthritis should refer their patients to rheumatologists and should test for rheumatoid factors and anticyclic citrullinated peptide, Deane said.

The authors and Deane have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Rheumatology. Published online January 23, 2021. Full text

Laird Harrison writes about science, health and culture. His work has appeared in magazines, newspapers, and online publications. He is at work on a novel about alternate realities in physics. Harrison has taught writing at San Francisco State University, UC Berkeley Extension, and the Writers Grotto. Visit him at lairdharrison.comor follow him on Twitter: @LairdH.

For more news, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

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Fresh perspective in dealing with arthritis – Natural Products INSIDER

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2021

One of the most common ailments afflicting modern society is the presence of joint pain, largely in knees but also experienced in hips and shoulders. While much of this discomfort can be attributed to repetitive motion compression brought on by either weight or gravity (e.g., repetitive running, weightlifting), a new perspective is offered in potentially alleviating the symptoms of bursitis or arthritis.

To understand how to deal with the joint pain, stiffness or soreness associated with arthritis, one first needs to recognize what is going on, or how the problem started. Multiple forms of arthritis exist, with osteoarthritis (OA) developing due to age and wear and tear within the joint, versus rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is considered an autoimmune disease.

The symptoms of arthritis generally include stiffness and joint pain. The treatments commonly selected for nonprescription use are either the analgesics (aspirin or acetaminophen based) or are of a category of agents known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Topical applications with pharmaceutical compounds are also deployed to provide topical relief through transdermal action. In certain acute cases, corticosteroids are deployed either orally or by direct injection into the affected site where the pain is isolated.

New development in the past few years centers on disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) designed to reduce a hyperactive immune or inflammatory process. The latest approach, which seems to have achieved wider acceptance, is the concept of introducing platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in regenerative medicine into the affected joints.

In addition to promising PRP therapies, research of natural products has yielded some very positive results. Studies indicate Terminalia chebula, collagen, curcumin and vitamin D show promise for joint health.

To read this article in its entirety, check out the Joint health across the life span digital magazine..

Mark A. LeDoux is founder, chairman and CEO of Natural Alternatives International Inc.,an organization established in 1980 with facilities in the U.S. and Switzerland engaged in the research, design and manufacture of nutritional supplement programs and products for multinational clients. He is a proud member and leader of many industry organizations.

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Monday Medical: Arthritis and cold weather | SteamboatToday.com – Steamboat Pilot and Today

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2021

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS If you suffer from arthritis, its probably no surprise that cold weather can make it worse. But why does this happen? And what can you do about?

Dr. Nicole Cotter, a rheumatologist with UCHealth Rheumatology Clinic in Steamboat Springs, answers those questions and more below.

Arthritis, by definition, is inflammation of the joints, Cotter said. But there are probably more than a hundred different kinds of arthritis.

One main type is osteoarthritis, in which wear and tear breaks down the cartilage that cushions a joint, resulting in pain.

There are also various types of arthritis that are caused by abnormalities in the immune system. Rheumatoid arthritis, for instance, often strikes when someone is in their 30s or 40s.

Theres a misconception that arthritis is just a natural part of getting old, Cotter said. So many people come into my office and say, Im too young to be here, but unfortunately, theyre the perfect age to be there because of the type of arthritis they have.

If you experience joint stiffness and pain, see your health care provider. Early treatment can result in better long-term outcomes, and various treatments can help reduce pain.

Listen to your body, Cotter said. If you think that somethings not right, somethings probably not right.

Most of the time when people have arthritis, cold weather makes them feel worse, Cotter said. There are a lot of different theories as to why.

Cold weather is often preceded by a drop in barometric pressure, which can cause tissues to expand and pain to increase.

When temperatures drop, the fluid in the joint actually becomes thicker, which could worsen pain.

People also tend to be less active in cold weather, and joint pain is typically worse when people are more sedentary.

Its actually not an old wives tale that people with arthritis know when they weathers going to change, Cotter said. Its not clear why, but certainly, cold weather makes arthritis worse.

Cotter recommends three strategies to help decrease arthritis pain due to cold weather stay active, stay warm and stay healthy.

Staying active helps you increase blood flow and reduce stiffness.

For most people with arthritis when they wake up first thing in the morning or get up after being in a car, they feel stiff, Cotter said. By staying active, you help combat that stiffness.

Its also important to keep your body warm. Simply staying warm helps, Cotter said. When your joints are warmer, theres more blood flow to the joint and muscles are more relaxed.

Keep your home warm, use a heating blanket and wear appropriate clothing, including layers, gloves and warm socks. People with arthritis in their hands may find that paraffin wax treatments bring relief.

And you do your best to stay healthy. By getting enough sleep, eating a healthy diet, maintaining an optimal level of vitamin D and getting a flu shot, you will support your immune system, which in turn can help decrease pain.

Remember to be careful on the snow and ice.

If people have arthritis, their balance might not be optimal as joint pain here and there can affect your gait, Cotter said. The last thing we want is for somebody to fall on the ice, so just be cognizant of that.

The good news is that by staying active, warm and healthy, you can make a difference in your pain level in cold weather.

Lifestyle modifications can help to manage those symptoms in a cold environment, Cotter said.

Susan Cunningham writes for UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center. She can be reached at cunninghamsbc@gmail.com.

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