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Archive for the ‘Integrative Medicine’ Category

Getting to Know Kate Roth at Beacon Integrative Medical Center in Rexburg – East Idaho News

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

EastIdahoNews.com is highlighting hardworking people who make our local businesses a success. Every Sunday, were Getting to Know YOU!

1. Name, job title and company: Kate Roth MSN, ARNP, FNP-C, WHNP-BCP, ARBHRT-C Nurse Practitioner and Medical Director for Beacon Specialty and Family Practice

2. What does your company do and what are your responsibilities? We provide an array of family medicine services. I specialize in comprehensive womens healthcare and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. She treats thyroid disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome, infertility and vaginal rejuvenation treatment. I also perform annual wellness examinations, family planning, treatment of migraine headache, pre-marital exams and bio-identical hormone pellet insertion for men and women. My responsibilities as medical director include maintaining compliance with regulatory state board regulations, HIPAA security services, staff training and competency evaluation in accordance with state and federal law.

3. Where were you born and when is your birthday (dont need to include year)? Champaign, Illinois, October 2

4. How long have you lived in eastern Idaho and what city do you live in now? Ive lived in eastern Idaho for 18 years. (Didnt want to say the city she lives in).

5. Tell us about your first job after high school/college. Hired as staff, then charge RN for the University of Illinois at Chicagos first bone, or stem cell, transplant center.

6. What is the best business decision youve ever made? Partnering with Beacon Integrative Medical Center.

7. Tell us about your family. Wonderful husband, three children all active in sports and school activities. We enjoy doing anonymous service projects, hiking, watching movies, reading books, traveling, and skiing together.

8. Tell us about a movie or book that has inspired you the most in life. (Didnt want to answer)

9. Tell us about a lesson you learned from a mistake you made in your career/business. Corporate healthcare is not for me. I believe in providing compassionate, comprehensive healthcare and making sure my patients feel heard.

10. What is a goal you hope to accomplish in the next 12 months? Grow personally, physically, spiritually and professionally. Always learning!

11. What is one piece of advice you have for someone who wants to do what youre doing? Listen to and love your patients.

12. If you could do it all over again, what would you do differently? Nothing at all. I am thrilled to be who and where I am today.

13. Where is your favorite place to eat in eastern Idaho? Home!

14. Tell us something surprising about yourself. (Didnt want to answer)

15. How do you like your potatoes? Roasted with garden-fresh herbs.

If you have an employee or co-worker who we should get to know, email rett@eastidahonews.com.

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UCI-led study first to reveal specific molecular mechanism that controls the transition from acute to chronic pain – Newswise

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Newswise Irvine, Calif., Oct. 22, 2021 A new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers is the first to reveal the specific molecular mechanism that controls the transition from acute to chronic pain, and identifies this mechanism as a critical target for disease-modifying medicines.

Findings from the study, titled NAAA-regulated lipid signaling governs the transition from acute to chronic pain, published today in Science Advances, show that disabling N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA)an intracellularenzymein the spinal cord during a 72-hour time window following peripheral tissue injury halts chronic pain development in male and female mice.

Delineating the nature, localization and timing of the events involved in pain chronicity is necessary to pinpointing control nodes in the process that can be targeted by new classes of disease-modifying medicines beyond analgesics, said Daniele Piomelli, Distinguished Professor in the UCI School of Medicine Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology. This study is the first to identify that NAAA, a previously unrecognized control node, can be effectively targeted by small-molecule therapeutics that inhibit this enzyme, and block the transition from acute to chronic pain.

Chronic pain evolves from acute pain caused by the physical trauma of tissue damage due to surgery or injury and is a massive problem, affecting more than 1.5 billion people worldwide. Chronic pain continues long past tissue healing, is often resistant to therapy, and remains seriously undertreated. Treatment is largely dependent on a handful of analgesic drug classes such as opioids, which may lose effectiveness over time and can also lead to addiction. Nerve damage is considered to be a critical factor in the transition to chronic pain, but the underlying molecular events leading to its emergence have been poorly understood.

Our findings suggest a new class of drugs NAAA inhibitors can be used to treat various forms of chronic pain and in preventing incisional and inflammatory injuries following surgery, Piomelli said.

This work was funded by grants R41NS106999, R42DA033683 and DA041229 from the National Institutes of Health.

About the UCI School of Medicine: Each year, the UCI School of Medicine educates more than 400 medical students, and nearly 150 doctoral and masters students. More than 700 residents and fellows are trained at UCI Medical Center and affiliated institutions. The School of Medicine offers an MD; a dual MD/PhD medical scientist training program; and PhDs and masters degrees in anatomy and neurobiology, biomedical sciences, genetic counseling, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, pathology, pharmacology, physiology and biophysics, and translational sciences. Medical students also may pursue an MD/MBA., an MD/masters in public health, or an MD/masters degree through one of three mission-based programs: Health Education to Advance Leaders in Integrative Medicine (HEAL-IM), Leadership Education to Advance Diversity-African, Black and Caribbean (LEAD-ABC), and the Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC). The UCI School of Medicine is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Accreditation and ranks among the top 50 nationwide for research. For more information, visit som.uci.edu.

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Why a Hot-Water Bottle Is the Key to Staying CozyAnd Easing Period CrampsThis Winter – Vogue

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Our grandmothers have passed on many wise tips for moving through life, from beauty secrets to home remedies for everyday ailments. Among the top? Always have a hot-water bottle at the ready to help you with everything from relieving period cramps to warming your feet before bed on a chilly night.

To menstruate is to know that period symptoms are always in flux and that even the change of season can dramatically impact them. Come fall, we tend to exercise less and eat richer, heartier foods, which can exacerbate PMS symptoms, especially cramps. One of the most tried-and-true remedies to ease aches and pains is applying heat to the lower abdomen with a hot-water bottle. It helps soothe the tense muscles associated with cramping, explains Sherry Ross, M.D., a Santa Monica ob-gyn. Heat works by relaxing the muscles of the uterus, which increases blood flow and ultimately helps ease the pain.

And its not just helpful for abdominal cramps but for other parts of the body under stress too. Many women also get neck pain during their period due to the general muscle cramping and drop in magnesium and progesterone before their cycle, so a hot-water bottle is a great home remedy for this, explains integrative-medicine physician Taz Bhatia, M.D. There is also the psychological impact of warmth giving us a feeling of relief, adds Dr. Bhatia, citing findings that show that exposure to warm temperature can elevate a persons mood. (Hence the enduring appeal of using a hot-water bottle to keep your feet toasty on a nippy night by placing it at the foot of the bed.)

To up the cozy factor of your hot-water-bottle session, there are a variety of covers to accessorizeand snuggle up withduring the colder months. There are sumptuous classics made from cable knits or faux fur, as well as even more elevated designs, like the silk chinoiserie-print offerings from The Beauty Sleeper. Shop the most practical and stylish options below.

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Is This The Best Walking Routine For Longevity & Overall Health? – mindbodygreen.com

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

"Thirty minutes a day is a good goal for movement," Shah writes on Instagram. However, she notes that you don't necessarily need to dedicate all of those 30 minutes to the gym. "Even if you don't work out on a treadmill and you just move around all day for a total of 10 to 20,000 stepsthat is enough of a workout. You really don't have to have a formal or gym workout, at least cardio-wise."

So if a 30-minute treadmill walk fits into your schedulegreat! But just know that you can reap the cardio benefits from NEAT movement (or non-exercise activity thermogenesis), as well.

Aside from the cardio itself, the incline plays a significant role: "Walking up a hill is a great cardiovascular exercise and also has some resistance built in as you are walking [on an] incline," says Shah. In fact, research has shown resistance training is top-notch for healthy aging and longevityShah says you might want to incorporate proper strength training as well to increase muscle mass, but the incline is a great start.

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Naturopathic Medical Organizations Jointly Issue White Paper on Whole-Person Care to Commemorate International Day of Natural Medicine – goskagit.com

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Country

United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth of theCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People's Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People's Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory South of 60 deg S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People's Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, Kingdom ofBelizeBenin, People's Republic ofBermudaBhutan, Kingdom ofBolivia, Republic ofBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswana, Republic ofBouvet Island (Bouvetoya)Brazil, Federative Republic ofBritish Indian Ocean Territory (Chagos Archipelago)British Virgin IslandsBrunei DarussalamBulgaria, People's Republic ofBurkina FasoBurundi, Republic ofCambodia, Kingdom ofCameroon, United Republic ofCape Verde, Republic ofCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChad, Republic ofChile, Republic ofChina, People's Republic ofChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombia, Republic ofComoros, Union of theCongo, Democratic Republic ofCongo, People's Republic ofCook IslandsCosta Rica, Republic ofCote D'Ivoire, Ivory Coast, Republic of theCyprus, Republic ofCzech RepublicDenmark, Kingdom ofDjibouti, Republic ofDominica, Commonwealth ofEcuador, Republic ofEgypt, Arab Republic ofEl Salvador, Republic ofEquatorial Guinea, Republic ofEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFaeroe IslandsFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Fiji, Republic of the Fiji IslandsFinland, Republic ofFrance, French RepublicFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabon, Gabonese RepublicGambia, Republic of theGeorgiaGermanyGhana, Republic ofGibraltarGreece, Hellenic RepublicGreenlandGrenadaGuadaloupeGuamGuatemala, Republic ofGuinea, RevolutionaryPeople's Rep'c ofGuinea-Bissau, Republic ofGuyana, Republic ofHeard and McDonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)Honduras, Republic ofHong Kong, Special Administrative Region of ChinaHrvatska (Croatia)Hungary, Hungarian People's RepublicIceland, Republic ofIndia, Republic ofIndonesia, Republic ofIran, Islamic Republic ofIraq, Republic ofIrelandIsrael, State ofItaly, Italian RepublicJapanJordan, Hashemite Kingdom ofKazakhstan, Republic ofKenya, Republic ofKiribati, Republic ofKorea, Democratic People's Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwait, State ofKyrgyz RepublicLao People's Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanon, Lebanese RepublicLesotho, Kingdom ofLiberia, Republic ofLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtenstein, Principality ofLithuaniaLuxembourg, Grand Duchy ofMacao, Special Administrative Region of ChinaMacedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascar, Republic ofMalawi, Republic ofMalaysiaMaldives, Republic ofMali, Republic ofMalta, Republic ofMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritania, Islamic Republic ofMauritiusMayotteMicronesia, Federated States ofMoldova, Republic ofMonaco, Principality ofMongolia, Mongolian People's RepublicMontserratMorocco, Kingdom ofMozambique, People's Republic ofMyanmarNamibiaNauru, Republic ofNepal, Kingdom ofNetherlands AntillesNetherlands, Kingdom of theNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaragua, Republic ofNiger, Republic of theNigeria, Federal Republic ofNiue, Republic ofNorfolk IslandNorthern Mariana IslandsNorway, Kingdom ofOman, Sultanate ofPakistan, Islamic Republic ofPalauPalestinian Territory, OccupiedPanama, Republic ofPapua New GuineaParaguay, Republic ofPeru, Republic ofPhilippines, Republic of thePitcairn IslandPoland, Polish People's RepublicPortugal, Portuguese RepublicPuerto RicoQatar, State ofReunionRomania, Socialist Republic ofRussian FederationRwanda, Rwandese RepublicSamoa, Independent State ofSan Marino, Republic ofSao Tome and Principe, Democratic Republic ofSaudi Arabia, Kingdom ofSenegal, Republic ofSerbia and MontenegroSeychelles, Republic ofSierra Leone, Republic ofSingapore, Republic ofSlovakia (Slovak Republic)SloveniaSolomon IslandsSomalia, Somali RepublicSouth Africa, Republic ofSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSpain, Spanish StateSri Lanka, Democratic Socialist Republic ofSt. HelenaSt. Kitts and NevisSt. LuciaSt. Pierre and MiquelonSt. Vincent and the GrenadinesSudan, Democratic Republic of theSuriname, Republic ofSvalbard & Jan Mayen IslandsSwaziland, Kingdom ofSweden, Kingdom ofSwitzerland, Swiss ConfederationSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwan, Province of ChinaTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailand, Kingdom ofTimor-Leste, Democratic Republic ofTogo, Togolese RepublicTokelau (Tokelau Islands)Tonga, Kingdom ofTrinidad and Tobago, Republic ofTunisia, Republic ofTurkey, Republic ofTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUganda, Republic ofUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited Kingdom of Great Britain & N. IrelandUruguay, Eastern Republic ofUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofViet Nam, Socialist Republic ofWallis and Futuna IslandsWestern SaharaYemenZambia, Republic ofZimbabwe

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UCI-led study suggests new molecular target for therapeutic interventions aimed at C. difficile infection – EurekAlert

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

image:The VPI10463 and M68 represent the classic and the hypervirulent C. difficile, respectively. GTD-VPI preferentially modifies Rho family GTPases (Cdc42, for example) by glucosylation, while GTD-M68 more effectively modifies R-Ras. Due to their different selectivity toward Rho or Ras family GTPases, these two different TcdB variants cause two distinct types of cytopathic effects. view more

Credit: UCI School of Medicine

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 22, 2021 A University of California, Irvine-led study suggests that the glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) is an ideal molecular target for therapeutic interventions for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI). These findings may lead to new treatments to fight this deadly disease.

Based on their findings that established the structural basis for Toxin B recognition of the small GTPases Rho and R-Ras families, the study, titled Structural basis for selective modification of Rho and Ras GTPases by Clostridioides difficile toxin B, was published today in Sciences Advances.

CDI is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and gastroenteritis-associated deaths worldwide, accounting for 500,000 cases and 29,000 deaths annually in the U.S. Classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as one of the top health threats. There is growing global concern surrounding the emerge and spread of hypervirulent C. difficile strains, resembling the occurrence of new virus variants in current COVID pandemic. TcdB is one of two homologous C. difficile exotoxins, and TcdB alone is capable of causing the full spectrum of CDI diseases.

We focused on the structure and function of TcdBs crucial GTD, which is the toxins warhead. The GTD is delivered by the toxin inside the host cells and causes most of the cytosolic damage to patients, said Rongsheng Jin, PhD, professor in the Department of Physiology & Biophysics at the UCI School of Medicine, and corresponding author. We discovered molecular mechanisms by which the GTD specifically recognizes and blocks the physiological functions of the human GTPases Rho and R-Ras enzyme families that are crucial signaling molecules.

The team also demonstrated how the classic form of TcdB and the hypervirulent TcdB recognize their human targets in different ways, which leads to distinct structural changes to the host cells caused by bacterial invasion.

Once the GTD of TcdB is inside the cells, it is shielded by our cells and becomes inaccessible to passive immunotherapy. But our studies suggest that small molecule inhibitors could be developed to disarm the GTD, which will directly eliminate the root cause of disease symptoms and cellular damage, Jin said. This new strategy can potentially be integrated with and complement other CDI treatment regiments.

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health under awards R01AI125704, R21AI139690, R21AI123920, R01NS080833, R01AI132387, R01AI139087 and R21 CA235533.

Team members also include Zheng Liu and Peng Chen from the UCI Department of Physiology & Biophysics; Sical Chang, Songhai Tian, Ji Zeng, and Min Dong, Department of Urology, Boston Childrens Hospital, and Department of Microbiology and Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston; and Kay Perry, NE-CAT and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; and Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois.

About the UCI School of Medicine: Each year, the UCI School of Medicine educates more than 400 medical students, and nearly 150 doctoral and masters students. More than 700 residents and fellows are trained at UCI Medical Center and affiliated institutions. The School of Medicine offers an M.D.; a dual M.D./Ph.D. medical scientist training program; and Ph.D.s and masters degrees in anatomy and neurobiology, biomedical sciences, genetic counseling, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, pathology, pharmacology, physiology and biophysics, and translational sciences. Medical students also may pursue an M.D./M.B.A., an M.D./masters in public health, or an M.D./masters degree through one of three mission-based programs: Health Education to Advance Leaders in Integrative Medicine (HEAL-IM), Leadership Education to Advance Diversity-African, Black and Caribbean (LEAD-ABC), and the Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC). The UCI School of Medicine is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Accreditation and ranks among the top 50 nationwide for research. For more information, visit som.uci.edu.

Experimental study

Cells

Structural basis for selective modification of Rho and Ras GTPases by Clostridioides difficile toxin B

22-Oct-2021

Authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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The Surprising Reason Going Keto Can Mess With Your Sleep + How To Fix It – mindbodygreen.com

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

But let us emphasize complex carbs here: This does not mean you should dig into a bowl of potato chips before bed. You still want to choose foods with a low glycemic index in order to keep your blood sugar balanced. (Because, friendly reminder, your blood sugar also affects your shut-eye.) Some of the best nutrient-dense sources of complex carbs include sweet potatoes, beets, squash, and carrotsbut check out our full guide to keto carb cycling, if you're curious.

Bonus points if you choose foods rich in magnesium, too, as the mineral is important for a bunch of functions in the body, including sleep.* Some favorites include chickpeas, bananas, pumpkin seeds, and we could go on (so we'll just send you here for a quick recap).

And if you'd like even more of a nudge before bed, you can lean on sleep supplements clinically shown to have a calming effect on the brain. Our very own sleep support+ was designed withleading researchers and physicians to help you fall asleep faster, stay asleep longer, and wake up feeling more refreshed, featuring 120 mg of highly absorbable and gentle magnesium bisglycinate with jujube seed extract and PharmaGABA.* It's a well-rounded supplement free of GMOs, gluten, dairy, soy, and food allergens, and it can seamlessly fit into any lifestyle.

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Are you keeping up with the Aaron Rodgers Book Club? Here are all of his recommended reads so far – Green Bay Press Gazette

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

The NFL's reigning MVP isn't likely to unseat book club queens Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon orJenna Bush Hager anytime soon, but his Aaron Rodgers Book Club is rolling right along.

Each Tuesday during his appearance on "The Pat McAfee Show," the Green Bay Packers quarterback ends his segment by revealing a recommended book. An avidreader, Rodgers told McAfee he started thinking about the idea after Packers wide receiver Marquez Valdes-Scantling asked him for a starter packof recommended reads during training camp.

His inaugural book club pick, "The Alchemist," got a retweet from its author. Rodgers has saidhe's heard from others who have thanked himfor talking about reading.

"We need more people reading and (less) people spending time sitting on their ass watching TV and other bull----," hesaid on the show.

Brown CountyLibrary, which hasnine locations in the greater Green Bay area, has noticed an uptick in interestin the seven titles Rodgers hasrecommended to date, particularly since October, said Susan Lagerman, the library's community engagement manager. Several of the titles are checked out and others have waiting lists, she said.

Rodgers, who told McAfee he has a stack of 30 books he wants to get to, reads mostly nonfiction and leans toward philosophical, spiritual and self-help titles. He plans to choose 18 books through the season.

All proceeds from the saleof Aaron Rodgers Book ClubT-shirts through McAfee's online merchandise store will be donated to a reading advocacy program of Rodgers' choice.

Here's a breakdown of his picks so far:

Recommended on: Oct. 19 (two days after the "I still own you" Packers-Chicago Bears game)

Quick summary: Writtenmore than 2,000 years ago in ancient China, it's the first known study of the planning and conduct of military operations, but its reach extends beyond battlefield maneuvers to business, politics and personal conflicts. Among the classic'sfamed quotes:It is easy to love your friend, but sometimes the hardest lesson to learn is to love your enemy."

Rodgers' take: "It's a book that I think most great leaders have read at some point ... A lot of great wisdom in here and one-liners that you can use in your life and in press conferences down the road as well and in speeches to your team when you're trying to fire up the boys."

Recommended on: Oct. 12

Quick summary:Chopra, world-renowned as an author and speaker on integrative medicine and personal transformation,teams up with physicist Menas Kafatos to explore questions about time, space, the universe and humans' place in it.

Rodgers' take:He just finished reading the 2017 book and admits it's "a super dense book" with "some crazy concepts." At 288 pages, it's also one of the longer books he has chosen.

Recommended on: Oct. 5

Quick summary: First published in 1997, the long-running New York Times bestseller explores four agreements people can make with themselves to find happiness and freedom. They are: Be impeccable with your word; don't take anything personally; don't make assumptions; and always do your best.Winfrey has heralded the book three times on her television shows, in 2000, 2001 and 2013, resulting in huge sales spikes each time.

Rodgers' take: It's his go-to title when someone hits him up for a self-help book recommendation. It's a simple read at 140 pages and one he thinks everyone can relate to, especially the agreement about not to take thingspersonally.

"I think that'sthe motivation for most comments on social media," Rodgers said. "Somebody has said something and then somebody takes it personally and then they have to fire back."

RELATED: A full fridge and bidets: Randall Cobb talks about the perks of staying at Aaron Rodgers house

RELATED: Comedian Bert Kreischer hangs out with Aaron Rodgers, squeezes into tiny Packers jersey

Recommended on: Sept. 28

Quick summary: A 1971 book that offers guidance on meditation, yogaand finding your true self from the famed guru of the spiritual movement in America. It took off during the hippie movement in the '70s, offering readers a way to find peace, calmness andhigher states of consciousness without psychedelics and deliveringthe ultimate message tolive in the present.

Rodgers' take:"It's a good intro book, I think, for anybody interested in needing inspiration on their journey to a new type of spirituality. Some incredible quotes in here and a book that really meant a lot to me."

Honorary mention:It's not an official ARBC selection, but Rodgers did give a shoutout to"Chuck Norris CannotBe Stopped:400 All-New Facts About the Man Who Knows Neither Fear Nor Mercy" by Ian Spector, mostly because he ran across a copy on his home bookshelf.

Recommended on: Sept. 21

Quick summary: TheAmericanyoung adultnovel follows 12-year-old Jonas in a society that at first appears to beutopianbut is later revealed to bedystopianas the haunting story goes on. It won the 1994 Newbery Medal, awarded annually by the American Library Associationfor the most distinguished American children's book published the previous year.

Rodgers' take: "This book was on reading lists when I was growing up. It still stands up. It's, in my opinion, super relatable to what we're going through as a society now." Rodgers has read it four times.

Recommended on: Sept. 14

Quick summary: The story of the Arizona Cardinals safety who gave up a $3.6 million contractafter 9/11 to enlist in the U.S. Army and become an Army Ranger. Sent first to Iraq and then Afghanistan, Tillman was killed in 2004 by friendly fire, the details of whichwerekept from his family and the American public for several weeks after his death.

Rodgers' take: "One of my legitimate all-time favorites by an author who I have read many, many of his books."

Rodgers said he has given the book away so many times for others to read that he had to run to Barnes & Noble to pick up a copy for the segment.

"The best part about it is learning more about Pat Tillman, and Pat, which I didn't know, he's a deep thinker and, like myself, kind of grew up in and around the church but at some point really dove into Eastern religions and meditationand philosophyand journaling. He was a very curious guy and he had a lot of interests outside of football."

Recommended on: Sept. 7

Quick summary: First published in 1988, the international bestseller by the Brazilian author tells thestory of an Andalusian shepherd boy who yearns to travel in search of a worldly treasure. His quest ends up taking him to riches of a different kind. No. 70 on the list of 100 most-loved books from PBS' "The Great American Read,"itoffers lessons about listening to your heart, recognizing opportunity and following your dreams.

Rodgers' take:"One of my all-time favorite books, and it's an easy book, and it'sfiction, which, I don't read a lot of fiction, but it's been around for a long, long time."

Rodgers, who just finished reading itagain during training camp, highlighted some of his favorite excerpts with a blue marker somethinghe often does with books he reads.

ContactKendra Meinertat 920-431-8347 or kmeinert@greenbay.gannett.com. Follow her on Twitter @KendraMeinert.

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Drinking Tea in The Morning: Is It Good For Your Health? – CL Charlotte

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

-All Dates- Today Tomorrow This Weekend This Week -------------------- Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27 Thursday, October 28 Friday, October 29 Saturday, October 30 Sunday, October 31 Monday, November 1 Tuesday, November 2 Wednesday, November 3 Thursday, November 4 Friday, November 5 Saturday, November 6 Sunday, November 7 Monday, November 8 Tuesday, November 9 Wednesday, November 10 Thursday, November 11 Friday, November 12 Saturday, November 13 Sunday, November 14 Monday, November 15 Tuesday, November 16 Wednesday, November 17 Thursday, November 18 Friday, November 19 Saturday, November 20 Sunday, November 21 Monday, November 22 Tuesday, November 23 Wednesday, November 24 Thursday, November 25 -All Event Categories- ARTS AGENDA Classical Music Comedy Film Museums Readings & Signings Spoken Word Theater/Dance/Performance Art Visual Arts COMMUNITY HAPPENINGS Benefits & Fundraisers Clubs & Organizations Family Festivals/Events Gay & Lesbian Health & Fitness Holiday Lectures, Classes & Seminars Nightlife Sex & Love Singles Sports & Recreation Support Groups Volunteers/Public Life FOOD & DRINK Culinary Wine/Cocktails MUSIC EVENTS Blues/Roots/International Classical/Jazz/Smooth Country/Folk DJ/Electronic General Hip-Hop/Soul/R&B Pop/Rock

-All Dates- Today Tomorrow This Weekend This Week -------------------- Tuesday, October 26 Wednesday, October 27 Thursday, October 28 Friday, October 29 Saturday, October 30 Sunday, October 31 Monday, November 1 Tuesday, November 2 Wednesday, November 3 Thursday, November 4 Friday, November 5 Saturday, November 6 Sunday, November 7 Monday, November 8 Tuesday, November 9 Wednesday, November 10 Thursday, November 11 Friday, November 12 Saturday, November 13 Sunday, November 14 Monday, November 15 Tuesday, November 16 Wednesday, November 17 Thursday, November 18 Friday, November 19 Saturday, November 20 Sunday, November 21 Monday, November 22 Tuesday, November 23 Wednesday, November 24 Thursday, November 25 -All Neighborhoods- NORTH CHARLOTTE Concord/Kannapolis Cornelius Dilworth Huntersville NoDa North End Northlake University Davidson Mooresville SOUTH CHARLOTTE Ballantyne Madison Park/Montford Matthews SouthPark Myers Park South End Pineville/Hwy 51 Steele Creek South Charlotte Cotswold CENTRAL CHARLOTTE General Charlotte Area Midtown Uptown EAST SIDE East Charlotte Elizabeth Plaza Midwood WEST CHARLOTTE Beatties Ford Road Corridor FreeMore West Gastonia Westside SOUTH CAROLINA Fort Mill Rock Hill OUTSIDE CHARLOTTE Outside Charlotte

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Seven health checks to have once you turn 40 – Telegraph.co.uk

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Turning 40 feels like a milestone and, with life expectancy still hovering around 81 years for adults in the UK, it does indeed mark a halfway point. Undeniably, the body starts to work against us as we enter midlife and not just by making those unwelcome grunts when we ease into an armchair.

The risk of cancer starts to increase, as the cells become more damaged over time; for women the perimenopause may begin at this stage. Meanwhile, our body composition changes after the age of 30 we lose around 3-5 per cent of muscle per decade unless we include strength training in our regimes, and midlifers can find their waistline expanding, though whether this is down to the metabolism slowing down, or an increased cheese and wine habit, remains the subject of debate.

But lots of these downsides of ageing can be managed or even prevented by lifestyle tweaks; studies show that adopting healthy habits can decrease cancer risk by as much as 40 per cent. So if youre in your 40s, one of the best things you can do is have a health check.

From the age of 40, a full health screening should be a key date in your diary each year, Dr Ursula Levine, General Practitioner (Integrative Medicine), at Lanserhof at The Arts Club says. The earlier a change in your health is detected, the more efficient the treatment can be.

The NHS offer a free health check for over-40s every five years to check for early signs of stroke, kidney disease, heart disease, type 2 diabetes or dementia. But there are plenty of tests you can do at home, too...

Leading diabetes scientist Dr Roy Taylor recently said not being able to fit into the trousers you wore in your 20s can be a sign you are carrying too much fat and at risk of type 2 diabetes.

Waist size is an important indicator of health because fat stored around the middle can be especially harmful, building up around organs such as the liver and pancreas and raising the risk of insulin resistance and metabolic and cardiovascular disease.

But the jean size test is a bit rudimentary. Dr Michael Mosley, who created the 5:2 diet, has a different marker of good health. We know the waist to height ratio is a useful indicator of health ideally your waist circumference should be at most half of your height, he says. But you dont need a tape measure just grab a piece of string that is as long as you are tall. Fold it in half and see if it fits around your waist.

If it doesnt, dont panic, but it is something to work on. Reducing your waist circumference to half your height will likely improve your long-term health and boost your immunity, Dr Mosley adds.

If you want a quick test to see how your heart is coping, climb four flights of stairs (60 steps) and time yourself. If it takes you more than one-and-a-half minutes to ascend four flights of stairs, your health is sub-optimal, and it would be a good idea to consult a doctor, says Dr Jess Peteiro, a cardiologist at University Hospital A Corua, Spain, who presented his research at the European Society of Cardiology conference last year.

A recent study published in the journal Jama Network Open found that getting fit in your 40s and 50s lowers the risk of early death by about 35 per cent and is particularly protective against heart disease.

Women of all ages but particularly those in their 40s and upwards should check their breasts regularly. Dr Zoe Williams, the GP and broadcaster, recommends doing this ideally once a month and says that its not just lumps we should look out for. There are many different signs such as irritation or dimpling of the skin on the breast or flaky skin in the nipple area, she says. If you notice any unusual changes, its important to contact your GP as soon as possible.

Breast cancer screening is offered on the NHS from the age of 50. It is not recommended before then because theres not enough evidence that it would reduce deaths, and the tests have risks as well, says Sophia Lowes at Cancer Research UK.

Other red flag symptoms to have investigated include unusual lumps anywhere on your body, appetite loss, heavy night sweats and blood in stools. If you do notice something unusual, tell your doctor, Lowes says.

The ability to balance on one leg is a strong indicator of longevity and health, according to a study by the Medical Research Council, which tracked 5,000 people born in 1946 throughout their lives. Those who could balance on one leg for more than 10 seconds with eyes closed, and then to stand up and sit down in a chair 37 times in 60 seconds or 35 times for women tended to have a better life expectancy when they revisited them 13 years later.

Balance is something we take for granted, Dr Mosley says. It enables you to move confidently through life but unfortunately, our balance deteriorates when you hit your 40s. The brain uses messages from receptors in our inner ear, eyes, muscles and joints to keep us upright. If our balance is off, it can be an overall marker of decline of brain health.

Practising standing on one leg once a day is a simple way to improve your posture and balance. When Im brushing my teeth, I set a timer, and stand on one leg, switching from one leg to the other. Each day, try and increase the number of seconds and try and work up to a minute if possible, says Dr Mosley.

Nearly 40 per cent of adults have high or borderline high cholesterol, according to NHS statistics, and levels increase with age. The NHS advises asking for a test if you are 40 and over and havent had a test before, especially if high cholesterol or heart problems run in your family. High cholesterol has no symptoms, so the only way to tell is a blood test.

Blood pressure also rises with age, thanks to a reduction in elastic tissue in your arteries, and again it can be symptomless. Around 90 per cent of patients have no symptoms, says Dr Nighat Arif, a GP based in Buckinghamshire. But high blood pressure can have life changing effects, such as triggering a heart attack or stroke, damaging your kidneys or even losing your vision.

Women in particular need to be aware of raised blood pressure; researchers from Norway reported earlier this year that even slightly elevated readings from the age of 40 were a strong risk factor for a heart attack in the next 16 years.

170,000 Britons die a year due to heart attacks, strokes and circulatory conditions, according to Cambridge University research, and cutting your cholesterol and blood pressure through quitting smoking, exercising, losing weight and reducing salt can reduce the risk by four fifths.

Spinal degeneration and back problems become more common after the age of 40, says osteopath Nadia Alibhai. To protect the long term health of your back, she says keeping flexible is absolutely key.

In an ideal world, we should be able to touch our toes in our 40s, as it displays flexibility in your lower back, glutes, ankles and hamstrings. Flexibility is needed for proper blood circulation and muscle elasticity; touching the toes helps prevent muscles from contracting and becoming short and tight.

A study published in the journal Heart and Circulatory Physiology found that being able to touch your toes could mean that your arteries are in good shape, too. Researchers found a correlation between poor flexibility and atherosclerosis in a group of people aged 40 and above.

If you cant get down that far, you need to practise. If youre struggling, start with a slow forward fold, Alibhai says. Stretch upwards and lengthen your spine before folding forwards. Keep your spine straight and if you need to bend your knees, please do. Dont push yourself too far, slow and steady wins the race.

Im seeing so many people with back problems at the moment, says Dr Arif, and they are usually posture related from hunching over screens. If you know you can touch your toes, then you are extending the spinal cord and sciatic nerve and you know youve got good flexibility.

Your GP is trained to check moles, and you can ask them to do just that. However: I would always recommend getting a regular (once yearly) mole check at a specialist clinic once you turn 40, says Dr David Jack, an aesthetic doctor and skincare expert. Specialist mole clinics do this every day so if there is something unusual that might not be recognised by a GP then it can be quickly diagnosed and treated right away.

For Dr Michael Mosleys recipes to help with weight loss visit http://www.thefast800.com

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Everything You Need to Know About Health is Wealth Nutrition – Step Out Buffalo

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

This article is a paid promotion sponsored by an SOB advertiser and designed to share valuable info with our readers.

Living a healthy lifestyle can positively impact your physical health, of course, but it can also work wonders for your emotional, mental, and spiritual health.

Holistic nutrition is about so much more than counting calories. Its about identifying the root causes of illnesses and imbalances in order to improve your overall health.

This whole-person approach is exactly why Yen Ngo decided to become a dietitian. She truly believes food is medicine and shes personally seen what a consistent healthy diet and lifestyle can do for someones health.

Yen Ngo is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) who has been practicing locally for 3 years now. She launched Health is Wealth Nutrition in February of 2020 to teach nutrition the way she sees it.

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Yen Ngo focuses on Integrative and Functional Nutrition (IFN) Therapy which is also known as holistic nutrition. Many people get caught up in the calories for weight loss but Yen considers other aspects of life that can affect weight gain or weight loss, such as sleep and stress.

Yens niche is specifically in digestive issues. She is dedicated to creating solutions for anyone who struggles with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), irritable bowel disease (crohns disease and ulcerative colitis), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), chronic constipation, GERD/heartburn/reflux, or those who suspect they may have food sensitivities or food intolerances.

Through her approach to health, she helps her clients choose foods that make them feel their best in all areas of wellness. Losing weight is a bonus, rather than the sole focus.

Yen takes the time to really get to know her clients during an initial consultation. She learns all about your family history and looks for genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors that can influence your health. Her work also includes therapeutic diets, dietary supplements, gut-healing protocols, mind-body practices, conventional and functional lab testing and more to find the right solution for your needs.

When you leave Yens office, youll have a comprehensive, personalized plan you can follow for the rest of your life. You can expect to have at least 2 followup appointments and can continue seeing her as medically necessary.

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Yen Ngo offers Nutrition Counseling also known as Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) which can be used to treat chronic diseases and conditions such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes.

It begins with an initial consultation and involves creating a personalized nutrition plan to address your specific health and wellness goals. The best part? Its covered by a variety of insurance plans.

If conventional dieting hasnt worked for you in the past, this self-paced online course was written for you. The Restore and Reclaim Your Health Nutrition Program goes far beyond eating less and exercising more and helps you identify the reasons why you struggle with weight loss and guides you to create balanced meals.

This course is all about providing you the knowledge and skills you need to improve your overall health and wellness. It includes unlimited access to the online program, a paper booklet, an eBook, and audio with presentation slides.

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Are you ready to start your health journey and feel your best once and for all? If so, contact Yen today for a free 15-minute discovery call!

656 N French Rd, Suite 4, Buffalo 14228

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Review: We tried the Theragun Mini to massage our stress away – New York Post

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

NY Post may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

Are you feeling knotty?

First, please note the spelling. Then, if your tense back or sore muscles are screaming Yes!, keep reading.

While getting weekly or even monthly massages may be beneficial to both your physical and mental health, it can take a chunk out of your paychecks, too. Because of this, many of us deal with our aches and pains by ignoring them, instead of working through the knots with some massage and TLC.

Massage is generally considered part of integrative medicine, according to the Mayo Clinic. Its increasingly being offered along with standard treatment for a wide range of medical conditions and situations. Among the many benefits Mayo cites in relation to both stress and total body wellness:

Heres where an at-home massage device comes into play, providing much needed relief for your body without adding extra stress on your wallet. This is why we tested the Therabody Theragun Mini, the $199 personal and portable percussive therapy massage gun.

For those new to what percussive therapy is, youre not alone. To help explain it, we chatted with Dr. Jason Wersland, founder and chief wellness officer of Therabody, to break it all down.

Basically the up-and-down motion that the Theragun makes is called a percussive motion, he explained in a statement to The Post. That motion along with our specifically calibrated frequency and amplitude moves on and off the body having a positive effect on the body, nerves, and body tissue to ease muscle tension and aches.

The powerful-but-compact device comes with a carrying case so you can bring it pretty much anywhere, from the gym to use in the locker room after an intense workout to the office to use on a sore back due to bad posture or on your arches after wearing uncomfortable shoes. It also has a 150-minute battery life, should you leave your charger at home by accident.

We designed the mini specifically for ease-of-use. Its smaller in nature but doesnt sacrifice power. Its a pocket-sized device, giving Theragun quality muscle treatment with unparalleled portability, explained Dr. Wersland. The compact Theragun mini is the most agile massage device for on-the-go care, small enough to fit into a bag or laptop case, it can go anywhere with you.

The device is sold on Therabodys site in four different colors, including the white version I now have at home, a light taupe brown, black and red in partnership with (PRODUCT)RED, donating a portion of the proceeds between now and Dec. 31 to the Global Fund to support the COVID-19 Response as well as HIV/AIDS programs.

If this is your first foray into personal massage devices, no worries, as the Theragun Mini may be one of the easiest to use. If you need a bit more instruction than the video above or from the included care instructions in your box, they also have a library of training videos on the site that you can do from anywhere.

The device is a great supplement to getting a massage, as Dr. Wersland said that while this isnt a replacement for a trained massage therapist, there are still things you can do to mimic that relaxing experience.

Its a different experience, but if you are looking to replicate the spa experience, lay on your stomach and you can have another person do a full-body sweep from your shoulders to your feet, using Theragun slowly down your body, spending no more than two minutes on any muscle group, Dr. Wersland said.

Personally, even though from my age and lifestyle I should be in top notch shape, my genetics had other things in store for me. It seems like I was born with horrible knots in the four corners of my upper and lower back, and combined with my admittedly bad posture and poor stretching habits, I knew I was a great candidate for the Theragun Mini.

My favorite part was ease of use, as you can really use it anywhere on your body and anywhere you happen to be. I still work from home, so my main treatments happened on my couch or in my desk chair, but I also took it along in my overnight bag on a weekend trip and it was a lifesaver after the public transit ride there and back.

I also loved the three different speed settings, starting with the lowest setting at first but then amping up higher on tougher knots and lowering back down on more sensitive areas. Since youre supposed to treat the gun like an extension of your hand, it was fun to explore the best grip and speed for the treatments and figure out what worked the best for me.

Its a yes from me.

I would say that even after a few sessions using the Theragun Mini on my neck and the four corners of my back, I felt a release of tension. Even better, it seemed easier to have better posture once I was less tense, starting me on a cyclical journey for a more pain-free work day.

If you can afford massages or frequent chiropractor visits, investing the $199 in this is a no brainer to me. And if not, then its a perfect item to have on your holiday wishlist, so feel free to send along this article to your loved ones as a subtle hint before the holidays. Its sold on the Therabody site in four different colors, as well as on Amazon in red, black and white.

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5 Reasons to Add More Mushrooms to Your Life – The Beet

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

Unless youve been hiding under a rock (like our fungi friends) you know that mushrooms are the latest plant-based food to enjoy a resurgence in cooking. The main reason is that these are the original "food as medicine" ingredient, but for anyone who has watched Fantastic Fungi or was lucky enough to attend the first Fantastic Fungi Global Summit, you won't be able to stop talking about the benefits of mushrooms.

There is a reason that the current interest in and excitement about mushrooms is spreading fast. From using them in plant-based cooking, or taking medicinal mushrooms to boost the immune system, to enjoying their psychoactive compounds, it seems everyones gone mad for mushrooms.

The first-everFantastic Fungi Global Summit was held virtually, as a three-day event hosted by Fantastic Fungi filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg. Following the underground success of the film, he gathered more than 40 leading experts to expound on the benefits of mushrooms for the planet, health, and personal wellbeing. Here are the highlights. And if youre one of those people who wont eat mushrooms, this may change your mind and make you want to start including them for your health.

You might think this is bunk. In the primordial soup, we all know we came from fish, right? But one mind-blowing fact from the fascinating and visually beautiful film Fantastic Fungi(Netflix)is a stark realization of how fungi are key not only to our ecosystem but to our actual existenceas well. In the evolutionary tree, we humans divided from fungi about 650 million years ago and as animals, we branched out to process our nutrients in an internal sack (that eventually became the digestive system)while fungi chose to go underground to externally digest their nutrients, stabilizing carbon in the soil and contributing to the ecosystem. Humans are actually"related" to fungi, and also to mycelium, which is the network of fungal threads that are abundant under every footstep you take in the forest. This mycelium could be considered "the mother of us all," as the experts in the film commented.

Another fast fact to repeat at parties; The stoned ape hypothesis holds that fungi were a factor in tripling the size of the ape brain and helping sapiens develop skills such as language as we evolved into humans.

In the film, mycologist Paul Stamets talks about how fungi connect us not only with their ever-present underground network of mycelium (benefitting plants, animals, and humans), but in an evolutionary way, through the psychoactive properties of mushrooms. A core concept of evolution is that through natural selection the strongest and fittest survive," he explains. "But moreover, communities survive better than individuals, and thats the power of goodness evolution -- it is based on the concept of mutual benefit and the extension of generosity.

Mushrooms have adaptogenic properties, which means they can regulate and modulate the bodys stress response and this has further beneficial effects on many systems in the body. Studies show that mushrooms modulate the immune system and have many beneficial health effects including weight loss, brain and heart health, and even fighting cancer.

Mark Hyman, a doctor known for advocatingfunctional medicine, and author ofThe Pegan Diet and Food Fix,explained how foods such as mushrooms are medicine forthe body,and that we need to view food not just as calories and energy. The quality of the information in the food determines the quality of your health," Hyman told the summit attendees, and "if your food contains junky information like bad code, you will change your biological software in ways that are downgrading it, as opposed to upgrading your biological software by using food as medicine.

Hyman added that the power of food as medicine is such that it works faster, cheaper, and better than any drug ever invented and is available to everyone on the planet. Furthermore, he points out,healthy foodeaten in moderate quantities has no side effects.

Mushrooms contain a whole host of compounds, minerals, and nutrients, including polysaccharides and antioxidants that are good for the gut and help produce a healthy microbiome. According to studies, the fiberin mushroomsactsas prebiotics, stimulating good bacteria and improving gut health and overall health.

However, several experts at the summit warned that when we damage our ecosystem (through pollution and soil degradation) we alsodamage our own health, in particular our gut health.

The soil naturally contains trillions of microorganisms, including fungi that are beneficial to plant life and human health. Eating a plant-based diet provides our bodies withessential nutrients, but current agricultural methodstend to deplete the soil and contaminate plants with pesticides, as well as strip fruit and vegetables of their natural nutrients so that over time, even eating plant-based will have less benefit to human health. "Whatever we do to these things we do to ourselves Hyman points out.

Zach Bush MD agrees: The collapse of the ecosystem and soil quality is reflected in the collapse of the cell-to-cell communication in our bodies by beneficial bacteria, he points out.

On his website, he hosts a video that is encapsulated with this sentiment: "Weve built an entire economy around the concept of healthcare, and its failing us. Watch this video to learn more about chemical farming and the loss of human health.

At the summit, he explained that our bodies are already seeing the effects of our farming systems. Weve become separated," from the wholesome nutrients our bodies need to thrive, he explained at the summit, and "Weve sterilized ourselves." What he means by that: "Weve become disconnected [from beneficial natural food systems] and the ramifications are deep. The network we see in soil systems is failing within the human body, leading to an epidemic in chronic disease.

Dr. Andrew Weil, perhaps the best-known integrativemedicine advocate at the summit, explained that he had researched the medicinal properties of mushroomsback in the '70s, and continues to have a longstanding interest in the power of fungi. He explained thatmushrooms have always been undervalued by western medicine, yet highly valued in Eastern cultures and Chinese Medicine, which places them at the top of the list of superior natural products that are good for a wide array of conditions. He adds that ginseng is also in this category of a superfood as medicine.

Weil explained that it's simply irrational that Western societies have undervalued mushrooms for so long especially for their therapeutic potential and nutritional content. He added that mushrooms contain compounds that are not found elsewhere in nature, and theres a lot of toxicity in the mushroom world" which means that for treatment of diseases and conditions. "Theres really no difference between a drug and a poison except the dose," he explained, "so one way you find new drugs is to look at toxins and see if you can manipulate them and get them to low enough doses to make them useful.

Alot of the mushrooms used in China, Japan, and Korea are non-toxic polypores (a type of mushroom that grows in a shelf shape in forests) that can help modulate immune function and increase resistance to infection and cancer.

We dont have agents like that in Western medicine," Weil adds, "We know a lot of things that can harm immunity but we dont really have anything that can enhance immunity. He noted there are so many beneficial fungi including Reishi, Maitake, Shitake but the English-speaking world is myco-phobic fearing that mushrooms are worthless, poisonous, or dangerous and this mindset blocks scientists from looking to mushrooms for therapeutic effects, he adds, despite early research that compoundsin mushrooms can halt the growth of cancer cells in the lab.

Another obstacle is that Western medicine only recognizes medicines that work on one condition at a time, whereas mushrooms can work on a variety of systems. In Western medicine, if something is good for a lot of different conditions, we dont take interest in it, because we think that means it can't work by a specific biochemical mechanism," Weil said. "We like magic bullets that have a specific effect on a specific disease, in Chinese philosophy, those kinds of drugs are considered the least valuable in the inferior medicine category.

In the 1970s Nixon waged a war on drugs, which also stooped all research into the psychoactive potential of mushrooms. This got reversed in 1999 whenJohns Hopkins Medicineresearchers ignited newresearch intotherapy that includes psilocybin (the active compound in magic mushrooms).

Scientists have discovered that psilocybin is beneficial for reducing anxiety in some cancer patients and has the potential to treat a wide range of mood and substance disorders. Johns Hopkins researchers believe that we need to understand the potential benefits of magic mushrooms for patients who have disorders such as depression or anxiety, or other mental conditions. Micheal Pollan the author commented that because this is not a good business model, drug companies may not be interested in pursuing the studies.

The summit also included a discussion with Jonathan Levine, director of the popular series Nine Perfect Strangers whose theme was a spiritual retreat that included micro-dosing with hallucinogenics. Retreats involve patients who consent to the treatment (unlike the fictional series) and some have profound and enlightening experiences which can change their mental health for the better.Doctors acknowledge thismay not be suitable treatment for people with serious mental health issues, and the debate continues around ethics and legalization of psychedelics.

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New cancer treatment may reawaken the immune system – EurekAlert

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

CAMBRIDGE, MA -- Immunotherapy is a promising strategy to treat cancer by stimulating the bodys own immune system to destroy tumor cells, but it only works for a handful of cancers. MIT researchers have now discovered a new way to jump-start the immune system to attack tumors, which they hope could allow immunotherapy to be used against more types of cancer.

Their novel approach involves removing tumor cells from the body, treating them with chemotherapy drugs, and then placing them back in the tumor. When delivered along with drugs that activate T cells, these injured cancer cells appear to act as a distress signal that spurs the T cells into action.

When you create cells that have DNA damage but are not killed, under certain conditions those live, injured cells can send a signal that awakens the immune system, says Michael Yaffe, who is a David H. Koch Professor of Science, the director of the MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, and a member of MITs Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.

In mouse studies, the researchers found that this treatment could completely eliminate tumors in nearly half of the mice.

Yaffe and Darrell Irvine, who is the Underwood-Prescott Professor with appointments in MITs departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering, and an associate director of the Koch Institute, are the senior authors of the study, which appears today in Science Signaling. MIT postdoc Ganapathy Sriram and Lauren Milling PhD 21 are the lead authors of the paper.

T cell activation

One class of drugs currently used for cancer immunotherapy is checkpoint blockade inhibitors, which take the brakes off of T cells that have become exhausted and unable to attack tumors. These drugs have shown success in treating a few types of cancer but do not work against many others.

Yaffe and his colleagues set out to try to improve the performance of these drugs by combining them with cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs, in hopes that the chemotherapy could help stimulate the immune system to kill tumor cells. This approach is based on a phenomenon known as immunogenic cell death, in which dead or dying tumor cells send signals that attract the immune systems attention.

Several clinical trials combining chemotherapy and immunotherapy drugs are underway, but little is known so far about the best way to combine these two types of treatment.

The MIT team began by treating cancer cells with several different chemotherapy drugs, at different doses. Twenty-four hours after the treatment, the researchers added dendritic cells to each dish, followed 24 hours later by T cells. Then, they measured how well the T cells were able to kill the cancer cells. To their surprise, they found that most of the chemotherapy drugs didnt help very much. And those that did help appeared to work best at low doses that didnt kill many cells.

The researchers later realized why this was so: It wasnt dead tumor cells that were stimulating the immune system; instead, the critical factor was cells that were injured by chemotherapy but still alive.

This describes a new concept of immunogenic cell injury rather than immunogenic cell death for cancer treatment, Yaffe says. We showed that if you treated tumor cells in a dish, when you injected them back directly into the tumor and gave checkpoint blockade inhibitors, the live, injured cells were the ones that reawaken the immune system.

The drugs that appear to work best with this approach are drugs that cause DNA damage. The researchers found that when DNA damage occurs in tumor cells, it activates cellular pathways that respond to stress. These pathways send out distress signals that provoke T cells to leap into action and destroy not only those injured cells but any tumor cells nearby.

Our findings fit perfectly with the concept that danger signals within cells can talk to the immune system, a theory pioneered by Polly Matzinger at NIH in the 1990s, though still not universally accepted, Yaffe says.

Tumor elimination

In studies of mice with melanoma and breast tumors, the researchers showed that this treatment eliminated tumors completely in 40 percent of the mice. Furthermore, when the researchers injected cancer cells into these same mice several months later, their T cells recognized them and destroyed them before they could form new tumors.

The researchers also tried injecting DNA-damaging drugs directly into the tumors, instead of treating cells outside the body, but they found this was not effective because the chemotherapy drugs also harmed T cells and other immune cells near the tumor. Also, injecting the injured cells without checkpoint blockade inhibitors had little effect.

You have to present something that can act as an immunostimulant, but then you also have to release the preexisting block on the immune cells, Yaffe says.

Yaffe hopes to test this approach in patients whose tumors have not responded to immunotherapy, but more study is needed first to determine which drugs, and at which doses, would be most beneficial for different types of tumors. The researchers are also further investigating the details of exactly how the injured tumor cells stimulate such a strong T cell response.

###

The research was funded, in part, by the National Institutes of Health, the Mazumdar-Shaw International Oncology Fellowship, the MIT Center for Precision Cancer Medicine, and the Charles and Marjorie Holloway Foundation.

Science Signaling

Animals

The injury response to DNA damage in live tumor cells promotes antitumor immunity

19-Oct-2021

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Meet the speakers who will welcome President Paul Alivisatos during inauguration – UChicago News

Tuesday, October 26th, 2021

For nearly a century, presidential inaugurations have served as opportunities for the UChicago community to come together and rededicate itself to the University's founding values, while also charting new directions.

For the inauguration of President Paul Alivisatos on Oct. 29, speakers will offer welcome remarks on behalf of UChicago faculty, staff, students, alumni and the local communityhighlighting the Universitys many facets and its interconnectedness with the South Side of Chicago.

Learn more about the people who will speak at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel below:

Eve L. Ewing is an assistant professor in the Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy and Practice. She is a sociologist of education whose work has focused on the impact of racism and social inequality in K12 public school systems, and how school communities can help interrupt and dismantle such problems.

Ewing is the author of Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings on Chicagos South Side. An examination of the 2013 mass closings of Chicago Public Schools, the book received the 2020 Laing Award, the top honor given annually by the University of Chicago Press.

Ewing, AB08,has written two poetry collections, Electric Arches and 1919, as well as the Marvel comic series Ironheart. Her work has also been published by major news organizations, including the New York Times and The Atlantic. Her latest book is Maya and the Robot, a novel for young readers.

Vish Venkataraman is a fifth-year Ph.D. student in integrative biology. He studies the evolution and development of sensory systems and their relationship to the evolutionary morphology of vertebrates; in the lab, he studies the development of zebrafish and skates from embryos and combines this with information from the fossil record of early vertebrates. He has a long-standing interest in the relationship between science and philosophy, as well as in South Asian languages and literature, particularly Tamil and Sanskrit.

As the speaker representing students, he said, his remarks will carry the theme of listening. A university is like a symphony, composed of thousands of voicessome harmonious, some dissonantand the universitys intellectual life is the net result of all of these voices, he said. All symphonies need a listener; the role of the president is to listen and uplift and add his own voice to the symphony.

Venkataraman received his undergraduate degree in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, and his M.Sc. in paleobiology at the University of Bristol.

This past September, Jennifer Kennedy, AB02, marked 19 years as a University staff member. She began her career working as an undergraduate financial assistant at the Reynolds Club, and has served as the inaugural director of the UChicago Student Centers since 2018.

Kennedy oversees several centers for student life, including the Reynolds Club, Mandel Hall, Ida Noyes Hall, four student-run coffee shops and the Pub. Through her various duties, she helps students and RSOs think creatively about how to create a sense of community and belonging on campus.

While Im usually more comfortable supporting events from behind the scenes, Im proud to represent the staff at UChicago at this historic event, Kennedy said. Staff make up a large portion of the UChicago community and are a talented and dedicated group. Over the past 20 months alone, the collaboration and creativity of the staff at UChicago has been key to our success as an institution, and Im proud to be given the chance to highlight their good work.

Margaret Mueller, AM97, is the president and chief executive officer of the Executives Club of Chicago, and the president of the University of Chicago Alumni Board. She considers herself a social scientist at heartsomething shaped by the intellectual home she found at UChicago.

I am honored to represent the alumni community on this momentous occasion as we welcome fellow alum, President Alivisatos, as our next president, Mueller said. We could not envision anyone better suited to lead the University at this pivotal moment in time and into the future. His humanist perspective, brilliant scientific mind and varied world experience will serve the University community well.

A graduate of the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences, Mueller credits her MAPSS education for guiding her academic and professional journey. As president and CEO, she drives the strategic vision and execution of how the Executives Club of Chicago delivers on its mission of connecting, developing and growing the Chicago regions business leaders.

Mueller has taught and advised students at the Booth School of Business, is a frequent judge in the New Venture Challenge, and remains engaged with MAPSS and the University overall in many other capacities.

Rev. Julian DeShazier is the senior pastor at the University Church of Chicago, located just steps from the UChicago campus. For more than a decade, he has sought to make the church an instrumental part of the communitys most important conversations.

In 2017, Crains Chicago Business named DeShazier to its 40 under 40 listrecognizing his advocacy for the opening of a South Side trauma center, and his role on the University of Chicago Medicines community advisory council.

This occasion is more than ornamental; it is a precious opportunity for us to transition, in various ways, and Im honored to share with and on behalf of the wider community, said DeShazier, a Chicago native and a 2010 graduate of the University of Chicago Divinity School.

DeShazier is also an accomplished musician. Performing as the rapper J.Kwest, he contributed to a short film inspired by Billie Holidays Strange Fruit. The video, which shared its title with the 1939 song, won a 2015 Lower Great Lakes Emmy Award.

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Three ayurvedic concoctions get scientific validation for treating rheumatoid arthritis – Free Press Journal

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

She said the study was conducted in four phases in rats after inducing rheumatoid arthritis and the treatment duration was based on standard protocol. "Severity of pain and inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis were decided by the infiltration of so many pro-inflammatory cytokines, lymphocytes, oxidants etc. By this study we were able to find that kashayams exerted therapeutic efficacy in the management of rheumatoid arthritis by regulating pro anti-inflammatory cytokines balance, increasing antioxidant level and by immune modulation," said Aswathy.

The study team that was guided by A. Helen, Professor and Mentor, has published their work in the international peer reviewed Journal of Ayurveda and integrative medicine and two papers are under review. The highlight of the study is that while all these three kashayams are available in the market there was no scientific validation, which the study team has been able to do.

The team instead of relying on the readily available kashayams, decided to make their own under the guidance of Ayurveda physician Sukumara Varier of Kottakal Arya Vaidyasala. The team prepared the decoction from 28 different forms of herbs and the major difference was they did not add any substance, which is added to increase the shelf life.

With regard to the outcome, Aswathy said "our attempt was to give better hope to patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis besides a vehicle to enrich traditional knowledge with well documented scientific background for the sake of mankind."

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COVID Long-Haulers Find Relief Among Fellow Sufferers on Road to Recovery – WCCO | CBS Minnesota

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) Around California and the Bay Area youll find them: members of a club that no one wants to join. These are patients who experience lingering misery after they no longer test positive for SARS-CoV-2. Theyre known as the long-haulers.

About 10 percent of patients whove had an initial COVID-19 infection will go on to not fully recover, said UCSF neurologist Dr. Juliet Morgan.

It puzzled a lot of us, said Dr. Meghan Jobson, palliative care Fellow at UCSF.

KPIX met two long-haulers: retired former banker Bruce Wheeler and Carla, who is a first responder. Carla asked us not to use her last name.

It felt very lonely and, after a while, you wonder: is this in my head? Wheeler said.

When Carla first noticed the symptoms of her long-haul syndrome, she was worried.

I dont think Im going to be OK, she remembered thinking.

Both were infected last year and felt awful. The infections went away but their brush with the novel coronavirus was far from over. For months, they continue to suffer baffling, debilitating health conditions.

I know what its like to be really tired but this was different, explained Carla.

Carla used to bicycle hundreds of miles and run marathons. Today, she feels extraordinary fatigue, shortness of breath and a terrible, systemic pain.

You know when you cut yourself and you put alcohol in there and you know it burns? she asked. It was similar to that but all over.

Wheeler was an active hiker but he now reports fatigue, persistent shortness of breath, nausea, brain fog and destabilizing headaches.

Many days I get up at 8 oclock in the morning and, at 10 oclock, Im back in bed because my headache is pounding away, he said.

The symptoms for long-haul syndrome vary but can also include a loss of the sense of smell and taste, as well as hair loss.

Theres also a report of patients developing serious inflammatory conditions. Preliminary data indicate that some asymptomatic college athletes developed an inflammatory heart condition.

Whats frustrating is that the syndrome is not well understood. Family, friends, co-workers and colleague often express disbelief at the constellation of symptoms, questioning if the patient is actually sick. Often, patients are mistakenly prescribed anti-anxiety medicine, even anti-depressants.

There just werent answers, Wheeler said.

I felt hopeless, said Carla.

Their situation reached the attention of Dr. Morgan and Dr. Jobson. They both specialize in chronic conditions that impact quality of life and they have expertise in integrative medicine.

What we had been hearing from multiple survivors of COVID-19 is that they didnt feel heard, explained Dr. Jobson.

The cause for the syndrome remains unclear although it may involve an overreactive immune or inflammatory response. And, while older people appear more likely to get it, young people are not immune.

We will see plenty of very young patients in their twenties and thirties who have this COVID long-haul syndrome who continue to suffer, Dr. Morgan said.

The doctors established an online COVID support group: the first of its kind in the nation. Meetings are packed.

There is strength in survivorship, explained Dr. Jobson.

During group sessions, patients share their stories. The doctors answer questions, address fringe treatments and provide expertise in how to manage symptoms.

Shortness of breath, the fatigue we know a lot of the data and literature surrounding these things, Dr. Jobson said.

Instruction is given in ways to relax such as mindfulness and meditation.

Mindfulness is actually pretty powerful and potent medicine. We know in studies that it can reduce markers of stress like cortisol. It can reduce inflammatory markers like IL-6. Dr. Morgan explained.

Bruce Wheeler and Carla told KPIX the online support and help has already provided a great benefit.

Literally in the last two weeks, I began to see improvement on the headache front, Wheeler said.

Instead of doing it every once in a while, now I do it every day, every night, Carla added.

They also learn from each other what strategies work, what doesnt and theyve been inspired by others.

I am really impressed by Carlas strength and that she saw the silver lining even when it was a really bad, bad day, Bruce commented.

Carla did lose her hair. When Bruce saw her online, Carla recounted how he said just the right thing.

He took it upon himself to say You know what Carla, it actually looks pretty good on you, she smiled.

As for the doctors, theyve learned quite a lot from their patients: curiosity, resilience, respect and tenacity.

Theyre showing us what it looks like to ask for help, Dr. Morgan said.

We encourage other people in other areas of the country to start support groups, Dr. Jobson added.

There are other extraordinary COVID long-haul syndrome support groups, such as Survivor Corps and Body Politic.

The UCSF group was so successful and helpful to the long-haulers involved, they asked Dr. Jobson and Dr. Morgan to extend it. Now a new one is set to begin this spring. There is no cost to patients.

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Health Coaching Market Increasing Demand with New Technologies by 2027 ExpertRating, Duke Integrative Medicine, National Society of Health Coaches,…

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

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Tuning the circadian clock, boosting rhythms may be key to future treatments and medicines – Newswise

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Newswise Irvine, CA February 11, 2021 Subconsciously, our bodies keep time for us through an ancient means the circadian clock. A new University of California, Irvine-led article reviews how the clock controls various aspects of homeostasis, and how organs coordinate their function over the course of a day.

What is fascinating is that nearly every cell that makes up our organs has its own clock, and thus timing is a crucial aspect of biology, said Kevin B. Koronowski, PhD, lead author and a postdoctoral fellow in Biological Chemistry at the UCI School of Medicine. Understanding how daily timing is integrated with function across organs has implications for human health, as disruption of the clock and circadian rhythms can be both a cause and effect of diseases from diabetes to cancer.

The circadian clock generates a ~24 hour rhythm that controls behavior, hormones, the immune system and metabolism. Using human cells and mice, researchers from the Paolo Sassone-Corsi Laboratory at UCI's Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism aim to uncover the physiological circuits, for example between the brain and liver, whereby biological clocks achieve coherence. Their work, titled, Communicating clocks shape circadian homeostasis, was published today in Science.

Circadian clocks align internal processes with external time, which enables diverse lifeforms to anticipate daily environmental changes such as the light-dark cycle. In complex organisms, clock function starts with the genetically encoded molecular clock or oscillator within each cell and builds upward anatomically into an organism-wide system. Circadian misalignment, often imposed in modern society, can disrupt this system and induce adverse effects on health if prolonged.

Strategies to tune our clocks and boost rhythms have been promising in pre-clinical studies, which illustrates the importance of unraveling this aspect of our biology and unlocking the potential it holds for treatments and medicines of the future, said Koronowski.

Without electrical light, high-speed travel, constant food availability and around the clock work-life schedules, our ancestors clocks were in constant harmony with the environment. However, due to these pressures of modern society, aligning our internal time with geophysical time has become a challenge in todays world. Chronic misalignment when eating and sleeping patterns conflict with the natural light-dark cycle is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, neurological conditions, and cancer. A large portion of the global workforce has atypical hours and may be particularly vulnerable.

It has become urgent that we uncover the molecular underpinnings of the relationship between the circadian clock and disease, explained Koronowski. Deciphering the means by which clocks communicate across metabolic organs has the potential to transform our understanding of metabolism, and it may hold therapeutic promise for innovative, noninvasive strategies to promote health.

This work is dedicated to the memory of Paolo Sassone-Corsi (19562020), a great scientist, mentor, and human. It was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, Novo Nordisk Foundation and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

About the UCI School of Medicine

Each year, the UCI School of Medicine educates more than 400 medical students, and nearly 150 doctoral and masters students. More than 700 residents and fellows are trained at UCI Medical Center and affiliated institutions. The School of Medicine offers an MD; a dual MD/PhD medical scientist training program; and PhDs and masters degrees in anatomy and neurobiology, biomedical sciences, genetic counseling, epidemiology, environmental health sciences, pathology, pharmacology, physiology and biophysics, and translational sciences. Medical students also may pursue an MD/MBA, an MD/masters in public health, or an MD/masters degree through one of three mission-based programs: the Health Education to Advance Leaders in Integrative Medicine (HEAL-IM), the Leadership Education to Advance Diversity-African, Black and Caribbean (LEAD-ABC), and the Program in Medical Education for the Latino Community (PRIME-LC). The UCI School of Medicine is accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Accreditation and ranks among the top 50 nationwide for research. For more information, visit som.uci.edu.

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Apprenticeships are the catalyst for opportunity – Crain’s Chicago Business

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

To build a diverse workforce that reflects the country and matches emerging employer needs, we must increase efforts to support students from high school through college with targeted training, on-the-job paid work experience, individualized supports, and career counseling.

Baker's experience highlights a key ingredient: "What really made it work for me was that everyone was committed to one common goal in creating a pathway for success."

Obtaining a four-year college degree is not essential for all students. In Illinois, 52 percent of jobs require education and training beyond high school, but not a B.A. degree. These high-demand fields include health care, medical technology and advanced manufacturing.

At One Million Degrees, our focus is on providing a range of supports to Chicago-area community college students and serving as a connector to employers. Across the state, 60 percent of public college students attend community colleges. Many, like Baker, are the first in their family to attend college and are working full-time jobs and supporting their families.

We are seeing employers across industries partner with educators and students to build on-ramps to in-demand jobs, especially through new apprenticeship programs. There's growing recognition that these programs can help address long-standing underrepresentation in lucrative fields among Blacks, Latinx and women, by providing both access and wraparound support.

Those supports, from stipends and transportation vouchers to child care and counseling must be aligned with the specific needs of each student. "Each individual is unique and needs different supports," says Baker, who found personal contacts for emotional support especially useful over the past year.

Chicago and the state of Illinois are leading the way. MAPP is but one of several new promising programs. Supported by health care providers Rush University Medical Center, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, NorthShore University HealthSystem, University of Chicago Medicine and Sinai Health System, plus West Side United, One Million Degrees and Malcolm X College, the program is designed to help students advance their careers in the health care sector.

The Chicago Apprenticeship Network has become a national model, with one of its founders, Aon, taking the program to six new cities. The strength of the Chicago program is its array of partners40 companies across 16 industries, City Colleges of Chicago and One Million Degreesas it plans to develop 1,000 apprenticeships.

One Million Degrees is also providing mentors to support Career Launch Chicago, an effort by the city of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools and City Colleges to provide high school students entering college with paid work experiences.

Research from the University of Chicago Inclusive Economy Lab on the impact of our support program for community college students shows increases in college enrollment, full-time enrollment and persistence. Our own analysis shows that our support of college apprentices contributes to high retention rates: 98 percent in our collaboration with Aon and 94 percent with MAPP.

We should be encouraged by the momentum around combining training and education opportunities. The state of Illinois is investing in apprenticeships across the state. President Joe Biden pledged during his campaign to make a $50 billion investment in workforce training, including community college business partnerships and apprenticeships.

Apprenticeships can be a bipartisan way of directing increased education and training support to closing skills gaps and should focus on expanding beyond the trades, where they are now concentrated, according to a new report from Brookings.

As Baker tells us, apprenticeships are the catalyst for opportunity. "For years, I kept telling myself that next semester I'd go back to school. MAPP opened the door for me to pursue my dream."

Paige Ponder is chief executive officer of One Million Degrees, a nonprofit providing support to community college students to help them succeed.

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