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Archive for the ‘Eye Sight & Vision’ Category

Feel Safer When Driving With Bad Eyesight – The Intelligent Driver

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

It shouldnt really need to be stated that your eyesight of the utmost importance when youre on the road. Driving primarily relies on your ability to see around you and to react to changes in your environment by picking up on them visually. There are a lot of drivers who have to wear glasses or contacts in order to do it effectively, but you might feel a little less confident about getting the wheel if you dont have 20/20 vision. Here are a few tips that can help you feel a little safer.

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Get your vision tested

First of all, if youre worried that your vision has changed since the last time you have gotten behind the wheel, or that it has shifted gradually over the past months, then its important to get to the truth of the matter. Arrange a vision test with your optometrist and they can give you definitive answers on whether or not any such changes have occurred. Most importantly, they will be able to inform you as to whether or not you can safely drive on the road. If they say you cannot, then take that as a rule of law, as you can get in trouble if you ignore their advice.

Choose the right glasses

A good eye test will be able to help you get your prescription down, but you still need to pick a good pair of glasses. You can find a store and quickly pick up a pair of frames without issue, but you should take the time to make sure that theyre right for driving with. For one, its a good idea to make sure youre not using frames with chunky edges and choose larger lenses so that youre better able to keep your peripheral vision while driving. You might even want to choose a pair of glasses that use transparent elastic bands to hold frames in place, though they can cost a little more and might not be essential.

Always be prepared

You should always ensure that you have a spare pair of glasses in the glove compartment of your car. That way, should your glasses fall off of your forget to bring them with you, you can make sure that you can hop right back into action. You dont want to be fishing around the floor of your car looking for glasses on the side of the road. Similarly, keep a pack of glasses cleaning wipes at hand so that you can keep your vision clear without too much hassle. Otherwise, if you want to make sure that you have a little added protection on the road, then choose a car that has great safety options just to offer you some peace of mind.

Beware the glare

Its a problem that many glasses wearers are already aware of but, if you havent driven in glasses before, you might be surprised just how much of a headache it can be, literally and metaphorically. For people with issues like astigmia, the glare caused by sunlight hitting your glasses (and the windshield) can cause headaches that can distract you while youre driving. Most people are going to have trouble driving with the sun glaring in their eyes, anyway. There are anti-reflecting coats that can help you, however. These coatings can protect your eyes from the sun, as well as other sources of light, such as taillights, street lamps, and more. That way, you can make sure that youre driving free of distraction.

Use your night driving tools

If youre worried about your vision, then perhaps the tip that will put you best at ease is to simply not drive at night. However, in some cases, it might not be that easy so you should at least be prepared. To that end, you should consider getting a pair of night vision glasses specifically made for people who experience night blindness. Otherwise, make sure that youre relying on the tools that are already at your disposal, such as aiming your car forward at the road accurately. Before you go out driving in the evenings, take care to clean your headlights, too, as grime from the road can build up to obscure them and diminish their ability to light the road ahead properly.

If your vision is really that bad, you wont be allowed to drive on the road and that will be that. Otherwise, keep the tips above in mind to ensure youre always taking the best care of yourself.

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Eye Health: Follow These 5 Tips To Take Care of Your Eyesight – India.com

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Over 3 crore individuals suffer from blindness globally, with India being home to nearly one-third the total figure. While 80 percent of vision impairment can be prevented by early detection and timely intervention, lack of access and awareness has been a major deterrent in individuals seeking eye care. Also Read - Kangana Ranaut Looks Resplendent in Rs 1,35,000 Pastel Blue Chanderi Lehenga, Pearls for Cousin's Wedding in Manali

Reduced eyesight is caused by multiple factors, including diseases like diabetes, eye trauma, cataracts, or glaucoma. Also Read - Weight Loss Tip: Brain, Not Willpower, Decides if You Will Lose Weight Or Not

Over 5 crore people in India have moderate to severe vision impairment which has impacted their personal and professional lives, says Ramesh Pillai, Chief Optometrist & Head of Training, Titan Company Ltd, Eyewear Business. The onslaught of COVID-19 has also led to an increase in screen-time for people across ages and this has been a major factor in declining eye health. Eye care and eye health have become more of a necessity, he adds. Also Read - Second Wave Of COVID-19 in India, Experts Say Possibility of it Cannot Be Ruled Out in Winters

He suggests five simple and effective ways to ensure good eye health:

Right Glasses

Wearing branded Sunglasses that offer 100 percent UV protection while outdoors can help protect your eyes from the harmful impact of UV rays and Cataract formation. Wearing the right spectacles for screen usage like anti-reflection lenses with Blue Coating is extremely important. The Blue coating helps in blocking the harmful blue-violet and allows the essential blue turquoise to help the circadian rhythm and thereby maintain the sleep-wake cycle.

Right Diet

Eating leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli contain Lutein and zeaxanthin to help prevent cataracts. Lutein also stimulates the growth of pigments that help block out harmful UV rays. Food rich in Vitamins C and E and zinc, reduce the risk of developing a condition called Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). Antioxidants protect against sun damage. Good sources of antioxidants include egg yolk, yellow peppers, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, carrots, blueberries. Onions, shallots, garlic, capers contain sulphur, cysteine, and lecithin, which help against cataract formation.

Keep Eyes Moist

Dry eyes are a major irritant, especially as the pollution gets worse day by day. Resting the eyes often and blinking moistens the eyes, reducing dryness and irritation. One can also use drops to help keep your eyes moist in case of excess dryness.

Screen Protection

With an increase in screen-time becoming an inevitable reality, taking good care of your eyes is paramount. Use the 20-20-20 rule, by taking a 20-second screen break every 20 minutes to look at objects 20 feet away from you. Increase font size when reading on-screen, so that devices dont need to be too close to your eyes, and you dont have to squint. A clean screen boosts visibility, wipe your screen over at least once a day.

Get tested

Getting your eyes tested by a qualified Optometrist or an Eye Doctor once every year is very important. Regular eye examinations help find any symptoms associated with eye strains and provide solutions for the same. Titan Eyeplus on the occasion of World Sight Day has introduced an initiative online screen testing. Take out 60 seconds and take a simple online eye screening test that will give you an indication of whether you suffer from eyesight problems. Basis screening results, the brand requests all to visit an ophthalmologist or optician.

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Watch your eyes! – Taking care of your sight during the COVID-19 pandemic – Jamaica Gleaner

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of adults and children have increased screen time on computers, tablets and phones. This prolonged screen time can lead to eye discomfort, fatigue, blurred vision, headaches, and dry eyes. Low lighting, glare, improper workstation set-up and undiagnosed visual problems can make things worse. When we look at a screen for a prolonged period without a break, this can lead to eye irritation and dry eyes, due to reduced blinking, with accommodative problems (difficulty focusing near and far). Children tend to ignore these symptoms, which can lead to excessive eye strain.

Ways to reduce these symptoms:

Take a scheduled 10-minute break for every hours work;

Adjust the computer to the childs body, using an adjustable chair height and footstool to help;

Check the lighting on the computer and avoid direct light on to the screen. Use dinner lighting instead of bright overhead lights;

Treat dry eyes and do eye exercises;

An annual eye examination will help diagnose refractive errors that need correction.

The following populations need additional preventative measures:

All patients 12 years and older with diabetes mellitus should have their eyes checked at least once a year. Interventions include putting eye drops in the eyes by a trained person, screeners, optometrists and ophthalmologists. An examination of the back of the eye (the retina) will detect diabetic retinopathy early. We encourage all people with diabetes to take along their clinic passports so we can make a note. You can reduce diabetic retinopathy by controlling your glucose levels and keeping your blood pressure and cholesterol levels at normal levels.

Glaucoma is common in our population. Persons can have normal vision in early and moderate glaucoma because the outer (peripheral) vision is affected first. One may not appreciate this visual loss until it is late, because when we open both eyes, they each help with peripheral vision. The reading vision is usually affected in advanced glaucoma (end-stage). All patients over 40 years should have their eyes screened for glaucoma. Risk factors apart from your heritage include patients with a family history. Short-sighted persons (high myopes) may need screening before age 40.

Patients around the age of 40 years may notice difficulty with seeing the fine print or have blurred vision while looking at their phone screens and may need to push the reading material some distance away to see. This condition is called presbyopia and is a normal phenomenon that usually requires glasses to improve near vision.

Patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS, HbSC) and patients on certain medications such as hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) should also have their eyes checked every year. We encourage patients, young and old with no medical conditions or other risk factors that may affect the eye to have at least a check on their eyes every two years. A healthy diet includes dark green and purple vegetables, and yellow/orange vegetables and fruits are good for your eyes. Remember to keep your eye appointments during this time, unless advised otherwise by your eye doctor.

Routine eye examinations can often detect and reduce the impact of visual impairment due to uncorrected refractive errors (the need for glasses and/or contact lenses), a significant cause of visual impairment. In children, a vision screen can detect treatable conditions, including refractive errors, strabismus (squint), eye cancers (retinoblastoma), congenital cataracts, and glaucoma. Undetected refractive errors can lead to the development of amblyopia, an irreversible visual loss in an otherwise healthy eye. Amblyopia can be treated if detected early. It is, therefore, essential that all preschool children (ages five to six) have an eye examination. Subsequently, children should have an eye examination every two years, if all else is healthy

Dr Amoy Ramsay is a consultant ophthalmologist at the Cornwall Regional Hospital.

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Watch your eyes! - Taking care of your sight during the COVID-19 pandemic - Jamaica Gleaner

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Eyesight of five of eight cataract op patients irreversibly damaged (Updated) – Cyprus Mail

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

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Onesight Provides Vision Care to 200 New Yorkers at NYC Vision Clinic on World Sight Day – InvisionMag

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

(PRESS RELEASE) CINCINNATI, OH From October 8 10, OneSight, the leading global vision care nonprofit, teamed up with partner Fresh Air Fund and sponsors Fidelity Security Life Insurance, LCA Vision, Anthem and Wachter to provide eye exams and glasses to 200 New Yorkers.

The three-day charitable clinic, which kicked off on World Sight Day, Oct. 8th, addressed unresolved vision care needs for New Yorkers who may otherwise lack access. Leveraging OneSights proven clinic model and manufacturing capabilities, most participants in need of glasses received their newly prescribed eyewear on-site.

Caring for vulnerable populations has to be about more than just immediate need, said K-T Overbey, president and executive director at OneSight. Clear sight opens windows to the future it improves long-term educational, professional and social prospects. Our work improves quality of life, especially for individuals in need. Were extremely proud of the work we did on the ground in New York with our vision clinic.

On World Sight Day, OneSight also teamed up with other leading global vision nonprofits Clearly and IAPB to shine a light on the 230 million+ kids worldwide that need glasses, but dont have access to get them. They did this by launching the free digital childrens book Through the Looking Glasses: Stories About Seeing Clearly, which features 30 childrens stories and illustrations about seeing clearly by authors and artists from 17 countries.

The global initiative also included Bedtime Stories where celebrities, athletes and authors, such as Tennis Legend Billie Jean King; Restaurateur David Chang; Celebrity Michelle Yeoh; and TV Star Jo Frost, read stories from the book on World Sight day as tens of thousands participated around the world.

To learn more about OneSight, World Sight Day, and download the free digital book Through the Looking Glasses, visit http://www.onesight.org/worldsightday

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Therapy restores vision in mice with retina disease – Futurity: Research News

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

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New generation CRISPR technology could pave the way for therapeutics to treat inherited retina diseases, researchers report.

In this proof-of-concept study, we provide evidence of the clinical potential of base editors for the correction of mutations causing inherited retinal diseases and for restoring visual function, says Krzysztof Palczewski, chair and a professor in the Gavin Herbert Eye Institutes ophthalmology department at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine. Our results demonstrate the most successful rescue of blindness to date using genome editing.

Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are a group of blinding conditions caused by mutations in more than 250 different genes. Previously, there was no avenue available for treating these devastating blinding diseases. Recently, the FDA approved the first gene augmentation therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a common form of IRD which originates during childhood.

As an alternative to gene augmentation therapy, we applied a new generation of CRISPR technology, referred to as base editing as a treatment for inherited retinal diseases, says first author Susie Suh, assistant specialist in the ophthalmology department.

We overcame some of the barriers to the CRISPR-Cas9 system, such as unpredictable off-target mutations and low editing efficiency, by utilizing cytosine and adenine base editors (CBE and ABE). Use of these editors enabled us to correct point mutations in a precise and predictable manner while minimizing unintended mutations that could potentially cause undesirable side effects, says co-first author Elliot Choi, also an assistant specialist in the ophthalmology department.

Using an LCA mouse model harboring a clinically relevant pathogenic mutation in the Rpe65 gene, the researchers successfully demonstrated the therapeutic potential of base editing for the treatment of LCA and by extension other inherited blinding diseases.

Among other results, the base editing treatment restored retinal and visual function in LCA mice to near-normal levels. Base editing was developed at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard in the lab of David Liu.

After receiving treatment, the mice in our study could discriminate visual changes in terms of direction, size, contrast, and spatial and temporal frequency, says Palczewski.

These results are extremely encouraging and represent a major advance towards the development of treatments for inherited retinal diseases.

Gene therapy approaches to treating inherited retinal diseases are of special interest given the accessibility of the eye, its immune-privileged status, and the successful clinical trials of RPE65 gene augmentation therapy that led to the first US Food and Drug Administration-approved gene therapy.

Now, as demonstrated in this study, base-editing technology can provide an alternative treatment model of gene augmentation therapy to permanently rescue the function of a key vision-related protein disabled by mutations.

The new paper appears in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

Support for the research came from the National Institutes of Health; the Research to Prevent Blindness Stein Innovation Award; Fight for Sight; the Eye and Tissue Bank Foundation (Finland); the Finnish Cultural Foundation; the Orion Research Foundation; the Helen Hay Whitney Foundation; US Department of Veterans Affairs; and a Research to Prevent Blindness unrestricted grant to the Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, Irvine.

Source: UC Irvine

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Eye Health: 5 ways to take care of your eyesight – India TV News

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Image Source : INSTAGRAM/KEONESKINCARE

Eye Health: 5 ways to take care of your eyesight

Reduced eyesight is caused by multiple factors, including diseases like diabetes, eye trauma, cataracts or glaucoma. Over 3 crore individuals suffer from blindness globally, with India being home to nearly one-third the total figure. While 80 percent vision impairment can be prevented by early detection and timely intervention, lack of access and awareness has been a major deterrent in individuals seeking eye care.

Over 5 crore people in India have moderate to severe vision impairment which has impacted their personal and professional lives, says Ramesh Pillai, Chief Optometrist & Head of Training, Titan Company Ltd, Eyewear Business. "The onslaught of COVID-19 has also led to an increase in screen-time for people across ages and this has been a major factor in declining eye health. Eye care and eye health have become more of a necessity," he adds.

He suggests five simple and effective ways to ensure good eye health:

Wearing branded Sunglasses which offer 100 percent UV protection while outdoors can help protect your eyes from the harmful impact of UV rays and Cataract formation. Wearing the right spectacles for screen usage like anti-reflection lenses with Blue Coating is extremely important. The Blue coating helps in blocking the harmful blue violet and allows the essential blue turquoise to help the circadian rhythm and thereby maintain the sleep-wake cycle.

Eating leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli contain Lutein and zeaxanthin help prevent cataracts. Lutein also stimulates the growth of pigments that help block out harmful UV rays. Food rich in Vitamins C and E and zinc, reduce the risk of developing a condition called Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). Antioxidants protect against sun damage. Good sources of antioxidants include egg yolk, yellow peppers, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, carrots, blueberries. Onions, shallots, garlic, capers contain sulphur, cysteine, and lecithin, which help against cataract formation.

Dry eyes are a major irritant, especially as the pollution gets worse day by day. Resting the eyes often and blinking moistens the eyes, reducing dryness and irritation. One can also use drops to help keep your eyes moist in case of excess dryness.

With an increase in screen-time becoming an inevitable reality, taking good care of your eyes is paramount. Use the 20-20-20 rule, by taking a 20 second screen break every 20 minutes to look at objects 20 feet away from you. Increase font size when reading on-screen, so that devices don't need to be too close to your eyes, and you don't have to squint. A clean screen boosts visibility, wipe your screen over at least once a day.

Getting your eyes tested by a qualified Optometrist or an Eye Doctor once every year is very important. Regular eye examinations help find any symptoms associated with eye strains and provide solutions for the same. Titan Eyeplus on the occasion of World Sight Day has introduced an initiative -- online screen testing. Take out 60 seconds and take a simple online eye screening test that will give you an indication whether you suffer from eyesight problems. Basis screening results, the brand requests all to visit an ophthalmologist or optician.

Fight against Coronavirus: Full coverage

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Here’s the worst place in Essex for sight loss – Clacton and Frinton Gazette

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

TENDRING has been revealed to be one of the worst areas for sight loss in the country, according to the latest data from the NHS.

Opticians website Book An Eye Test has compiled a list of the Top 10 places in the UK in which people have the poorest eyesight.

Sight loss is defined as being full or partial loss of sight, and temporary or permanent blindness, in one or both eyes.

North Norfolk tops the lists, with 5.45 per cent of people living with sight loss, but Tendring has also crept into the list with nearly 7,200 people with sight loss.

This makes the district the 9th worst area in the country for sight loss, with 4.84 per cent of its 145,000 residents living with poor vision.

Commenting on the findings, Katie Memory, director and managing partner at Memory Opticians, believes the results are not surprising given the average age of residents.

She said: The research shows that the places with the highest levels of sight loss are mainly situated in rural or coastal areas.

This is not surprising, as these areas are typically home to ageing populations, who often show higher rates of sight loss compared to younger generations, as sight loss increases gradually as we get older.

This also explains why, at the other end of the scale, large cities with younger populations such as London and Manchester contain fewer people suffering from sight loss.

You can view the full list by visiting bookaneyetest.co.uk/post/britains-vision.

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Eyesight Test Equipment Market 2019 | Analyzing The Impact Followed By Restraints, Opportunities And Projected Developments | UpMarketResearch -…

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

UpMarketResearch publishes a detailed report on Eyesight Test Equipment market providing a complete information on the current market situation and offering robust insights about the potential size, volume, and dynamics of the market during the forecast period, 2020-2026. This report offers an in-depth analysis that includes the latest information including the current COVID-19 impact on the market and future assessment of the impact on Global Eyesight Test Equipment Market. The report contains XX pages, which will assist clients to make informed decision about their business investment plans and strategies for the market. As per the report by UpMarketResearch, the global Eyesight Test Equipment market is projected to reach a value of USDXX by the end of 2026 and grow at a CAGR of XX% during the forecast period.

Get FREE Exclusive PDF Sample Copy of This Report: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/home/requested_sample/51303

The Eyesight Test Equipment market report also covers an overview of the segments and sub-segmentations including the product types, applications, and regions. In the light of this harsh economic condition as prompted by the COVID-19 outbreak, the report studies the dynamics of the market, changing competition landscape, and the flow of the global supply and consumption.

The report exclusively deals with key areas such as market size, scope, and growth opportunities of the Eyesight Test Equipment market by analyzing the market trend and data available for the period from 2020-2026. Keeping 2019 as the base year for the research study, the report explains the key drivers as well as restraining factors, which are likely to have major impact on the development and expansion of the market during the forecast period.

The report, published by UpMarketResearch, is the most reliable information as the study relies on a concrete research methodology focusing on both primary as well as secondary sources. The report is prepared by relying on primary source including interviews of the company executives & representatives and accessing official documents, websites, and press release of the private and public companies.

The report, prepared by UpMarketResearch, is widely known for its accuracy and factual figures as it consists of a concise graphical representations, tables, and figures which displays a clear picture of the developments of the products and its market performance over the last few years. It uses statistical surveying for SWOT analysis, PESTLE analysis, predictive analysis, and real-time analytics.

Customize Report and Inquiry for the Eyesight Test Equipment market Report: https://www.upmarketresearch.com/home/enquiry_before_buying/51303

Furthermore, the scope of the growth potential, revenue growth, product range, and pricing factors related to the Eyesight Test Equipment market are thoroughly assessed in the report in a view to entail a broader picture of the market. The report also covers the recent agreements including merger & acquisition, partnership or joint venture and latest developments of the manufacturers to sustain in the global competition of the Eyesight Test Equipment market.

Competition Landscape:

The report covers global aspect of the market, covering

Global Eyesight Test Equipment market by Types:

PortableStationary

Global Eyesight Test Equipment market by Applications:

ChildrenAdults

Key Players for Global Eyesight Test Equipment market:

EyeNetraBhavana MDCEssilor InternationalAlcon Inc.HeineHeidelberg Engineering GmbHSeiko Optical Products Co. Ltd.Nidek Co. Ltd.Carl Zeiss AGHoya CorporationAbbott Medical Optics.Inc.Johnson & Johnson Vision Care.Inc.Shenzhen Certainn Technology

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UpMarketResearch offers attractive discounts on customization of reports as per your need. This report can be personalized to meet your requirements. Get in touch with our sales team, who will guarantee you to get a report that suits your necessities.

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UpMarketResearch (https://www.upmarketresearch.com) is a leading distributor of market research report with more than 800+ global clients. As a market research company, we take pride in equipping our clients with insights and data that holds the power to truly make a difference to their business. Our mission is singular and well-defined we want to help our clients envisage their business environment so that they are able to make informed, strategic and therefore successful decisions for themselves.

Contact Info UpMarketResearchName Alex MathewsPhone No.: +1 909 545 6473Email [emailprotected]Website https://www.upmarketresearch.comAddress 500 East E Street, Ontario, CA 91764, United States.

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Prevent Blindness Encourages Everyone to Take a Screen Time-Out – PR Web

Thursday, October 22nd, 2020

Prevent Blindness launches new awareness campaign, "Screen Time-Out," to help reduce the risk of digital eye strain.

CHICAGO (PRWEB) October 21, 2020

In response to increased virtual activity during the coronavirus pandemic, Prevent Blindness, the nation's leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight, today launched Screen Time-Out, an awareness campaign to encourage Americans, especially parents of young children, to introduce regular screen breaks into their daily routines.

During work, school and even personal downtime, people spend as much as 12 hours a day in front of a digital screen. This amount of screen time exacerbates the risk of digital eye strain, also known as computer vision syndrome, especially for children whose eyes are still developing. Symptoms may include tired, burning or itching eyes, dry eyes, blurred vision and/or headache. The risk of digital eye strain has recently risen to a mounting level in the United States during the coronavirus pandemic, with 53 percent of respondents in a recent survey feeling burnout on screens over the last few months.

"At Prevent Blindness, we are concerned about people spending more and more time in front of our screens," said Jeff Todd, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness. "As an organization dedicated to ensuring everyone has a lifetime of healthy vision, the Screen Time-Out campaign is meant to educate people and reduce the risk of eye strain, starting with the youngest among us.

The Screen Time-Out campaign will live on social media Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest where device users are already spending a lot of their recreational screen time.

According to a recent survey of American eyecare professionals, 64 percent of respondents have seen an increase in patients having issues due to more screen time. Sixty-eight percent said they have seen those issues in both children and adults.

"Digital eye strain has been a rising modern threat to people of all ages, and it is linked to myriad issues, including eye development and nearsightedness," said Dr. Linda Chous, pediatric optometrist. "It is important now more than ever to be mindful of how much time we spend with screens and take steps to reduce the impact of digital eye strain."

To reduce eye strain, Prevent Blindness recommends children and adults take regular breaks using the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, shift eyes away from the screen to look at an object at least 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.

Other tips to avoid eye strain from the American Academy of Ophthalmology include:

For more information about Screen Time-Out and Prevent Blindness, visit http://www.preventblindness.org/screen-time-out.

About Prevent BlindnessFounded in 1908, Prevent Blindness is the nation's leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Focused on promoting a continuum of vision care, Prevent Blindness touches the lives of millions of people each year through public and professional education, advocacy, certified vision screening and training, community and patient service programs and research. These services are made possible through the generous support of the American public. Together with a network of affiliates, Prevent Blindness is committed to eliminating preventable blindness in America. For more information, or to make a contribution to the sight-saving fund, call 1-800-331-2020. Or, visit us on the Web at http://www.preventblindness.org or http://www.facebook.com/preventblindness.

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Vitamin-Rich Foods that May Protect Your Eyesight – STL.News

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

(STL.News) With World Sight Day, there has been an effort to increase awareness of how important it is to look after our vision. We all know that we should take regular breaks when it comes toworking on laptops and stop being on social media all the time. It is essential that our eyes get a rest.

Of course, more people are working from home now than ever before. This means it is difficult to get away from technology. So, you have to think of other ways you can adjust your lifestyle so that you can boost your eye health. In particular, eating a well-balanced diet can really help your eyes. There are vitamin-rich foods that you should incorporate into your meals every day.

Everybody knows that vitamins and minerals are good for our bodies. In particular, vitamin C is beneficial for your eyesight. It is an antioxidant that can lower the risk of macular degeneration developing, as well as cataracts. So, you are going to want to incorporate coriander into your diet. It is a herb that is full of vitamin C, as well as vitamin A, which is great for protecting the cornea.

There has been a lot of progress when it comes to treating eye conditions. For example, you can find out about what the Tej Kohli Foundation is doing to help cure blindness around theworld. But in the meantime, there are some foods you can add to your diet to help protect your vision and avoid becoming a patient of the foundation. For example, fish contains a lot of omega-three fatty acids that may help alleviate dry eye symptoms.

A portion of easy food that you can eat more of is eggs. They are packed full of vitamin A, zinc and lutein, which are all amazing for your vision. Together, they can help look after your eyes and lower the risk of problems developing later in life. For example, zinc is beneficial for helping your eyes to see better in the dark. Since you can enjoy eggs in a variety of ways, there is always going to be a way you can eat them. This could be for your breakfast, in a sandwich for lunch or as part of your evening meal.

There was probably one food that you already knew was beneficial for eye health. Of course, this would be carrots. The rumors you have heard are true and they contain vitamin A and beta carotene. Together, there are nutrients that reduce the risk of eye conditions, as well as fight off infections. Again, carrots are versatile and you can sneak them into your meals if you do not like the taste. But they do make a refreshing snack on a hot day.

Nuts and seeds are known as nutrient-rich foods. Indeed, almonds are said to be very good for maintaining good eyesight. This is due to almonds containing vitamin E. This is a nutrient that can help to safeguard your eyes from macular degeneration, and cataracts, which can lead to blindness. Almonds are an easy snack that you can enjoy when you are at home or work, as well as mixing them into your breakfast and lunch meals.

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5 ways to take care of eye health – India New England

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

By Puja Gupta

New Delhi Reduced eyesight is caused by multiple factors, including diseases like diabetes, eye trauma, cataracts or glaucoma.

Over 3 crore individuals suffer from blindness globally, with India being home to nearly one-third the total figure. While 80 percent vision impairment can be prevented by early detection and timely intervention, lack of access and awareness has been a major deterrent in individuals seeking eye care.

Over 5 crore people in India have moderate to severe vision impairment which has impacted their personal and professional lives, says Ramesh Pillai, Chief Optometrist & Head of Training, Titan Company Ltd, Eyewear Business. The onslaught of COVID-19 has also led to an increase in screen-time for people across ages and this has been a major factor in declining eye health. Eye care and eye health have become more of a necessity, he adds.

He suggests five simple and effective ways to ensure good eye health:

Right Glasses

Wearing branded Sunglasses which offer 100 percent UV protection while outdoors can help protect your eyes from the harmful impact of UV rays and Cataract formation. Wearing the right spectacles for screen usage like anti-reflection lenses with Blue Coating is extremely important. The Blue coating helps in blocking the harmful blue violet and allows the essential blue turquoise to help the circadian rhythm and thereby maintain the sleep-wake cycle.

Right Diet

Eating leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale and broccoli contain Lutein and zeaxanthin help prevent cataracts. Lutein also stimulates the growth of pigments that help block out harmful UV rays. Food rich in Vitamins C and E and zinc, reduce the risk of developing a condition called Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). Antioxidants protect against sun damage. Good sources of antioxidants include egg yolk, yellow peppers, pumpkins, sweet potatoes, carrots, blueberries. Onions, shallots, garlic, capers contain sulphur, cysteine, and lecithin, which help against cataract formation.

Keep Eyes Moist

Dry eyes are a major irritant, especially as the pollution gets worse day by day. Resting the eyes often and blinking moistens the eyes, reducing dryness and irritation. One can also use drops to help keep your eyes moist in case of excess dryness.

Screen Protection

With an increase in screen-time becoming an inevitable reality, taking good care of your eyes is paramount. Use the 20-20-20 rule, by taking a 20 second screen break every 20 minutes to look at objects 20 feet away from you. Increase font size when reading on-screen, so that devices dont need to be too close to your eyes, and you dont have to squint. A clean screen boosts visibility, wipe your screen over at least once a day.

Get tested

Getting your eyes tested by a qualified Optometrist or an Eye Doctor once every year is very important. Regular eye examinations help find any symptoms associated with eye strains and provide solutions for the same. Titan Eyeplus on the occasion of World Sight Day has introduced an initiative online screen testing. Take out 60 seconds and take a simple online eye screening test that will give you an indication whether you suffer from eyesight problems. Basis screening results, the brand requests all to visit an ophthalmologist or optician.(IANS)

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Survey finds UK adults underestimate the need for regular eye examinations – AOP

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

The survey, held by Johnson & Johnson Vision, found a disconnect between how the public views the importance of eye health and how regularly they attend an eye examination

Research conducted by Johnson & Johnson Vision has found that, while most UK adults acknowledge that eye examinations are important for their overall health, only a third are having their eyes examined once a year.

The most common reason for putting off appointments was because respondents felt their vision hadnt changed, while the impact of COVID-19 played a significant role in delays to appointments, Johnson & Johnson Vision found.

The company held the survey of 1002 UK adults ahead of World Sight Day on 8 October as part of Johnson & Johnson Visions Prioritise Your Eyes campaign, which aims to raise awareness of eye health.

Those surveyed appeared to recognise the importance of eye health and its impact on overall wellbeing, with results indicating that 86% of respondents view an eye exam as important for their overall health. Meanwhile 70% acknowledged that healthy vision improves quality of life, and 67% recognised that an eye exam can help prevent vision problems.

However, only 34% of those surveyed confirmed that they get an eye exam each year, something Johnson & Johnson Vision recommends to help patients to Prioritize your eyes. Just over half of respondents felt they did enough to protect their eyes.

Johnson & Johnson Vision suggested the survey results revealed a disconnect in the publics views around the importance of eye health and how they prioritise their own eye care.

Commenting on the survey, Jakob Sveen, managing director for Northern Europe and general manager for the UK & Ireland, Johnson & Johnson Vision, emphasised the companys commitment to fulfilling unmet needs in eye health, especially around awareness and access the two biggest barriers to care.

This survey has uncovered new insights and opportunities around how we, as an eye health community, can help people to prioritise their eyes by getting an annual eye exam, Mr Sveen added.

Providing reasons for why they do not get an eye exam once a year, a third of respondents explained that they put off appointments because they feel their vision hasnt changed.

The second biggest factor behind why eye care has been delayed this year was the impact of COVID-19. The survey found that 18% of adults had their appointment cancelled due to the pandemic, while 19% of respondents said they were reluctant or unable to schedule a sight test due to the pandemic. Meanwhile, 18% of survey respondents suggested cost represented a barrier for them.

Reflecting on the challenges that COVID-19 has posed in balancing the backlog of appointments, Dr Ioannis G. Tranoudis, senior director EMEA professional education solutions at Johnson & Johnson Vision, noted the agility that eye care professionals (ECPs) have shown in communicating with, and supporting, patients.

What weve seen is that emergency cases are prioritised first, so there may be a delay in being able to get everyone in quickly, Dr Tranoudis told OT. He emphasised that any patient experiencing a change in vision or with concerns should reach out to their optometrist, adding: As with all healthcare professionals in this time, ECPs have put in place new safety protocols so that patients can still receive quality care.

Moving forward, the companys focus will be in working with eye care professionals to get patients back into practice safely, he continued.

Asked what initial steps practices could take to enhance patient awareness around regular eye examinations, Dr Tranoudis highlighted: Through lockdown, I saw a lot of eye care professionals increase their communications with patients through digital channels including email updates, newsletters, through their websites, and social media.

I would encourage that, when a practice is ready and has capacity, they communicate to patients the importance of an annual eye exam, Dr Tranoudis said. Even if a patient thinks they have good vision, an annual eye exam can be one of the best things they can do for health and wellness.

Dr Tranoudis also suggested optometrists continue to reassure patients that it is safe to book an appointment if they have concerns about their eyes.

We have heard a few stories of patients being afraid to reach out during lockdown despite having a serious vision issue. ECPs can help provide reassurance by reaching out to patients proactively, suggesting that they get in touch if they have any concerns, Dr Tranoudis concluded.

The AOP recommends patients should have an eye test every two years, or more if recommended by an optometrist, and hosts a variety of resources for patientsincluding advice on regular sight tests.

Share your story

As the coronavirus pandemic transforms optometry across the UK, wed like you hear your experiences. If you, or a colleague, is interested in sharing your story, please get in touch: [emailprotected]

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Vision 2020 – The New Indian Express

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

Express News Service

BENGALURU: Good vision is a key factor for our overall health, safety, and quality of life. Though the eyes are one of the most important organs of sense in our body, people often neglect to get their eye tested regularly, unless they have some problem with their vision. Vision problems such as cataract, refractive errors, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinopathy can impact people of all age groups.

Infants, school-going children, women, the elderly, people with disabilities or a family history of visual impairment, and those with chronic lifestyle disorders such as diabetes are especially vulnerable. According to data from IAPB (The International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness), early detection of vision problems can prevent more than 75 per cent of visual impairment.

Vision impairment or vision loss can affect all aspects of ones life and well-being such as performing activities at home and school, work opportunities, and interacting with family and the community. A comprehensive eye examination can help with early detection of potential eyesight problems, which could lead to vision loss and blindness if left untreated. Data from Avoidable Blindness India, a study group, indicates that about 88.2 per cent of blindness in India is avoidable.

Routine eye examinations are very essential for children at six months of age, three years of age, and five years of age to detect any potential vision abnormalities, which can be corrected in the early stage, while the childs vision system is still developing. For people over the age of 40, dilated eye exams every couple of years can help detect diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and AMD in their early stages. An annual, dilated eye exam is essential for senior citizens who are at increased risk of developing degenerative age-related eye problems that cause slow but permanent damage without any noticeable symptoms.

Eye health during the pandemicEye health has taken a backseat during the coronavirus pandemic, and this could lead to permanent vision loss for those with chronic conditions such as diabetes or glaucoma. Regular follow-up visits are very important, even during this time of Covid-19, in order to monitor vision changes and ensure that any complications can be treated in the early stages to prevent vision loss. It is safe to get an eye exam or surgery done at this time as hospitals are following necessary Covid-19 safety measures such as thermal screening, social distancing of 6 feet, prior appointment system, only 1 attender per patient, use of masks and sanitizers, regular disinfection of waiting areas, testing equipment, and the OT.

Yearly check-ups by an ophthalmologist is a small investment to ensure the long term health of your eyes, and those of your family members. Timely screening can help diagnose a vision problem early and you can get treatment at the right time to avoid vision loss at a later stage. So do not neglect your annual eye check-up which can help you reduce the chance of developing serious eye problems, and keep your eyes and vision healthy in the years to come.The author is the chairman of Narayana Nethralaya

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Halloween Contact Lenses: Beware! – University of Utah Health Care

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

Oct 14, 2020 11:30 AM

Author: Moran Eye Center

An uninformed Halloween costume decision could haunt you for life. Were talking about disguising your eyes with freaky colored contact lenses without a prescription.

Before you go down that road, heres what you should know.

Did you know? Contact lenses of any type are medical devices that sit directly on the cornea (the clear dome of tissue over the iristhe part of the eye that gives you your eye color). Because of the risk of bacterial infections and other potential problems from poorly fitting or contaminated lenses, you should never buy any contact lenses without a valid prescription from a licensed eye care practitioner.

Its illegal to buy contact lenses without a prescription. Even if you dont need any vision correction, you still need a prescription for decorative lenses that will be a good fit.

Vendors who sell cosmetic or special-effect lenses as a type of accessory or jewelry without asking for a prescription are breaking the law and endangering your eyesight.

Cosmetic lenses need to fit correctly on your cornea; otherwise, they can be dangerous.

Any time you place something in your eye, you are risking infection, or injury, so as a general rule, I discourage the use of cosmetic lenses altogether. Even if a patient really wants them and is willing to get a proper fitting and accurate prescription, I am only OK with them being worn temporarily,saysDavid Meyer, OD, director of Contact Lens Services at the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah.

CheckFood and Drug Administration (FDA) websitewhere you can learn more and report the illegal selling of these lenses. They also warn against anime or circle lenses, saying, dont buy them and dont expect your doctor to prescribe them.

The FDA has not cleared these bigger-than-normal lenses that give the wearer a wide-eyed, doll-like look.

Poor contact lens fit can cause severe eye damage, including:

According to the FDA, you shouldneverbuy lenses from:

If your eyes start burning or itching while wearing your lenses, take them out immediately, says Meyer. See your eye doctor if you notice any pain, blurry vision, or discharge. Causing damage to your eyes for the sake of a costume is much scarier than any Halloween fright.

The John A. Moran Eye Center is a world-class institution offering some of the best patient care in the country. It is a nationally ranked care center in the Mountain West centered in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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What if all humans on Earth had albinism? – Live Science

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

The series "Imaginary Earths" speculates what the world might be like if one key aspect of life changed, be it related to the planet or with humanity itself. What might Earth be like if it had rings, or if everyone could photosynthesize like plants?

Albinism, from the Latin "albus," meaning "white," is a group of hereditary conditions with striking results a dearth and often complete absence of pigment in the eyes, skin and hair.

In the United States, about 1 in every 18,000 to 20,000 people have albinism, according to the National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation (NOAH). Meanwhile, in parts of Africa such as areas within Zimbabwe, as many as 1 in 1,000 have albinism, according to the United Nations.

What might the world be like if everyone on Earth had albinism, from prehistoric times until now?

The most common form of albinism in the United States is oculocutaneous albinism, which interferes with the production of the dark pigment melanin in both the eyes and skin, according to NOAH. To date, there are seven known subtypes of this kind of albinism, which doctors have named OCA1 to OCA7, NOAH noted. Depending on the subtype, people may have white, blond or brown hair.

"I have OCA1, the most severe type of oculocutaneous albinism I have no pigment in my hair, skin and eyes," Kelsey Thompson, a rehabilitation counselor in the Chicago area, told Live Science. She previously served for 10 years on the board of directors of NOAH, including as its chair.

Related: The 7 biggest mysteries of the human body

A common myth is that people with albinism have red eyes. Although lighting conditions can make the blood vessels at the back of the eye visible, which can result in the eyes looking red or violet, most people with albinism have blue eyes, and some have hazel or brown eyes, NOAH noted. Thompson's eyes are light blue.

One key concern for people with albinism is the delicacy of fair skin. Melanin, a pigment found in hair and skin, protects skin against ultraviolet light, and people with albinism have to be wary of sunburns and skin cancer.

"When I was younger, I was a little cocky about sun exposure, and got severe sunburns," Thompson said. "Throughout my life, I've gotten in the habit of being more cautious and mindful about the sun, using sunscreen and seeking out shade as often as I can."

Related: 5 facts about skin cancer

It would be interesting to think about how perception of race might change if everyone had albinism.

So if everyone had albinism, what would happen? One scientist interviewed for this story thought this factor alone made it extremely unlikely that populations with albinism would survive over time.

"That's disappointing, but not surprising," Thompson said. "I think a lot of people who don't have the experience of living with albinism see it as they would any disability what a horrible fate to have, how it would be so awful to not do even daily tasks without struggle. But it's not a death sentence."

If everyone had albinism, people around the world might adopt long garments to protect their skin, like desert peoples in the Sahara, and hats, scarves or veils to protect their heads and faces. They might also rely on protective coatings on their skin to serve as sunscreens. The women of the Himba people in Namibia regularly wear an orange or red paste known as otjize that is made of butterfat and ochre, and often perfumed with the aromatic resin of the omuzumba shrub. Although Himba women use otjize for aesthetic reasons, I can imagine a population with albinism could conceivably create a similar paste to serve as sunscreen.

In addition, "I can imagine cultures probably evolving to do more daily activities outside the peak hours of sunlight more in the early morning and late afternoon," Thompson said.

Those with albinism might prefer to make their homes in shady environments and less sunny latitudes think Norway, not Arizona. "I still enjoy going out to the beach with my family," Thompson said. But "I do think there are parts of the world that would just be inhospitably sunny for people to even consider living there if everyone had albinism, like certain parts of the Middle East and American Southwest. Still, I do know people with albinism living in Southern California and loving it."

People with albinism have vision problems because structures within the eye rely on melanin as they develop in the womb. "My best visual acuity is 20/200, making me legally blind," Thompson said. "I have full color vision, but the details I can see are poor. It's not that things look blurry, but it's like the difference between a high-definition TV and a TV from the '80s. People with albinism can also have photophobia, or be more sensitive to glare from light."

Related: What if humans had visual acuity?

These vision problems might lead one to expect that preindustrial societies in a hypothetical past where everyone had albinism would have extraordinary difficulty surviving. "However, there's a lot of variation in vision in albinism, in what you can do," Thompson said. "I have to use certain accommodations for my vision every day, but I can function pretty independently. With albinism, an advantage we have is that we haven't lost anything with vision this is all we've ever known. To me, this is normal."

For instance, "I know people with albinism who are skilled hunters," Thompson said. "I've been involved with albinism organizations my whole life, and every time I think there's a task or job that there's no way a person with albinism can do it, sure enough, there's someone doing it."

So, if the entire human population had albinism, we might use canes, seeing-eye animals and perhaps even echolocation to help navigate the world. Still, there are people with albinism with enough functional vision to drive, Thompson noted.

"My younger brother has the same type of albinism as me, and when we sit in the optometrist's office, his vision tests pretty similarly," Thompson said. "But he adapted to it. He was even a hockey goalie. He didn't watch for the puck, but looked at the players to tell when the puck was coming toward him."

People with albinism with low vision may rely on magnifying glasses and handheld telescopes to help read, "or just hold newsprint closer to the face," Thompson said. "But a lot of the times, we use these aids to accommodate to the sighted world. If a world evolved only with people with albinism, I'd imagine all print would be large print."

Thompson does think preindustrial societies with albinism would likely rely more on agriculture than on hunting. Other possibilities include trapping and fishing with a pole or net, activities that don't require keen eyesight.

People with albinism often face stigmatization worldwide because of how they look. They are often villains in stories for instance, the evil monk Silas in "The Da Vinci Code," (Doubleday, 2003). Dozens of people with albinism have even been murdered for their body parts in Tanzania, according to The New York Times and other sources.

"Some people with albinism grow up in a very supportive environment and didn't face a lot of negativity, whereas others are pretty traumatized," Thompson said. "My experience was middle of the road not too terrible, but I did experience a lot of bullying as a kid. As an adult, it's more of a little annoyance. I get rude and invasive questions, and people wanting to touch my hair. It's really inappropriate behavior, and people normally wouldn't dream of crossing those boundaries with a total stranger, but when you have a visible difference like albinism, it comes with the territory."

Of course, in a world where everyone has albinism, there would almost certainly be no stigma attached to it. Instead, albinism might be viewed as a feature that sets humanity apart and above the rest of nature, along with language and tool use.

Related: The top 10 stigmatized health disorders

"It would be interesting to think about how perception of race might change if everyone had albinism," Thompson said. "A friend of mine from India has the same type of albinism I do, and she and I look more alike than my brother and I, even though we come from two very different ethnic backgrounds.". All in all, she suggests that if everyone had albinism, that might really change what judgments we make about each other in terms of appearance.

Albinism might influence societies other ways. "When I'm talking with a group of people who all have albinism, we do things a little differently than when functioning in the regular world," Thompson said. "When we see someone you know, I introduce myself almost like I'm on the telephone 'Hey, Matt, it's Kelsey' because we know the other person doesn't see so well. And maybe we stand a little bit closer to each other because of our poor eyesight."

Such greetings and adjustments to people's personal bubble of space might become standard features of society in a world where everyone had albinism, Thompson said.

In addition, "there's a lot of nonverbal communication that people with low vision have to be taught, like making eye contact," Thompson said. "I have nystagmus, so my eyes shake a little bit, and I have trouble seeing a person's eyes, so I was taught how to make eye contact, and think about things like not staring non-stop. Those are the kinds of things I've learned to assimilate to the sighted world."

So, if albinism was the default, the norm of making eye contact might not be a norm anymore.

"This is a really unusual mental experiment," Thompson said. "It's challenging thinking about albinism as a norm, and how that would change how that would think about the world and about myself."

Follow Charles Q. Choi on Twitter @cqchoi. Follow us on Twitter @LiveScience and on Facebook.

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Blindness and Sight Loss Is Projected to Double by 2050 – Bel Marra Health

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

According to a new study from the journal Lancet, blindness, sight loss, and severe vision impairment are predicted to double by 2050. Vision problems are estimated to affect almost 900 million people worldwide in the next few decades, which is up from approximately 338 million today.

To come to this conclusion, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) examined more than 500 studies showing trends in the prevalence of vision loss and blindness. After reviewing this data, Professor of Ophthalmology, Rupert Bourne, was able to make forecasts about vision loss over the next three decades.

This study found that currently, 43.3 million people are blind, 295.1 million people have major vision impairment, and 257.8 million are mildly visually impaired. While previous studies have shown that the prevalence of blindness among the over 50s has reduced by 28.5% globally over the past 30 years, population growth means these numbers will increase. An estimate by researchers states that with this population growth, the number of blind people may increase by 50.6%, and the number of people with major visual impairment is believed to almost double.

By using these models, the authors of this study predict a considerable rise in the number of people with severe visual impairment or sight loss in the next 30 years. They do, however, state that these numbers can be prevented if major steps are taken to address the problem.

Professor Bourne, co-ordinator of the Vision Loss Expert Group, spoke about the findings, It is encouraging that age-adjusted prevalence of blindness has reduced over the past three decades, yet due to population growth, progress is not keeping pace with needs. We face enormous challenges in avoiding vision impairment as the global population grows and ages. One of the issues we faced when compiling this data is that for many countries, including the UK, there is a lack of accurate information due to the fact the population has not been officially surveyed for eye disease and its consequences. High quality, current data on eye health and also hearing loss, is needed so the UK can plan future services in the most effective way, improve outcomes for those affected, and develop a more effective public health strategy in these crucial areas. Without this, the provision of services is a postcode lottery as we dont understand the unmet need.

With the rising numbers of vision impairment and blindness possible in the near future, it is imperative that people start taking the health of their eyes seriously. There are many reasons why vision could be affected as we age, including environmental factors, food choices, and even prolonged blue light exposure. By learning how to protect the eyes from future damage, it may make all the difference in keeping your eyesight healthy for a lifetime.

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On World Sight Day, around 1500 Government school children, identified with vision issues were given spectacles at no cost to them – India Education…

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

New Delhi:On World Sight Day, which is celebrated every year on the second Thursday of October month, a spectacles distribution programme for Government School children in Chittapur Taluk of Kalburagi district was organized by Samadhristi, Jaya Foundation, SightRyt and Essilor Vision Foundation.

Mr. Priyank Kharge, MLA, of Chittapur, inaugurated the program and opined that if we can provide required infrastructure to the Schools, only then will the future of the students be bright and this can automatically lead to a growth of the nation.

Mr. Kharge said that when K Ullas Kamath from Jaya Foundation showed interest to find a remedy for these students whose eyesight can be corrected simply by providing spectacles, he utilised the opportunity and got 26,000 students in his taluk tested; out of which 1426 children were suffering from eye sight problems and they have been distributed necessary prescribed spectacles.

He felt, it is not enough to rectify the problem of children eyesight problems, but also to change the thought process of parents. Children should be educated properly, and scientific approach should be developed among them, which will help for the future of this country. He requested parents not to demoralize the children with eyesight problems, instead find a permanent solution.

Mr. K Ullas Kamath of Jaya Foundation said that upto 30% of students suffer from eyesight problems and their parents never come across this information. He further said that the Foundation provides spectacles to those children at no cost to them.

The Director of Sightryt, Mr. Sidharth Pai and Mr. Shiva Kumar Janardhan, CEO of Sightryt Organisation expressed their thoughts to the same effect.

Milind Jadhav, Trustee, Essilor Vision Foundation, India, said, During this difficult times of pandemic, Good vision is key to helping children succeed in academics. A simple eye examination can identify eye-related issues, if found early enough, many of which can be treated with a pair of simple spectacles.

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Vision rehabilitation care for low vision patients in the COVID-19 era – Optometry Times

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

For individuals suffering from vision loss, low vision rehabilitation is the standard of care. Because of the spread of SARS-CoV-2, doctors of optometry must develop new techniques to provide low-vision rehabilitative services with safer protocols.

This is an unprecedented time in optometric and vision rehabilitation care for all providers and patients. I have been an optometrist practicing low vision rehabilitation for more than 15 years at The Chicago Lighthouse, where our comprehensive vision rehabilitation clinic serves more than 3500 patients each year.

While reviewing the guidance from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and our optometric associations, I noticed that these recommendations do not accommodate people with visual disability. It is imperative that optometrists offering vision rehabilitation services consider additional accommodations for this large patient population during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and recovery. I share some recommendations here.

More from October 2020's issue: Protect patients eyes by encouraging a three-step ocular wellness regimen

Mental health effects

Age-related eye diseases are the leading cause of blindness and low vision in the United States.1 As such, most patients referred for vision rehabilitation fall into the population over age 65 years that the CDC currently advises to continue to stay home and avoid close contact with others whenever possible.2

ODs can continue to offer telehealth visits where possible but realize that some patients will need to be seen for both their vision health and mental health.

Depression is strongly associated with functional vision loss.3 Social isolation is linked with poor mental health, and results of a recent poll show that 47 percent of people sheltering in place reported negative mental health effects from worry or stress related to the novel coronavirus.4

Strategies people may use to cope and relax such as TV watching, reading, and exercise can be challenging or even impossible for persons with vision impairment who do not yet have optical or assistive technology. The combination of being sight isolated and socially isolated may compound negative mental health effects.

Vision rehabilitation may have an antidepressant effect.5 Ensure that patients whose care has been delayed during the pandemic are not experiencing additional emotional and psychological consequences. Ask your patient if she feels anxious or depressed. If this is the case, you may want to, in advance of your examination, make a referral to a mental health professional currently offering telehealth services.

Related: Smart contact lens update

Telehealth

If it is unsafe to bring a patient with low vision into the office, consider a telehealth visit, which is covered by Medicare and by many third-party insurers during this COVID-19 pandemic.6 A prescription for a magnification device to be mailed to the patient can be based off the last known best corrected visual acuity. Training in use of the device may be done virtually if the patient has access to computer technology or on the telephone. This telehealth strategy may restore some interim reading ability while a patient stays at home until it is safe to visit the office.

Accommodations during office visits

As many low vision providers return to seeing patients in the office, ODs should think about the specific needs of these patients and how to safely meet them.

Following are suggestions in addition to general COVID-19 guidance from the American Optometric Association.7

Related: In vivo bulbar conjunctival structures study results in

Prepare patients for in-office changes

and screen for mental health effects

Contact patients before their examination and educate them on what changes to expect because of COVID-19 restrictions. Preparing them will help prevent surprise and unneeded anxiety during the appointment.

Patient registration and payment

Reserve first-of-the-day appointments for elderly and other patients at high risk of COVID-19.

If practices recently began using an online portal for patients to preregister and/or pay bills and copays, ensure that patients can use this technology and consider barriers to successful use. Determine whether this portal is compatible with common screen magnification and screen readers. Can the patient see his insurance cards and credit cards?

Ask if patients are familiar with accessibility software or know where to obtain it. Many patients are referred to ODs for vision rehabilitation to learn about these resources and do not have them before the examination.

For patients who cannot access online portals themselves, consider completing the registration and history over the phone.

Make concessions for accepting payments in person for patients who prefer to do so or who cannot access online payment.

Related: Improve medication adherence with technology

Patient entrance

Current public health recommendations suggest allowing only the patient into the officeno family members except for guardians of minors. In vision rehabilitation, however, ODs most often encourage a person or coach to accompany the patient because for many elderly patients with age-related cognitive changes, a second set of ears or a note taker to capture information given is helpful.

Many patients are newly referred and do not yet have mobility skills that make them comfortable to ambulate without a sighted guide. Furthermore, some eyecare practices are calling patients in from their cars to avoid waiting room congregation where possible. Many patients do not drive, so waiting in a car may not be possible, and weather conditions may prevent them from waiting outside.

Allow patients who cannot wait in a car into the waiting room, with chairs spaced an appropriate distance apart.7

Consider allowing one appropriately screened family member to accompany the patient to the appointment.7

For those who do not have someone to accompany them, determine whether a staff member will act as a sighted guide. This can be done in 1 of 3 ways. The guide can speak directions while maintaining social distancing. For cane users, the guide and the patient can hold opposite ends of a white cane between them. For persons needing further support, the guide and the patient should both wear a mask and gloves so the patient can hold onto the guide.

Related: Distinguish between wellness and medical eye exams

The examination

White coats that need laundering are now discouraged, as is dry-clean-only business attire. The white coat with its high contrast might have signaled to poorly-sighted patients that the doctor was in the room. Wearing a mask, gloves, and scrubs and/or street clothes, with no handshake7 but just an introduction from 6 ft (2 m) away leaves the patient with vision impairment at a disadvantage.

Low vision providers usually get physically close to our patients so they can take advantage of relative distance magnification and perhaps see some of our features. Physical closeness, however, is discouraged in this climate. Wearable video magnification devices, including electronic glasses, for visually impaired individuals require training to use successfully, may be difficult to disinfect, and may be cost prohibitive to have in each examination lane. Other options may be better.

As ODs take the patients histories at a distance, tell them it is for their safety.

Consider giving patients a photocard of the doctor that they may view from a closer distance.

Perhaps use a closed-circuit TV camera pointed at the OD across the room with a screen beside the patient so the patient can see the doctors features and gestures magnified.

ODs should consider wearing a facial shield in addition to a mask to allow them to be closer to the patient when needed, especially during trial frame refraction and device evaluation.

Wear gloves and have patients wear gloves when evaluating low vision devices. Disinfect all instruments after each use.7

Work to convey a calm and pleasantness with the voice, offering the reassurance vision-imapired patients so desperately need.

Provide written educational resources for patient reference at the end of the visit.

Grateful, anxiety-relieving hugs from patients are not uncommon. Unfortunately, physical contact is no longer considered safe. Still, try to earn the hugs and then kindly decline them, reinforcing the importance of social distancing.

Follow-up

Consider a phone follow-up to review the examination findings with a coach or family member if that person was not present at the examination.

Send a written thorough rehabilitation plan with patient goals.

As COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, consider a more frequent follow-up interval to ensure goals were not overlooked in haste during a shortened examination.

Refer a patient for home-based occupational therapy as needed. The American Occupational Therapy Association lists recommendations for safe provision of home-based care, which is still allowed.8 Home care will allow vision-impaired patients to follow stay-at-home guidelines while receiving additional occupational therapy training.

Related: More research coming on drug delivery via contact lenses

Summary

Patients needing visual rehabilitation are looking to optometrists for their health and safety in living with low vision. Deferring care and providing care must be balanced.

In the era of COVID-19, optometry visits have visibly changed to maintain safety recommendations. ODs need to ensure that these changes for patients with visual challenges accommodate their particular needs.

References

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Common eye disorders. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/ basics/ced/index.html. Accessed 9/18/20.

2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How to Protect Yourself & Others. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/ coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/what-you-can-do.html. Accessed 9/18/20.

3. Zhang X, McKeever Bullard K, Cotch MF, Wilson MR, Rovner BW, McGwin Jr G, Owsley C, Barker L, Crews JE Saaddine JB. Association between depression and functional vision loss in persons 20 years of age or older in the United States, NHANES 2005-2008. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2013 May;131(5):573-581.

4. Panchal N, Kamal R, Orgera K, Cox C, Garfield R, Hamel L, Muana C, Chidambaram P. The implications of COVID-19 for mental health and substance use. Kaiser Family Foundation. Available at: https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/issue-brief/the-implications-of-covid-19-for-mental-health-and-substance-use/. Accessed 9/18/20.

5. Horowitz A, Reinhardt JP, Boerner K. The effect of rehabilitation on depression among visually disabled older adults. Aging Ment Health. 2005 Nov;9(6):563-570.

6. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Is my test, item, or service covered? Available at: https://www.medicare. gov/coverage/telehealth. Accessed 9/18/20.

7. American Optometric Association. COVID-19 latest updates. Available at: https://www.aoa.org/covid-19/covid-19-latest-updates?sso=y. Accessed 9/25/20.

8. American Occupational Therapy Association. Home health occupational therapydecision guide for COVID-19. Available at: https://www.aota.org/~/media/Corporate/Files/Practice/ Health/COVID-19-Home-Health-Decision-Guide.pdf. Accessed 9/18/20.

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Vision rehabilitation care for low vision patients in the COVID-19 era - Optometry Times

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Queen Elizabeth and Sophie, the Coutess of Wessex Team Up for a Joint Video Call – TownandCountrymag.com

Thursday, October 15th, 2020

As the coronavirus pandemic continues, precautions are being taken to safeguard Queen Elizabeth's health, as her age puts her at risk for severe illness should she contract COVID-19. But despite social distancing at Windsor Castle, the British monarch is continuing to work, and to take her duties seriously.

Yesterday, she joined her daughter-in-law, Sophie the Countess of Wessex, on a video call for a conversation to mark World Sight Day. Sophie is the Global Ambassador for the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness, a cause close to her heart as her daughter Lady Louise has overcome a condition of the eyes known as strabismus.

"Her squint was quite profound when she was tiny and it takes time to correct it," Sophie shared in an interview several years ago. "You've got to make sure one eye doesn't become more dominant than the other but she's fine nowher eyesight is perfect."

Per Buckingham Palace, the pair of royal women spoke with leaders in the eye health fields, "about the powerful impact that good quality eye care can have on peoples livesenabling children to benefit from education; working adults to keep their jobs; and older people to participate in their families and communities."

The group also "discussed the challenges the sector has faced during recent months as a result of the global pandemic," and "shared their hopes for the future and the opportunities and innovations that will continue to improve eye care and strengthen eye health in the next decade."

News of the video call comes shortly after Buckingham Palace confirmed that Sophie is self-isolating following contact with someone who subsequently tested positive for COVID-19.

Earlier today a spokesperson released the following statement:

She has not been in physical contact with her mother-in-law Queen Elizabeth since she was in contact with said person.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

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Queen Elizabeth and Sophie, the Coutess of Wessex Team Up for a Joint Video Call - TownandCountrymag.com

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