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Archive for the ‘Veterinary Medicine’ Category

New Veterinary Hospital Gets New Name Thanks to Generosity of PVM Alumnus and His Wife – Purdue Veterinary News

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Friday, February 12, 2021

As the date for opening the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicines new hospital facilities draws closer, the Purdue Board of Trustees has approved a new name for the complex in recognition of a $10 million leadership commitment from PVM alumnus David Brunner and his wife, Bonnie. The board took the action at its meeting Friday, February 5, honoring the Brunners for their gift that will be meaningful to students, staff, faculty, clients, and alumni alike for years ahead.

Encompassing 162,500 square feet, the new veterinary hospital facilities will be known as the David and Bonnie Brunner Purdue Veterinary Medical Hospital Complex, and will include three components located just east of the existing Lynn Hall of Veterinary Medicine:

As the pandemic has underscored, a state-of-the-art veterinary medicine program now not only benefits our animal population, but is an integral element in protecting human health, said Purdue President Mitch Daniels. Thanks to David and Bonnie, Indiana and the nation will now have such an invaluable asset.

Dr. Brunner earned his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree at Purdue in 1979, and then began his career as a practitioner in what he calls the most enjoyable profession in the world. I go to work and play with puppies and kittens. He credits his time as a student at Purdue for fueling his passion.

Dr. Brunner is the owner of the Broad Ripple Animal Clinic (BRAC), a business he founded on the north side of Indianapolis in 1981 with one employee. BRAC now has nine full-time veterinarians and is one of the 15% of hospitals in the U.S. accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. Dr. Brunner retired as a practicing clinical veterinarian in 2012 but continues to be involved with the clinic as chief visionary and staff cheerleader.

Dr. Brunner has been a member of the Indiana Veterinary Medical Association, the American Veterinary Medical Association, and the American Animal Hospital Association. He is a past president of the Indianapolis Humane Society, having previously served on the board for ten years. In addition, Dr. Brunner has authored two books, The Dog Owners Manual and The Cat Owners Manual, currently published in 12 languages worldwide.

Bonnie (MacLeod) Brunner holds degrees in economics and comparative politics and an MBA in finance from UCLA. She retired from trading at Morgan Stanley and owns Lupo Design & Build, a luxury contemporary residential home building company in Hermosa Beach, Calif. She balances this business with her role as chief financial officer of the veterinary practice and managing the couples personal and commercial properties. Bonnie was actively involved in animal rescue organizations in Los Angeles before meeting David. The Brunners split their time between Indianapolis; Southern California; and St. Barths, French West Indies.

My years at Purdue were life-changing, Dr. Brunner said. It took me a while to appreciate the incredible education I received from Purdues vet school. To this day, I reflect with sincere appreciation on the many professors and clinical instructors who helped shape me into the veterinarian I became.

Bonnie and I have been presented with an extraordinary opportunity to contribute to the construction of the new veterinary medical complex. It is our hope that this contribution will aid and inspire veterinary students, now and for years to come. I am passionate about companion animal practice and have a special interest in inspiring the entrepreneurial spirit in veterinary students and teaching them the art of veterinary practice and the business of veterinary medicine.

The couple is looking forward to having an active role in the Purdue Alumni Association and to finally attending some Boilermaker football games, as they joke, We did not have time to do things like that when we were in school because we were always studying.

The design of the new David and Bonnie Brunner Purdue Veterinary Medical Hospital Complex optimizes hands-on learning for students and creates dedicated space for community engagement opportunities. In addition, the complexs larger footprint and updated equipment will increase clinical research and allow faculty researchers to respond to more clinical trial opportunities, thus expanding the College of Veterinary Medicines reputation as a world-renowned research institute.

Due to the generosity of David and Bonnie Brunner, our vision of constructing a true state-of-the-art hospital is becoming a reality, said Purdue Veterinary Medicine Dean Willie Reed. The new hospital will provide a wonderful learning environment for our students, enable our faculty to advance their clinical research programs that involve clinical trials and greatly enhance our capability to deliver the highest quality care to our animal patients. I am especially grateful to have an alumnus of the college and his wife make such an impactful contribution to the colleges future success.

Slated to be completed by December and open by spring 2022, the new complex will provide for the varied needs of clients while also maximizing efficiency. For the first time, horses will have their own equine hospital rather than being treated at the same facility as farm animals like cows, pigs, and sheep, which will be attended to at the new farm animal hospital. Efficiencies in the existing hospital facility also will be incorporated into the new structures. For example, expensive imaging technology will be located centrally so it can be accessed from both the small animal and equine hospitals, which mirrors current practice in the existing facilities.

Some small animal services will remain at the current small animal hospital. In addition to treating animals, the hospital complex will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research, including cancer drug discovery and the development of treatments for paralysis.

The total cost of the project is $108 million. Purdue has committed $35 million, which includes ongoing fundraising by the College of Veterinary Medicine, and the state of Indiana approved a $73 million appropriation.

Writer(s): Purdue News Service and Kevin Doerr | pvmnews@purdue.edu

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Bovine production-medicine expert joins TTU School of Veterinary Medicine Faculty – KLBK | KAMC | EverythingLubbock.com

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

AMARILO and LUBBOCK, Texas (NEWS RELEASE) The following is a news release from Texas Tech University:

Community, integrity, kindheartedness, grit, inspiration. These are the values that embody the purpose and vision of theTexas Tech School of Veterinary Medicine in Amarillo. Theyre among the characteristics that make West Texas what it is today.

Those also are values that veterinarian Pedro Melendez shares and holds deeply. As a worldwide expert in beef and dairy cattle production medicine and nutrition, Melendez has spent the last 30 years imparting his wisdom and knowledge to veterinarians and veterinary students around the globe. Now, he will bring that experience, wisdom and knowledge to Texas.

Melendez is the newest faculty member of the Texas Tech School of Veterinary Medicine, joining a diverse collection of experts as an associate professor. He began his duties on Monday (Feb. 8).

I am very excited to begin my academic adventure at Texas Tech, Melendez said. Like any new veterinary school, the challenge is huge, but at the same time rewarding, because it will give me the opportunity to leave a legacy that can be remembered forever. In this sense, I am committed to thoroughly following the core values of Texas Tech, not because it is an obligation but because it is my lifestyle. These are the values that I inherited from my parents, and I will put them into practice day by day with the students, my colleagues, the staff and the entire community with which I will live.

Melendez comes to Texas Tech after spending the last three years as a clinical associate professor at the University of Georgia where he taught courses in population health, discussing published veterinary research and new research developments as well as management approaches and current issues in the diagnosis of disease and health maintenance on domestic and wild animal populations.

While at Georgia he also served in a graduate appointment in animal and dairy sciences at the universitys College of Veterinary Medicine as well as a graduate appointment in animal sciences at Colorado State University.

Prior to his time in Georgia, Melendez served on the faculty at the University of Missouri in Columbia, focusing on dairy production and food animal medicine. Dairy production medicine and cattle nutrition have also been his focus in teaching stops at the University of Florida and the University Santo Tomas in Chile.

I hope I can bring new ideas to Texas Tech that can help me interact positively with everybody, because I have a gregarious personality, Melendez said, Teamwork is my slogan, and I am sure it is the spirit of all at Texas Tech.

His goal at Texas Tech is to connect with the practitioners as well as owners and managers of local dairies to help teach students and collaborate on applied research. Melendez also hopes to establish a service laboratory for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases, metabolic profiling and nutritional monitoring to support the labor of bovine practitioners and nutritionists.

An important component of our mission is to support the sustainability our nations livestock industries, saidGuy Loneragan, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine. Animal agriculture has been at the heart of Texas since its inception. The two are interwoven in the fabric of what and who we are. Animal agriculture helps drive the states economy, and the School of Veterinary Medicine is located at the epicenter of this industry. The insights and expertise Dr. Melendez brings adds to the vibrancy of our school and the region. He also brings a worldview that makes us all better.

Melendez is a member of the American Board of Veterinary Medicine, the American Veterinary Medical Association, the American Association of Bovine Practitioners and the American Dairy Science Association.

He earned his bachelors degree in veterinary science and his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Chile, and his masters and doctoral degrees in veterinary science from the University of Florida. He also served his residency in food animal reproduction and medicine from Florida. He earned his board certification in dairy practice from the American Board of Veterinary Practitioners in 2019 and served seven years in general bovine medical practice upon earning his veterinary degree in 1990.

Dr. Melendez brings a national and international background in dairy production medicine to our school, saidJohn Dascanio, senior associate dean for academic and student affairs. He has years of experience and a passion to help the dairy industry. He is not only committed to helping the region but also will incorporate international continuing education and engagement. I look forward to his work with our dairy community, with it being one of the largest milksheds in the country.

Thanks to the generosity of Amarillo and communities across Texas, and the commitment of legislators from around the state, the Texas Tech University School of Veterinary Medicine in Amarillo was established in 2018. In September 2020, the school was granted a Letter of Reasonable Assurance, from the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) Council on Education and has begun the admissions process in preparation for classes to begin in August.

The School of Veterinary Medicine will recruit and select students with a passion to serve rural and regional communities. Its curriculum is focused on the competencies and skills necessary for success in practice types that support these communities. Texas Techs innovative and cost-efficient model partners with the wider community of veterinary practices across the state to provide clinical, real-world experiential learning.

(News release from Texas Tech University)

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Bovine production-medicine expert joins Texas Tech University School of Veterinary Medicine faculty – KAMR – MyHighPlains.com

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

by: Roushell Hamilton Jr.

via Texas Tech

AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR/KCIT) Texas Tech University named Pedro Melendez the newest faculty member of the Texas Tech School of Veterinary Medicine. Melendez has 30 years of experience in beef and dairy cattle production, medicine, and nutrition.

Melendez spent the last three years as a clinical associate professor at the University of Georgia where he taught courses in population health, veterinary research and health maintenance of domestic and wild animal populations, Texas Tech said.

I am very excited to begin my academic adventure at Texas Tech, Melendez said. Like any new veterinary school, the challenge is huge, but at the same time rewarding, because it will give me the opportunity to leave a legacy that can be remembered forever. In this sense, I am committed to thoroughly following the core values of Texas Tech, not because it is an obligation but because it is my lifestyle.

Melendez said his goal is to establish a lab for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases, metabolic profiling and nutritional monitoring to support bovine practitioners and nutritionists.

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Animal Science and Engineering Researchers Partner to Improve Veterinary Procedure – University of Arkansas Newswire

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Photo Submitted

Top from left, students Davina D'Angelo and Sam Stephens; bottom, professors Morten Jensen and Lauren Thomas.

An interdisciplinary team of University of Arkansas researchers has come together to develop a surgical spoon that is currently in clinical testing to make a common veterinary procedure safer and more effective.

Faculty and students from the Dale Bumpers College of Agriculture, Food and Life Sciences are working alongside researchers in the College of Engineering to develop a novel spoon that will allow veterinarians to more effectively remove bladder stones from companion animals a common procedure in the veterinary industry.

The collaboration includes Lauren Thomas, a doctor of veterinary medicine and clinical assistant professor of animal science;Davina D'Angelo, her student;Morten Jensen, associate professor of biomedical engineering;and Sam Stephens, a research engineer and graduate student in Jensen's lab.

The project combines the expertise and experience of Thomas and D'Angelo in veterinary medicine with Jensen and Stephens' expertise in medical device design and manufacturing. The team created a series of 3-D printed spoons that are currently in clinical testing by local veterinary clinics to better remove bladder stones in animals. The spoons were optimized with computational simulations and mechanical testing and the team is currently evaluating feedback from the clinics.

D'Angelo, an honors student who is in the final year of her studies, approached Thomas about the idea as a sophomore after spending a number of hours shadowing at a local veterinary hospital and observing a number of cystotomy surgeries. Thomas then contacted Jensen to add engineering design expertise to the team.

"For many local veterinarians, the methods available for stone extraction are often limited to the use of a traditional tablespoon, teaspoon, or flushing the stones out by inserting a urinary catheter through the urinary tract," D'Angelo said. "Many times, these methods still make it difficult to remove all of the stones, especially the small ones that can be down to a few millimeters in size."

Left-behind stones can cause a variety of issues in animals, including infections and recurrence of future stones.

Thomas said the research addresses a real-world need for veterinarians.

"Bladder stones are a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that can affect a variety of domestic animal species," she said. "There are a few different methods for removal of the stones, but depending on the type of animal we are dealing with, as well as the location and nature of the stone, it can be difficult to remove all of them safely. These spoons will give veterinarians a customized tool that has been made with veterinary patient safety, stone removal efficacy and anesthetic efficiency in mind. If we can decrease the amount of time that veterinary surgeons spend performing this procedure, that decreases the amount of time the animal spends under anesthesia, which is safer for the animal, saves the client money, and improves the odds of getting all of the unwanted stones out of the urinary bladder.It's a win on all fronts."

Jensen said the project was an excellent opportunity for creating a fruitful interdisciplinary collaboration. "We have used our experience in working withclinicianson device design, simulation, prototyping and testingto extend that to participate in this unique partnership betweenfaculty andstudents of the two colleges."

D'Angelo, credited her mentors at Faithful Friends Animal Clinic in Rogers, and said the entire experience helped her take a big step toward her goals.

"I am thankful for the faculty at the University of Arkansas for their eagerness to collaborate and forge innovation in the name of veterinary medicine," she said. "I have been afforded exposure to biomedical engineering and laboratory skills that will propel me through my educational journey of becoming a veterinarian. My aspiration is to create an impact in the standard of health care for our companion animals."

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Animal Science and Engineering Researchers Partner to Improve Veterinary Procedure - University of Arkansas Newswire

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Brushing your dog’s teeth helps with overall health – Chicago Daily Herald

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

February is Dental Health Care Month. That applies to both dogs and humans.

My first experience with veterinary dentistry was 20 about years ago. Other than learning that brushing our dog's teeth was important, our dogs never had dental problems. Then Bourbon, our Doberman/German shepherd mix, snatched a frozen homemade dog cookie from the table where it was defrosting and broke a tooth.

Bourbon didn't need a root canal, but in an attempt to save the tooth, our veterinarian suggested looking into a crown for it. At that time, the availability of veterinary specialty dental practices was limited in our area, so we traveled a distance to find one.

According to the University of California, Davis, School of Veterinary Medicine, there was an upsurge in veterinary dentistry in the 1980s. .

In addition to fractured or broken teeth, dogs (and cats) can have a variety of dental problems. The American Veterinary Dental Society reports more than 80% of dogs and 70% of cats develop some signs of gum disease by age 3.

The Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and the American Veterinary Dental Society describe periodontal disease and its warning signs.

Periodontal disease may have a serious affect on a pet's health. In addition to receding gums, loosening and eventual loss of teeth, studies have shown the kidneys, liver and even the heart can be affected.

Gum disease is an infection and inflammation of the gums caused by bacteria present in plaque and tartar. The problem begins when plaque and tartar build up on the pet's teeth, especially below the gum line.

The warning signs of gum disease include bad breath, a yellow brown crust of tartar around the gum line, pain or bleeding when the pet eats or when you touch his teeth.

The American Veterinary Dental Society recommends prevention as the key to helping pets maintain good oral health. They recommend three steps:

Visit your veterinarian. A veterinarian will conduct a physical examination as part of the dental examination.

Start a dental care routine at home. The dental health of your dog starts with regular brushing. Ideally, you should start when they are young, between 8-12 weeks. But it is never too late to start.

Petmaster.com suggests instructions on how to gently and effectively brush your dog's teeth:

To introduce the process, dip your hands in peanut butter or something your dog loves to eat and allow him to lick it off your fingers. As he does this, slowly and gently rub your finger along his teeth and gums. After several days of practice, teach him to open his mouth using treats as rewards.

Use a dog toothbrush and dog toothpaste. Human toothpaste contains fluoride, which is toxic to dogs.

Scratch you dog's muzzle and gently pet him while lifting his lip for about 30 seconds. Then, as you do the above, gently rub your fingers through his teeth for 20-30 seconds.

Put a small amount of dog-friendly toothpaste on a toothbrush, allowing your dog to lick it off. (I have found I could encourage my dog by first having him lick the toothpaste off my finger and then have him lick it off the toothbrush.) This step allows your dog to get used to the taste. If he doesn't seem to like it, try another flavor.

Now you can start brushing. The outer surface of the dog's teeth is the most important, so brush each side for 20-30 seconds. Remember, this is a new experience for your dog, so take it slow and be gentle. If your dog is resistant, stop ad try again another day. It may take several weeks for your dog to get used to having his teeth brushed.

Brush your dog's teeth when he is tired, after a lengthy walk or a playtime session.

If a toothbrush isn't working, you may want to use dental wipes or a dog finger toothbrush. If at any time your dog shows signs of discomfort or aggression, stop brushing immediately. He may be uncomfortable, fearful or in pain.

For information, you can download the e-book "Tooth Brushing Basics" from the American Kennel Club, or go to webmed.com and/or other sites that offer video demonstrations.

The third step the American Veterinary Dental Society recommends is to get regular veterinary dental checkups. Your veterinarian needs to monitor the progress of your pet's preventive dental care routine much the same way a dentist monitors your dental health.

Oral health is important to the health of our dogs. They depend on us to do it right.

The Buddy Foundation, 65 W. Seegers Road, Arlington Heights, is a nonprofit 501(c) 3 shelter. Call (847) 290-5806 or visit http://www.thebuddyfoundation.org.

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ZooMontana’s wolf Simpson diagnosed with rare condition, to be sent out of state for surgery – KTVQ Billings News

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

(ZooMontana Press Release)

BILLINGS - During the late summer of 2020, ZooMontana took in a young, abandoned, 7-week-old Grey Wolf pup. The wolf was found, fed, and briefly housed by families in Condon MT, and then turned over to Montanas Fish, Wildlife and Parks in Kalispell.

After unsuccessful attempts to relocate the pups pack, the wolf was transferred to ZooMontana, and aptly named Simpson. During his first few months at the Zoo, officials say he was doing great, with a few oddities attributed to puppyhood. However, as he grew older, his clumsiness and poor eyesight led caregivers to believe something more was going on. After an altercation with one of the Zoos adult wolves, his condition deteriorated significantly, ultimately leading the Zoos veterinarian team to take him in for a CT scan of his brain. The scan unfortunately showed some bad news; Simpson has Congenital Hydrocephalus.

RELATED: ZooMontana welcomes orphaned wolf pup

This condition causes an increased production of cerebrospinal fluid, or "water on the brain", that increases intracranial pressure, said Dr. Haynes Werner, one of the Zoos lead veterinarians. In Simpson's case, his condition is likely to worsen as he gets older, and while he is currently on several medications, long term medical management is not his best option. We got to work to find solutions, and rested on surgery as his best option, Werner added.

Being this is a unique, highly specialized case, ZooMontanas veterinary team contacted specialists in the field to tackle the delicate surgery. After an exhaustive search, Washington State Universitys College of Veterinary Medicine agreed to take on the case. Simpson will travel with his local veterinary team to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital in March to have a shunt placed in his brain to drain the excess fluid and relieve pressure on his brain. ZooMontana Executive Director, Jeff Ewelt, said that everyone agrees that this surgery is the best option available to Simpson, but wants everyone to know that there are many risks are involved.

RELATED: Orphaned wolf pup at ZooMontana adjusting to his new home

The Zoo stated that surgery is expected to cost about $10,000, with another $10,000 in expected habitat changes to make the Simpsons life more comfortable. ZooMontana has setup up a donation link on their website, http://www.zoomontana.org/support-simpson [zoomontana.org], if you would like to help contribute to Simpsons surgery.

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Speaking for our canine patients: How to find and communicate signs of chronic pain – DVM 360

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Veterinarians are keenly aware that many patients present with signs of pain that may be unrecognized or misinterpreted by the owner as normal aging. During a recent Fetch dvm360 virtual conference, Michael Petty, DVM, owner of Arbor Pointe Veterinary Hospital and Animal Pain Centerin Canton, Michigan, discussed how veterinarians could better detect pain in their canine patients and communicate this pain to owners. Owners see their dog every single day, and many painful behaviors can become the norm for that owner to observe, he said.

There are many reasons why owners may not realize their dog is in pain, and it is the veterinarians responsibility to show them what we are seeing. Petty started by dispelling common myths surrounding pain in dogs.

Many veterinarians have heard owners say that their older dog can no longer do a particular activity, such as jump on the couch, followed by, Well, at least theyre not in pain because the dog is not vocalizing. But, as we watch the dog walk around our exam room with a stiff gait or struggle to rise, we know the truth. Silence does not signify the absence of pain. Although dogs will vocalize in an acutely painful situation, they rarely convey when pain is chronic.

Another common misconception is that the dog is just getting old. Petty noted that old dogs can still do the same activities as younger ones. They lose muscle mass over time, just like humans, so they must do these activities at a lower level, but many older dogs still want to run and jump and go for walks. Chronic pain is what keeps many of these dogs from doing activities they previously enjoyed.

In some cases, owners are aware that their pet is in pain, but worry that medications arent safe for older pets. This is our chance to educate clients that many medications are, in fact, safe but that alternative therapies exist as well, such as physical therapy and acupuncture, Petty said.

Finally, some owners are concerned about their budget and whether they can afford to treat their dogs pain. According to Petty, there are 4 budgets that we deal with in each case: emotional, physical, time, and money. One of the great things about veterinary medicine is that we can often do something for the pet to help ease its pain and stay within the owners financial constraints.

Before we can show an owner that their pet is in pain, we must find it. Detecting pain starts as soon as the patient arrives at the clinic, and all members of the veterinary team play a role. When patients enter the clinic, team members should observe how they walk. Do their hind feet scuff on the floor? Do they lag behind the owner? How do they take a step, such as over a curb in the parking lot? Team members can pass this information on to the veterinarian prior to the exam.

The next step is to screen for pain using chronic pain scales. It is always important because pain might not be obvious to the client or to you, said Petty. It is always obvious to the dog or cat in pain, but they may not care to show it.

Several validated pain scales exist. Veterinarians should select a scale that is easy to use and designed specifically for dogs in chronic pain situations, such as the Canine Brief Pain Inventory1 or Liverpool Osteoarthritis in Dogs.2 The client questionnaire portions of these scales can be used to screen for signs of pain that may not be observed in the clinic. Veterinarians can use pain scales along with the examination as a part of the new Canine OsteoArthritis Staging Tool,3 which allows them to assess for early risk factors and monitor patients throughout their life for the advancement of disease and assessment of therapy.

Once initial observations and screening questionnaires are completed, the veterinarian can perform a thorough pain examination. Once the veterinarian becomes skilled at this exam, it can usually be performed in a matter of minutes as part of a thorough physical. Petty offered several tips for how to perform a pain exam on canine patients:

Except in the case of very small dogs, pain examinations are best performed with the patient on the floor.

Observe the patients stance and how they rise from the floor. A nonpainful dog will jump up with all 4 limbs nearly simultaneously. A dog with hind end pain will stand with front limbs first, then pull the rest of the body to a standing position.

Many dogs will shake their body after rising. A normal dog will shake from nose to tail, whereas a dog in pain will stop shaking their body at the painful location.

Start by petting the dog to help it relax and to generally feel for areas of heat or sensitivity.

Assess passive range of motion in each limb. Multiple joints can be assessed together by moving the limb, and placing a hand or finger over the joint can allow you to feel for the presence of crepitus.

Dont forget to check the toes and look for signs of scuffing in the hindlimbs. This will be most notable on the nails of the middle digits, which may be worn down.

Check for spine and neck pain. An easy way to assess neck pain is to hold a treat, move it around, and watch how the patient moves its neck and head to follow the treat.

If a patient is too aggressive to examine, reschedule for a day when an oral premedication can be given. It is also okay to perform the exam and radiographs under full sedation, but there are some pain responses you wont be able to assess in these cases.

The final step in confirming pain in canine patients is diagnostics.

Radiographs are the number one diagnostic tool we have to find a problem, confirm our clinical impression, and convince the owner that their pet is painful, Petty said. He encouraged veterinarians to show the client the radiographs, point out abnormalities, and even consider sending them a copy of the image with markings on it to show concerning areas along with a written explanation of the findings.

It is in our patients best interest that we identify pain early so we can intervene and improve quality and quantity of life. By building confidence in our skills to detect pain and communicate it clearly with owners, we can discuss treatment options. By treating our painful patients, we will not only improve the quality of their life but also the strength of the bond they share with their owners.

Kate Boatright, VMD, a 2013 graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, is a practicing veterinarian and freelance speaker and author in western Pennsylvania. She is passionate about mentorship, education, and addressing common sources of stress for veterinary teams and recent graduates. Outside of clinical practice, Boatright is actively involved in organized veterinary medicine at the local, state, and national levels.

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Roy C. "Curt" Moore – The Gazette

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

ROY C. "CURT" MOORE Cedar Rapids

Roy C. "Curt" Moore, of Cedar Rapids, passed away Sunday, Feb. 7, 2021, at Mercy Medical Center of cardiac arrest. Curt was born in Vincennes, Ind., on May 6, 1956, to Charles C. and Pauline (Miller) Moore. He spent his entire youth in the same house in Palestine, Ill. After graduating as valedictorian of his high school class, Curt went on to earn a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in Terre Haute, Ind. Curt later earned his Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from The University of Iowa. He enjoyed tinkering with radios, and had an Amateur Radio License most of his life. Curt was delighted when he was offered a position in Government Systems at Rockwell-Collins, now Collins Aerospace. Curt worked on many different programs as an EE, and grew to be a very effective technical project manager. Curt's 33 years of working for Collins brought many experiences he may not have had if he'd worked elsewhere. He had the opportunity to work in Melbourne, Australia, for three months for one program. While working on teams with others Curt obtained five patents. In 2008, Curt was the Corporate Winner of the Rockwell-Collins Engineer of the Year award. On Sept. 18, 1982, Curt married Pamela J. Clevenger at Trinity United Methodist Church in Cedar Rapids. Together they enjoyed traveling, whether in a cabin on Lake Superior's North Shore, a resort in Hawaii, or a tent at a Wisconsin State Park. Their "kids" consisted of a vast assortment of dogs, cats and even a domestic rat. Curt particularly liked Pugs, and grew to really get a kick out of the antics of cats. He leaves behind one Pug dog, one Ragdoll and three Siamese cats. Curt loved photography, particularly taking photos of nature. He was often a participant in The Gazette's Fall Call of the Colors publications. Whenever Curt went on vacation he always had his camera present. In retirement one of Curt's favorite activities was having lunch every Wednesday with former co-workers Don, Jim and Jerry. Preceding Curt in death are his parents; his father-in-law, Paul Ferguson; his sister and brother-in-law, Charlotte and Clarence Miller; and brother-in-law, Bob Clevenger. He is survived by his wife, Pam; his mother-in-law, JoAnn Ferguson; sister-in-law, Amanda Clevenger; five nephews and two nieces; and several cousins, as well as a host of very dear friends. A Celebration of Life will take place in May. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Iowa Raptor Project, (Macbride Nature Recreation Area, 2095 Mehaffey Bridge Rd. NE, Solon, IA 52333; Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine (Hixson-Lied Small Animal Hospital, Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center, 1809 S. Riverside Drive, Ames, IA 50011); or a charity of your choice. Online condolences may be left for the family at cedarmemorial.com under obituaries.

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Diversity Learning Cafs Continue in the New Year – Purdue Veterinary News

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

Friday, February 12, 2021

Last semester, the Purdue Veterinary Medicine Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion launched a new Virtual Learning Caf series featuring critical conversations designed to foster discussion with the intent to enlighten, encourage, and inspire others to get engaged. That series continues this semester with discussions that will be held monthly on Wednesdays from 12:30 1:20 p.m. The sessions will include 50-minute online discussions centered around the topic of Difficult Conversations one of the topics requested most in a survey sent to faculty, staff, and students this summer by the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in an effort to identify topics of interest for the series.

The first of these lectures, entitled Intent to Impact, to be held on Wednesday, February 24, will feature a presentation by Monica Diaz, author of the business memoir From Intent to Impact: The 5 Dualities of Diversity and Inclusion. Ms. Diaz is associate vice president of talent, engagement, diversity, and inclusion at Royal Caribbean Group, the second largest cruise company in the world, and vice chair and board member of the Puerto Rican Arts Alliance. She is highly regarded as an energetic public speaker on global diversity and inclusion strategies and leadership development.

The second caf will take place Wednesday, March 24 with guest speaker Marian Vasser, who will speak on the topic Engaging in Difficult Dialogue. Ms. Vasser serves as executive director of diversity and equity at the University of Louisville where she leads campus and community-wide diversity education and training. In recognition of her leadership, she was selected to participate in Harvard Universitys Leading for Student Success in Higher Education training program. Her training and workshops focus on topics such as Implicit Bias, Microaggressions, Privilege and Power, Cultural Humility, and Engaging in Difficult Dialogues.

Closing out the spring series will be a talk by Stacy Lennon on Wednesday, April 21, entitled, Difficult Conversations with Complex People. Ms. Lennon is a negotiation advisor, coach, and trainer for Triad Consulting Group and also teaches graduate-level negotiation and leadership classes at the Tufts Gordon Institute. She has over 25 years of experience working with clients across the globe with a focus on helping clients more clearly and explicitly link thought, action, and results. A few of her past clients include Bank of America, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, Boeing, General Mills, Microsoft, Pixar, Raytheon, the US Postal Service, World Health Organization, World Bank, and the Singapore Police Force.

Click here to register for the upcoming Virtual Learning Cafs. Up to 60 registrants in attendance will be eligible to receive a book after each session.

Interested in participating in additional diversity and inclusion events on campus? Click here for information on Purdue Universitys Pursuing Racial Justice Together Lecture Series.

Writer(s): Jonathan Martz, PVM Communications Intern | pvmnews@purdue.edu

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The dean of the UC Davis Medical School discusses the vaccination rollout, patient care – The Aggie

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

UC Davis is currently vaccinating patients 65 and older. To find out when they are eligible, patients can register for an account with MyUCDavisHealth

Having only worked at UC Davis for six months before the outbreak of COVID-19, Dr. Allison Brashear, the dean of the UC Davis School of Medicine, said that partnering with the UC Davis campus has been crucial when adjusting to the ever-changing conditions of the pandemic. On March 2, 2020, Brashear met with over 25 researchers and clinicians to discuss pandemic operations.

We had a call to action on March 2, with the campus and the School of Medicine on what are we going to do about the pandemic, clinical trials, developing, testing [and] improving patient care, Brashear said. And everybody jumped in with both feet in terms of getting research approved and moving forward developing testing and really working as one team.

Before coming to UC Davis, Brashear worked as the chair of the Department of Neurology at Wake Forest University for 15 years. Now, as the dean of the UC Davis School of Medicine, she said that her role has evolved during the pandemic to focus on strategy and operations. She has also participated in new initiatives such as a Deans Call and a Deans Discuss Podcast in collaboration with the School of Veterinary Medicine.

Beginning on March 2, we developed a daily Deans Call which we did for almost two months, Brashear said. We still have those Deans Calls twice a week, where we actually real-time problem-solve issues about surge testing [or] vaccinations.

Less than two weeks after the meeting in early March, UC Davis Health developed its own internal rapid testing system where tests were run through an onsite machine instead of outsourced to a lab. The university also pioneered the saliva test on Nov. 10, 2020, and initiated clinical trials relating to the vaccine, the most recent in late Dec. 2020.

According to Brashear, she is most proud of UC Davis adaptability and swift development of testing and clinical trials.

Im particularly proud of the inclusion of research in our day-to-day clinical care, Brashear said. That goes from standing up a test in the middle of March to bringing clinical trials in record time to our patients at the bedside and in the clinics.

Since the development of different varieties of COVID-19 vaccines, UC Davis has administered over 40,000 vaccines in total and is currently vaccinating patients 65 and older.

As the vaccination rollout continues, Brashear said that she hopes for other vaccines to be approved in the near future to allow for more widespread vaccination.

There have been some challenges about the vaccine rollout, Brashear said. We are looking forward to additional vaccines being approved, including AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson. In general, one of the challenges has been lots of people that want the vaccine but not enough providers to deliver the vaccine.

According to her, UC Davis has thus far been a model in safety and in vaccination of its frontline healthcare workers.

Our goal is to really vaccinate our health care workers so that we can make sure that they are all safe, Brashear said. Our frontline workers are a priority. About 82% of our [health care workers] have been vaccinated with at least one shot.

Brashear stated that she is grateful overall for the work UC Davis Health has been able to accomplish, bolstered by a partnership with the campus.

Im really proud of the collaboration with main campus to really improve [the] health of our patients at UC Davis Health but also to move science forward, Brashear said. Its really been a team effort over the last 10 months.

To find more information about receiving the COVID-19 vaccine, patients can create an account with MyUCDavisHealth. Patients will be notified when they are eligible to be vaccinated.

Written by: Sophie Dewees features@theaggie.org

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Veterinary Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Manufacturing Market Size Worth $10.4 Billion By 2028: Grand View Research, Inc. – PRNewswire

Sunday, February 14th, 2021

SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 8, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- The global veterinary active pharmaceutical ingredients manufacturing marketsize is expected to reach USD 10.4 billion by 2028, according to a new report by Grand View Research, Inc., expanding at a CAGR of 6.9% from 2021 to 2028. The increasing prevalence of chronic diseases in animals and growing concerns among pet owners are the key contributors to the market growth.

Key suggestions from the report:

Read 102 page research report with ToC on "Veterinary Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients Manufacturing Market Size, Share & Trends Analysis Report By Service Type (In-house, Contract Outsourcing), By Synthesis Type, By Product, By Region, And Segment Forecasts, 2021 - 2028" at: https://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/veterinary-active-pharmaceutical-ingredients-manufacturing-market

Moreover, the growing prevalence of zoonotic diseases is driving the demand for drugs, which, in turn, boosts the demand for active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) for the production of these drugs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in July 2017, it was estimated that 6 out of 10 known infectious diseases in people can be transmitted from animals and 3 out of every 4 novel or emerging infectious diseases in people are caused due to animals.

Government organizations are involved in issuing various guidelines to promote veterinary services globally, which is expected to contribute to market growth in the coming years. For instance, in May 2018, the OIE International Standards, a part of the WTO framework, issued standards to improve animal health, which will affect human health as well. One of the key challenges was found to be the lack of technical expertise in this field.

The rising number of veterinarians is also anticipated to boost the market growth. According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, in 2018, there were 113,394 veterinarians in the U.S. as compared to 110,531 veterinarians in 2017. Out of these, 48,898 were involved in private clinical practice exclusively for companion animals. Also, according to the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), the approximate number of veterinarians in Canada is 12,921.

Grand View Research has segmented the global veterinary active pharmaceutical ingredients manufacturing market on the basis of service type, synthesis type, product, and region:

List of Key Players of Veterinary API Manufacturing Market

Find more research reports on Animal Health Industry, by Grand View Research:

Gain access to Grand View Compass, our BI enabled intuitive market research database of 10,000+ reports

About Grand View Research

Grand View Research, U.S.-based market research and consulting company, provides syndicated as well as customized research reports and consulting services. Registered in California and headquartered in San Francisco, the company comprises over 425 analysts and consultants, adding more than 1200 market research reports to its vast database each year. These reports offer in-depth analysis on 46 industries across 25 major countries worldwide. With the help of an interactive market intelligence platform, Grand View Research helps Fortune 500 companies and renowned academic institutes understand the global and regional business environment and gauge the opportunities that lie ahead.

Contact:

Sherry JamesCorporate Sales Specialist, USAGrand View Research, Inc.Phone: 1-415-349-0058Toll Free: 1-888-202-9519Email: [emailprotected] Web: https://www.grandviewresearch.com Follow Us: LinkedIn| Twitter

SOURCE Grand View Research, Inc.

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Veterinary medicine, motherhood, and a pandemic – DVM 360

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Last year was hard on everyone. By mid-March, the reality of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began to set in around the globe, and much of the world shut down. Of course, veterinary hospitals did not have the luxury of shuttering their doors to protect themselves. In addition to your regular clientele, it seemed as though much of the world reacted to the stress of the pandemic by getting a puppy or a kitten. Once shelters were emptied and the reality of pet ownership set in, seemingly all of these new pets needed to be seen at your hospital. And you needed to be there for patients and clients.

Katie Buchanan, VMD, an associate veterinarian at Bayside Animal Medical Center in Severna Park, Maryland, and mother of a 1- and a 4-year-old, is doing everything she can to meet her clients needs, and it is still not enough. We are one of few [practices] in the area taking new clients, but we are overwhelmed, she says. I have nearly 30 callbacks in a day but no time to do them.

Whats more, because the practice is curbside, Buchanan spends much of her day on the phone. I dearly miss my clients and the bond we have. I hate that this is life right now, she says. But we cannot stay 6 feet apart from our staff, and we cannot keep this pace and go back to letting people in right now, or we will get a positive staff member and have to close.

Like Buchanan, you are likely busier than ever at your hospital, straining to meet the needs of a growing client roster while reworking the logistical flow of the entire practice to transform from a regular veterinary hospital to a full-service curbside machine. You are implementing new client communication technology and learning how to use it when all parties involved have a very short fuse. As you perform this magic, you may also be managing a revolving door of critical staff members testing positive for COVID-19 and needing to isolate for weeks, whether they are sick or not.

With no federally mandated safety policies, it is up to individual hospitals to create their own protocols and then try to get buy-in from staff to execute the plan. You may be at odds with your staff and clients on how to keep each other safe. You contact trace, you quarantine, and you worry about the safety of your clients, coworkers, and families. Are you really able to protect yourself and your family?

And then there are the clients, from the new owners who adopted a pet without considering the expense, training, and commitment involved to seasoned pet owners facing personal illnesses and economic uncertainty. A trip to the veterinarian is typically stressful for pets and their owners alike. Now they have the added stress of the virus, financial issues, masks, and a new paradigm for veterinary care in which they cannot accompany their pet inside, they cannot communicate in person with the veterinarian and staff, and they feel out of control. In short, clients are stressed, and many of them are taking it out on us.

Life is hard for veterinarians who are also mothers. The cost of veterinary school does not discriminate among genders or rely on ones parental status. As of 2018, both men and women paid between $148,807 and $407,983 for 4 years of veterinary school tuition, fees, and living expenses.1 According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, our profession was 61.8% women in 2018, but only 29.3% of practice owners were women.2 This matters because the average owner earns about $200,000 more than the average associate.3

Although there are no available data on how many veterinarians are parents, a 2015 survey of boarded large animal surgeons (published in 2019) reported that men (88%) were more likely than women (68%) to be married or in a domestic partnership and to have children (77% vs 47%, respectively). Yet women were more likely than men to require external childcare services and reported that having children had negatively impacted their professional lives.4 The same study showed that women earned less than men and were less likely to own a veterinary practice or hold a prestigious academic title. Men and women felt differently about the effect of gender in the workplace.

Female veterinarians pay for the same education and learn the same skills as their male counterparts. So why do women earn less, are less likely to hold a prestigious academic title, and are much less likely to own a practice? Bias and discrimination in the workplace are certainly at play here, but we also need to consider the effect of our home lives and domestic responsibilities when we think of career advancement. Here are some more statistics about gender differences in the US workforce:

Married mothers spend almost twice as much time on housework and childcare than married fathers.5

Mothers are far more likely to be working now than in past decades, yet they still spend more time on child care today than did moms in the 1960s.5

Success at work really means more work at home for women. The more economically dependent men are on their wives, the less housework they do. Even women with unemployed husbands spend considerably more time on household chores than their spouses.6

On top of an already untenable situation, we now find ourselves in a global pandemic, with many schools and daycares closed or operating virtually. So what now?

Meghan Knox, DVM, mother to a 16-month-old and a relief veterinarian in New Jersey, says what so many of us are feeling. I deeply crave a level of relaxation that I am simply unable to achieve, given the state of the world, she says. My family needs a vacation, someplace lovely like the Caribbean. My dentist recently determined that Ive been clenching my teeth from stress, so now I officially see physical manifestations of the stress of the past 8 months.

Knox has missed out on the normal practices of motherhood. Im still grieving the many losses of this yearmissed trips, missed first birthday celebration we had imagined for the baby, canceled weddings and showers, and family unable to travel to meet the baby. It is sadness and fatigue, and theres just zero patience left for anything else in any area of my life.

After reading this, are you surprised to hear that female veterinarians have a higher prevalence of risk factors for suicide, including depression and suicide ideation and attempts? According to 2018 data, female veterinarians are 2.4 times as likely as the general US population to commit suicide, whereas male veterinarians are 1.6 times as likely as the general US population.7

If you are a veterinarian and mother, you hold 2 roles, both of which require handling anything that comes your way with skill, alacrity, and infinite patience when everyone who depends on you is at maximum neediness day and night. You are on call 24/7. If they dont sleep, you dont sleep. You must anticipate and meet everyones needs in a world that is moving every single day. And, in the face of it all, you must maintain your composure and compassion and never, ever make a mistake.

Vet moms, let me be the first to tell you that you are managing the impossible and performing at a superhuman level. I am not afraid to say that sustaining the status quo is not tenable. Individually, each of you is keeping the world spinning on its axis each and every day. Collectively, you are a massive portion of a profession that is already under enormous stress. Together, we must reimagine both roles and create an organizational structure that supports the veterinarian mothers our profession depends on. The question is, how?

Liz Bales, VMD, has a special interest in the unique behavioral and wellness needs of cats. She is a writer, speaker, and featured expert in all things cat around the globe. Bales sits on the Deans Alumni Board at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine and on the advisory boards for dvm360, AAFP Cat Friendly Practice, Vet Candy, and Fear Free.

References

1. How much does it cost to attend veterinary school? VIN Foundation. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://iwanttobeaveterinarian.org/how-much-does-it-cost-to-attend-veterinary-school/

2. Burns K. Census of veterinarians finds trends with shortages, practice ownership. American Veterinary Medical Association. June 26, 2019.Accessed January 25, 2021. https://www.avma.org/javma-news/2019-07-15/census-veterinarians-finds-trends-shortages-practice-ownership

3. Lee R. Is your veterinary practice ready to add an associate? Praxis. March 17, 2015. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://www.praxisvet.com/veterinary-practice-transition-blog/is-your-veterinary-practice-ready-to-add-an-associate#:~:text=Statistics%20show%20that%20an%20experienced,more%20than%20the%20average%20associate

4. Colopy SA, Buhr KA, Bruckner KB, Morello SL. The intersection of personal and professional lives for male and female diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons in 2015. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2019;255(11):1283-1290. doi:10.2460/javma.255.11.1283 https://stats.oecd.org/index.aspx?queryid=54757

5. Bianchi SM, Sayer LC, Milkie MA, Robinson JP. Housework: who did, does or will do it, and how much does it matter? Soc Forces. 2012;91(1):55-63. doi:10.1093/sf/sos120

6. Rao AH. Even breadwinning wives dont get equality at home. The Atlantic. May 12, 2019. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://www.theatlantic.com/family/archive/2019/05/breadwinning-wives-gender-inequality/589237/

7. New study finds higher than expected number of suicide deaths among U.S. veterinarians. Press release. December 20, 2018. Accessed January 25, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/p1220-veterinarians-suicide.html

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Purdue Trustees Approve Naming of New Vet Hospital – Hoosier Ag Today

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

David Brunner describes his work as a veterinarian as the most enjoyable profession in the world. I go to work and play with puppies and kittens. He credits his time as a student at Purdue University, capped by earning a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree in 1979, for fueling his passion.

Now, the new veterinary hospital at Purdue will be named the David and Bonnie Brunner Purdue Veterinary Medical Hospital Complex in recognition of a $10 million leadership commitment from David and Bonnie Brunner.

Purdue trustees approved the naming on Friday (Feb. 5).

The 162,500-square-foot complex will include three facilities located just east of the existing Lynn Hall of Veterinary Medicine:

* The David and Bonnie Brunner Small Animal Hospital, which will add 65,000 square feet to the existing small animal hospital facilities in Lynn Hall, which amount to about 40,000 square feet.

* The David and Bonnie Brunner Equine Hospital providing 73,000 square feet of new space.

* The David and Bonnie Brunner Farm Animal Hospital amounting to 24,000 square feet and replacing facilities in the existing large animal hospital.

As the pandemic has underscored, a state-of-the-art veterinary medicine program now not only benefits our animal population, but is an integral element in protecting human health, Purdue President Mitch Daniels said. Thanks to David and Bonnie, Indiana and the nation will now have such an invaluable asset.

David Brunner is the owner of the Broad Ripple Animal Clinic (BRAC), a business he founded on the north side of Indianapolis in 1981 with one employee. BRAC now has nine full-time veterinarians and is one of the 15% of hospitals in the U.S. accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association. Brunner retired as a practicing clinical veterinarian in 2012 but continues to be involved with the clinic as chief visionary and staff cheerleader.

Brunner has been a member of the Indiana Veterinary Medical Association, the American Veterinary Medical Association and the American Animal Hospital Association. He is a past president of the Indianapolis Humane Society, having previously served on the board for 10 years.In addition, Brunner has authored two books, The Dog Owners Manual and The Cat Owners Manual, currently published in 12 languages worldwide.

Bonnie (MacLeod) Brunner holds degrees in economics and comparative politics and an MBA in finance from UCLA. She retired from trading atMorganStanley and ownsLupo Design & Build, a luxury contemporary residential home building company in Hermosa Beach, California. She balances this business with her role as chief financial officer of the veterinary practice and managing the couples personal and commercial properties. Bonnie was actively involved in animal rescue organizations in Los Angeles before meeting David.

The Brunners split their time between Indianapolis; Southern California; and St. Barths, French West Indies.

My years at Purdue were life-changing, David Brunner said. It took me a while to appreciate the incredible education I received from Purdues vet school. To this day, I reflect with sincere appreciation on the many professors and clinical instructors who helped shape me into the veterinarian I became.

Bonnie and I have been presented with an extraordinary opportunity to contribute to the construction of the new veterinary medical complex. It is our hope that this contribution will aid and inspire veterinary students, now and for years to come. I am passionate about companion animal practice and have a special interest in inspiring the entrepreneurial spirit in vetstudents and teaching them theart of veterinary practice and thebusiness of veterinary medicine.

The couple is looking forward to having an active role in the Purdue Alumni Association and to finally attending some Boilermaker football games, as they joke, We did not have time to do things like that when we were in school because we were always studying.

The design of the new complex optimizes hands-on learning for students and creates dedicated space for community engagement opportunities. In addition, the complexs larger footprint and updated equipment will increase clinical research and allow faculty researchers to respond to more clinical trial opportunities, thus expanding the College of Veterinary Medicines reputation as a world-renowned research institute.

Due to the generosity of David and Bonnie Brunner, our vision of constructing a true state-of-the-art hospital is becoming a reality, said Willie M. Reed, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine. The new hospital will provide a wonderful learning environment for our students, enable our faculty to advance their clinical research programs that involve clinical trials and greatly enhance our capability to deliver the highest quality care to our animal patients. I am especially grateful to have an alumnus of the college and his wife make such an impactful contribution to the colleges future success.

Slated to be completed by December and open by spring 2022, the new complex will provide for the varied needs of clients while also maximizing efficiency. For the first time, horses will have their own equine hospital rather than being treated at the same facility as farm animals like cows, pigs and sheep, which will be attended to at the new farm animal hospital. Efficiencies in the existing hospital facility will be incorporated into the new structures. For example, expensive imaging technology will be located centrally so it can be accessed from both the small animal and equine hospitals, which mirrors current practice in the existing facilities. Some small animal services will remain at the current small animal hospital.

In addition to treating animals, the hospital complex will serve as a catalyst for interdisciplinary research, including cancer drug discovery and the development of treatments for paralysis.

Total cost of the project is $108 million. Purdue has committed $35 million, which includes ongoing fundraising by the College of Veterinary Medicine, and the state of Indiana approved a $73 million appropriation.

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Ohio State veterinary researchers hope to prevent the next pandemic – The Columbus Dispatch

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Max Filby|The Columbus Dispatch

The world is still in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic,but local researchers are working to stop the next outbreak right at the source.

COVID-19 is widely thought to have started in bats before jumping to another animal and then transmitting to humans in Wuhan, China, the original epicenter of the virus. That's why doctorsat Ohio State University's College of Veterinary Medicine are keeping a close eye on animals right now.

Their goal, is to make sure COVID-19 doesn't infect an animal, mutate, and then jump back into the human population. They've also got their eyes on a number of other emerging infectious diseases to try to prevent them from jumpstarting the next pandemic.

>>Read More: Some Ohio hospital workers got COVID vaccine even though they didn't fit rollout guidelines

"This type of surveillance, it's a needle in a haystack," said Dr. Vanessa Hale, assistant professor of veterinary preventive medicine. "What we are looking for may not be very widelypresent … But, if and when we find it, it will tell us some really important things about who can get a virus."

Viruses are sometimes nicknamed for the animal they jump from, such as the H1N1 "swine flu" that emerged in 2009 and the H5N1 "bird flu" that first showed up in 1996, according to the federalCenters for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ohio State researchers trying to prevent the next pandemic

Studying the way COVID-19 could jump from animals to humans is underway at the Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine.

Doral Chenoweth, The Columbus Dispatch

Although animal surveillance is always conducted as a precaution against infectious diseases, it's taken on new visibility and importance in the age of COVID-19.

Coronaviruses are common in bats, but late last year it appeared that COVID-19 was able to jump from mink to humans. Denmark, which was home to a majority of the world's minksand is the biggest exporter of mink fur, ended up killing most of the animals out of fear that they could re-infect people.

An estimated 60% of known diseases, such asrabies, salmonella, West Nile virus and Lyme disease,can spread from animals, according to the CDC.Around 75% of new infectious diseases in people come from animals.

"The idea of emergingdiseases starting in an animal population and jumping to humans is definitely a big concern,"said Dr. Jenessa Winston, an assistant professor. "Alarge percentage of infectious diseases that jump into humans come from an animal source or have an animal reservoir."

Preventing the next outbreak before it begins is always the goal. Butthe coronavirus pandemic has made it clear that may not always be possible, which is why the world needs to be more prepared, said Dr. Joseph Gastaldo, medical director of infectious diseases at OhioHealth.

In the time since the pandemic began in mid-March, local, state and national leaders were forced to scramble to prepare for the worst.

Central Ohio leaders developed a blueprint for the Greater Columbus Convention Center to be transformed into a field hospital that luckily never came to fruition. Area hospitalsthat were once competitorshad to collaborate more closely to plan for asurge in cases.

While the quick planning proved successful, Gastaldo said it shouldn't have to come together at last minute. Instead, the U.S. should treat public health and its health care system more like its military.

>>Read More: COVID-19: Only 4% of Columbus vaccinations went to Black residents, mirroring state trend

"Just like 9/11, this changed everything," Gastaldo said. "Ifeel that COVID will leave us in a better position when it comes to the next pandemic. … This is equivalent to a world war."

If temporary measures like masking, distancing, curfews and stay-at-home orders are the epidemiological parallel towarfare, then what Hale and her colleagues do at Ohio State may be the frontline of defense.

Surveilling animals for emerging diseases has a long history and is used at many of the nation's zoos. Animals moved from one zoo to another sometimes have to be quarantined temporarily to make sure they don't introduce a virus to their new home.

While not perfect, keeping a close eye on critters for diseases is tried and true science, Hale said. When it comes to emerging diseases, Hale said,if people take care of animalsthey'll also be taking care of themselves.

She's hopeful coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic that there will be more of a push and more funding for research on emerging diseases in animals.

"It's hard to get people motivated to do a bunch of testing and surveillance of animals when they may come up with nothing," Hale said. "This is something that is going to receive more attention because it's critical we do this … to prevent future pandemics. It's thatintersectionof human health and environmental health."

mfilby@dispatch.com

@MaxFilby

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A world leader of veterinary medicine in Newry and caring for children in the Western Trust: GetGot reveals exciting and rewarding new jobs – The…

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

1

Established in 1969 in Newry, Norbrook is one of the largest, family owned, veterinary pharmaceutical companies in the world.

Their portfolio of trusted animal health products is distributed in more than 100 countries through their regional sales team and a network of longstanding distribution partners.

They have a history of product innovation, investing significantly in research and development, and they have a strong pipeline of products, a key growth driver for the company.

A career at Norbrook offers you an exceptional opportunity to achieve your potential with a world class global provider of veterinary pharmaceuticals enhancing the health of farm and companion animals.

The IT Project Manager is a unique role within the company and applications are open now.

2

The appointed staff nurse will work predominantly in the childs own home within the Western Trust but will also be required to work in the Childrens IPU.

They will participate in the assessment, planning and delivery of care to the children and the delegation of care to non-registered members of the care team promoting a philosophy of holistic care and active engagement of children and families.

The role will include both day and night duty.

The successful candidate will regularly report to and work under the direction of the Childrens Hospice Nurse Specialist Team Lead when working with the Community and Care Team Manager, ensuring that all aspects of care are carried out to the agreed standards and in accordance with all current policies and procedures of Northern Ireland Childrens Hospice.

This is a combined role based between Western Health & Social Care Trust Area & Horizon House IPU.

Sign up for your free jobseeker account with getgotjobs.co.uk. Well keep you informed about new job opportunities and youll also find a wealth of information, helpful hints and tips on how to secure your ideal job.

Sponsored by

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Do pets need to get the COVID-19 vaccine? – WFMYNews2.com

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Two Charlotte veterinarians say getting your pet vaccinated for COVID-19 isn't an option right now but interest is growing.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. A recent article from the New York Post about dogs and cats possibly needing the COVID-19 vaccine has pet owners talking on social media.

With vaccine supplies in short supply, some people are wondering when their pet would be eligible for a vaccine, if it's safe or whether they need it at all.

As Wake Up Charlotte viewers know, our pets are a big part of our lives, as well as our viewers. So, WCNC Charlotte's Rachel Lundberg went to two Charlotte veterinarians to get the answers.

So, do our dogs and cats need to be vaccinated for COVID-19? Here's what we learned after talking to two Charlotte veterinarians.

Marnie Gallagher, doctor of veterinarian medicine, at Armstrong Animal Clinic and Dr. Fred Wininger, a neurologist neurosurgeon at Charlotte Referral and Emergency, agreed that household pets are not a big concern for either suffering severe illness or spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.

"There have been no cases where an animal, specifically dog and cat, has transmitted it back to people," Wininger said. "...and then also, animals that do get infected, which is rare, are often asymptomatic."

For the cases confirmed in animals, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) tracks each diagnosis through an interactive map, which shows one case in South Carolina and two in North Carolina over the course of this pandemic.

"The one in North Carolina was last July, and it was a house dog, then there was a dog last November that was in a shelter situation," Gallagher said.

But even though the numbers are low, there is *interest*in potentially vaccinating our pets for COVID-19 down the road, especially following outbreaks detected in minks, which the New York Post also wrote about.

Enough *interest* that there are some companies that are looking at developing vaccines, Gallagher says.

"More for the big cats and minx than anything else, but none have been approved by the USDA," she added.

So, at this time, dogs and cats cannot get the COVID-19 vaccine, nor is it believed necessary.

"It is likely safe on most animals, but the efficacy of it in animals is unknown, and no dog or cat has died from the virus," Wininger said.

To read more about what the CDC says regarding COVID-19 and animals, click here.

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Texas A&M Researchers Discover Energy Drinks’ Harmful Effects On Heart – Texas A&M University Today

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Researchers evaluated 17 widely available over-the-counter brands.

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A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart.

The study, led byDr. Ivan Rusyn, a professor in theVeterinary Integrative Biosciences (VIBS) Department at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS), was published in Food and Chemical Toxicology. In it, researchers observed cardiomyocytes human heart cells grown in a laboratory exposed to some energy drinks showed an increased beat rate and other factors affecting cardiac function.

Dr. Ivan Rusyn

Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

When placed in the context of the human body, consumption of these beverages has been linked to improper beating of the heart, cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle which makes it difficult for the heart to pump blood), increased blood pressure, and other heart conditions.

With the global sales of energy drinks estimated at $53 billion in 2018 and rapidly growing, it is important to understand the potential unintended health consequences associated with these beverages, according to Rusyn.

Because the consumption of these beverages is not regulated and they are widely accessible over the counter to all age groups, the potential for adverse health effects of these products is a subject of concern and needed research, Rusyn said. Indeed, the consumption of energy drinks has been associated with a wide range of adverse health effects in humans, many of them are concerning the effects on the heart.

Researchers evaluated 17 widely available over-the-counter brands. They then treated cardiomyocytes with each drink.

Researchers also studied the composition of the energy drinks using novel methods. By comparing the effects and differing ingredient concentrations in each drink, they were able to infer which ingredients may be contributing more to adverse effects on the treated cardiomyocytes. Using mathematical models, researchers determined that the possible presence of theophylline, adenine and azelate, substances which can have negative effects on the heart.

Little is known about the ingredients that may contribute to the adverse effects of energy drinks on the heart, Rusyn said. Specifically, the evidence for cardiovascular effects from studies in humans remains inconclusive, as the controlled clinical trials were largely limited in the number of participants. They were tested only a limited number of energy drink types, and are difficult to compare directly, because they employed different methods to evaluate the function of the cardiovascular system.

Further research is warranted on the ingredients identified in this study to ensure the safety of their consumption, especially by consumers with pre-existing health conditions.

This study shows that some of the tested energy drinks may have effects on human cardiomyocytes, and these data corroborate other studies in humans, Rusyn said. Therefore, we hope that the consumers will carefully weigh the performance-enhancing benefits of these beverages versus the emerging data that suggests that they may have real adverse effects.

We also hope that the Food and Drug Administration takes a closer look at whether these beverages may need to be carefully reviewed with respect to possible labeling of their adverse health effects, and whether certain age groups and susceptible sub-populations should be advised against consumption of these beverages.

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Online presentation to discuss medical care of wild birds – Cheboygan Daily Tribune

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Kortny Hahn|Cheboygan Daily Tribune

The Feb. 10 meeting of the Straits Area Audubon Society beginning at 7 p.m. will feature a presentation by Dr. Carl Palazzolo regarding medical care of wild birds.

This presentation is being done online, via Zoom, in order to allow members and others interested in the presentation to remain safe in their homes during the pandemic, while learning some new information. It is free and open to the public, with the link to the meeting being posted at http://www.straitsareaaudubon.com.

"Presenter Dr. Carl Palazzolo has served with the Long Beach Animal Hospital in California since graduating from Michigan State University Veterinarian School in 1978," said Jim Bricker of Straits Area Audubon Society. "Dr. Palazzolo spends summers near Harbor Springs."

Bricker said Palazzolo has been giving talks for several decades, all of which have been entertaining, informative and also sprinkled with some humor.

When Palazzolo is in Northern Michigan, he hosts veterinarian training programs to help new veterinarians gain experience and confidence in the growing field of wildlife care. His presentation will feature a behind-the-scenes view of providing medical care for injured wildlife and exotic animals, especially birds.

During his career, he has also donated his time for birds and other wild animals and taking care of them. He has also lead several trips to countries like Tsavo and Borneo to look at other wildlife such as lions and orangutans.

"His stories and examples will include the diagnosis, treatment, and release of a barn owl that was hanging by its wing under an overpass, a red-tailed hawk with a fractured wing, and repairing an injured eye on an owl. We are super excited to host him all the way from California," said Herm Boatin, Straits Area Audubon Society president.

The program will cover substantial medical information that is seldom available to the public. Some of the photos are graphic in nature because they are taken from actual surgical procedures.

Besides the general public who care about animals, the presentation is ideal for budding wildlife rehabbers and students who want to learn more about wildlife and veterinary medicine," said Boatin.

It is the goal of the Straits Area Audubon Society to educate the public about the natural environment. Normally, the monthly meetings of the group are hosted at the Cheboygan Area Public Library, in the downstairs meeting room. Due to the COVID 19 pandemic, the meetings have switched online, via Zoom.

More information on the Straits Area Audubon Society and the link to the program can be found at its website, http://www.straitsareaaudubon.com.

For more information on the presenter, Palazzolo, visit https://www.lbah.com/wildlife-care/. You can also click on the wildlife photography link on that site to learn more about his digital photography.

Carl Palazzolo will be the presenter at the Feb. 10 Straits Area Audubon Society online meeting, discussing the medical care of wild animals and birds. Courtesy photo

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Dog food recall cites trace of deadly toxins – Arkansas Online

Tuesday, February 9th, 2021

Q: My neighbor's healthy young dog died suddenly of liver failure. The vet thinks the cause was aflatoxins in a new bag of dog food, since the food was later recalled. How can I prevent something similar from happening to my dog?

A: Aflatoxins are poisons produced by molds, particularly Aspergillus molds, that grow on grains such as corn and rice, as well as soybeans, tree nuts, peanuts and cottonseeds. These molds flourish under warm, moist growing and storage conditions.

Aflatoxins are not affected by heat, so they persist after food is processed. In December and January, Midwestern Pet Food recalled its Sportmix, Sportstrail, Nunn Better, Pro Pac and Splash pet foods after many dogs became ill or died after eating it, and testing showed very high levels of aflatoxins in the food.

In September and October, Sunshine Mills cited high aflatoxin levels when they recalled 17 brands of pet food.

While aflatoxins harm many animal species, dogs, especially puppies, are particularly sensitive.

Depending on how much aflatoxin is ingested, a dog can experience liver damage (even without clinical signs), liver failure or death. Aflatoxin exposure also causes liver cancer.

Signs of liver damage include decreased appetite and energy, regurgitation, diarrhea and jaundice, indicated by yellowing of the eyes, gums and skin. Clinical signs can begin within a day or two of ingestion or be delayed for weeks.

To protect your dog, buy pet food from large, well-established manufacturers with on-staff veterinary nutritionists who test the products in dogs. Ask your veterinarian for recommendations.

Store pet food in a clean, dry, cool place. Although most aflatoxin-tainted food doesn't show visible mold, don't feed moldy food or any food your dog suddenly dislikes, especially if it's from a new bag.

Never let your dog munch on livestock feed, because regulatory agencies permit aflatoxin levels to be 15 times higher in livestock feed than in pet food.

Q: A year ago, my wife took in Nugget, a stray kitten with long hair. My wife has obsessive-compulsive disorder, which manifests as compulsive housecleaning.

Because Nugget drops hair everywhere she goes, my wife locks her in a carrier 20 hours of every day. For the remaining few hours, Nugget is confined in one room to eat, drink and use the litter box.

We have a large house that I'm certain Nugget would enjoy exploring. It's too risky to let her go outdoors because of the predators in our rural area. I'd appreciate any ideas to persuade my wife to give Nugget the run of the house.

A: I'll begin by suggesting your wife consult her therapist about how her obsessive-compulsive disorder is affecting Nugget. Cognitive behavioral therapy, medication and other treatments can help.

Confining Nugget to a carrier most of each day is not only inhumane but can also contribute to a variety of health problems. For example, forcing her to hold her bladder all day increases her risk of urinary disease.

You can help by brushing Nugget daily, which should decrease the amount of hair around your home. Having her shaved also will decrease the volume of fur she sheds.

Fleas increase shedding, so make sure Nugget is treated throughout the year with a flea preventive. If she's shedding so much that her hair is sparse, make an appointment with her veterinarian.

If your wife remains unwilling to release Nugget from confinement, consider giving her to a family looking for an indoor cat to play throughout their home and snuggle with family members.

I'm certain your wife shares your desire to do what's best for Nugget. But you will have to take a stand to make that happen. Best wishes to all three of you.

Lee Pickett, VMD, practices companion animal medicine in North Carolina. Contact her at

vet@askthevet.pet

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Texas A&M Veterinarians Presented With First-Of-Its Kind Case – Texas A&M University Today

Sunday, February 7th, 2021

Janelle Overhouse and her dog Rory, a patient at Texas A&Ms Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

Michael Kellett/Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Doctors at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS) Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) were recently confronted with a big problem how to save a dog from a first-of-its-kind critical illness.

First, the six-year-old boxer named Rory was infected by a rare form of Salmonella that has never before been seen in a dog. And second, her Salmonella infection was the first to be found in a dogs brain.

Rorys story begins long before her infection. She first became a patient when she was diagnosed with a common, but serious, form of meningitis when she was a year old.

During her first visit to the VMTH in 2015, Rory was diagnosed with Steroid Responsive Meningitis-Arteritis (SRMA), an immune-mediated inflammatory disease common in boxers that can cause neck pain and fever.

Id never even heard of SRMA and didnt know anything about it, said Rorys owner Janelle Overhouse. Once I learned more, I found that it was something that could be chronic. That was really scary, because she was in a tremendous amount of pain.

Luckily, Rorys form of SRMA could be treated with a few months of immunosuppressive steroids that, when finished, allow the dog to return to a completely normal life. While SRMA tends to repeatedly flare up over the years, it can usually be treated the same way with minimal complications.

For some patients, however, the immunosuppressed state during treatment can cause its own problems, such as when dealing with infections that could normally be fought off by a healthy immune system. This was the case when it came to Rorys unique infection.

In late 2019, Rory was undergoing the final months of treatment for her first SRMA relapse when she began to show unusual symptoms.

Rory came back to the VMTH because she had some issues that didnt really fit SRMA, said Dr. Melissa Andruzzi, the veterinary chief resident at the hospital.

She had seizures and her behavior was very different. Shes normally a really happy-go-lucky kind of dog who loves everyone and wants to lick everyone, but now she was afraid of people and a little bit aggressive toward people she didnt know. It was just very different for her.

Working with veterinary neurologist Dr. Beth Boudreau, a CVMBS assistant professor, Andruzzi scheduled an MRI for Rory and noticed that her brain looked abnormal in some places, another issue not connected to SRMA. She then extracted a sample of spinal fluid and sent it to CVMBS associate professor Dr. Sara Lawhon and graduate assistant Mary Krath at the VMTHs Clinical Microbiology Lab, who found the presence of the Salmonella called enterica subspecies houtenae.

The infection was likely a bacteremia, meaning it had spread in her blood and had access to her whole body, she said. The reason her central nervous system was particularly affected is because its natural barrier (the blood brain barrier) was already compromised from her SRMA, allowing easy access for the Salmonella.

Despite the novel aspects of Rorys case, she was treated much like any other patient with a serious infection with several months of antibiotics. Rorys SRMA was fully cleared by the time she began her Salmonella treatments, allowing her to stop taking the immunosuppressant steroids and fight the infection with her full immune system.

Once Rory was back on the road to full health, only one question remained: How did she become the first dog to contract that form of Salmonella?

After talking to Overhouse, Andruzzi came to the conclusion that wild geckos in her backyard might have been the source of the infection.

This form of Salmonella is most commonly identified in reptiles and amphibians, and more than 90% of reptiles are asymptomatic carriers. They contaminate whatever environment theyre in, Andruzzi said. Rory very commonly interacted with these little geckos outside and in the garage. So while we dont know for sure, we think it probably came from that.

Even after Rory went home healthy and happy, the work was not done for Andruzzi and her coworkers.

After we had treated her so successfully, we thought it was very important to write her case up so that if anyone else saw this type of Salmonella in a dog, or any other Salmonella in a dogs brain or spinal cord, they at least would have Rorys case to read about and see how we treated her, Andruzzi said. We needed to contribute this knowledge so that other veterinarians can treat other pets just as well.

But for Overhouse, the joy from finally seeing her dog healthy outshines all other positive aspects of Rorys case.

Rorys doing really well now. You wouldnt know anything happened to her, Overhouse said. Her veterinary team was great; they seemed to really listen and they were all very caring. I feel like they really had her best interests at heart and I appreciated that very much.

Ive not had many other kinds of dogs besides boxers, so I know theyre very people oriented. Rory follows me everywhere I go, she said. She is definitely connected to me and I to her. Im always looking out for her.

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