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Archive for the ‘Fat Stem Cells’ Category

Singapore startup Shiok Meats re-creates shrimp in the lab – Los Angeles Times

Saturday, October 10th, 2020

In an industrial corner of Singapore, multiplying steadily in bioreactors heated precisely to 82 degrees, real shrimp meat is being grown from samples of the crustaceans microscopic cells.

Fed a nutrient-rich soup meant to mimic its diet in the wild, a single cell can reproduce over a trillion times into a mound of gray translucent flesh. Think of it as meat growing without all the other parts of the animal, including that chalky black vein.

The venture is being led by Sandhya Sriram and a team of scientists, who are attempting to upend one of the cornerstones of dim sum. Srirams company, Shiok Meats, is named after Singaporean slang used to declare something delicious.

Similar work is being done across the world at other startups and research labs to grow beef, pork, chicken and high-end specialty products such as bluefin tuna and foie gras, but Srirams company is the only one known to be focused on re-creating shrimp, a staple in many Asian dishes.

Shioks finished product this reporter was unable to try it because no outsiders are allowed to visit its headquarters during the pandemic possesses the texture of ground shrimp and has already been tested to make shumai, the Cantonese dim sum mainstay with the yellow dumpling wrapper. But its applications are potentially manifold in Chinese-centric cuisine.

Shrimp shumai made with lab-grown shrimp from Shiok Meats.

(Shiok Meats)

You could layer a dollop of it over a raft of tofu, steam it and douse it with a slightly sweeter soy sauce. It could be squeezed out of a piping bag into a simmering hot pot broth. And it might be the kind of thing youd want to roll into balls, bread and deep-fry.

Eventually Sriram, who cofounded the company two years ago, would like to move beyond ground shrimp meat to produce crab, lobster and a structured deshelled shrimp, one convincing enough to hang off the edge of a glass filled with cocktail sauce.

We can 3-D print the tail if you want, she said.

Singapore has emerged as a leading player in the budding technology once derided as Frankenmeat after Dutch researcher Mark Post unveiled the first test-tube burger to a panel of food critics at a news conference in London seven years ago.

Researchers have been able to drive down the price of the meat, which is called cell cultured meat or clean meat, from the nearly $300,000 it cost to produce Posts debut patty though not enough to actually sell it to the public yet. Shioks shumai, for example, cost $300 apiece.

In whats been described as an edible space race, at least 55 companies worldwide are now involved in developing some variety of cell cultured meat, according to the Good Food Institute, a Washington-based nonprofit advocating alternatives to animal agriculture.

That includes one in Hong Kong that re-creates fish maw or bladder, a delicacy often used in soups; an Australian startup thats growing kangaroo meat; and a company in China thats looking to re-create pork in a country where rising demand for meat will test the limits of the worlds supply. Last year, an Israeli startup successfully grew cow muscle tissue on the International Space Station.

The sciences emergence has provoked existential questions about the provenance of meat, prompting vegans to contemplate whether the technology represents a sort of loophole if it doesnt harm animals, and Jewish and Muslim religious leaders to ponder if the lab-grown pork could be deemed kosher or halal.

Eventually, the technology could allow for novel kinds of meat to be made, presenting chefs with unusual possibilities.

Imagine when you can tailor the taste of any piece of meat, said Ryan Bethencourt, the San Francisco-based cofounder of biotech accelerator IndieBio, who provided Shiok with its initial seed funding. What does pork with salmon fat taste like? What does a mix between Wagyu beef and other heritage beef steak lines taste like? What about meat that tastes both sweet and sour?

Inside the lab at Singapore-based Shiok Meats, where theyre growing shrimp.

(Shiok Meats)

Investors are pouring hundreds of millions into the industry, inspired by the success of plant-based meat companies Beyond Meat and Impossible, which helped demystify alternatives to eating farm animals for a far wider audience than previously thought possible.

Financial backers in the burgeoning field also include giants in the conventional meat industry such as Tyson, Cargill and Bell Food Group. Bill Gates, Richard Branson and Li Ka-shing, one of Hong Kongs richest tycoons, are betting on the meats success as are massive investment funds such as SoftBank and the Singapore governments Temasak.

Cell cultured burgers, chicken tenders and other breakthroughs are still a year or more away from landing in restaurants and grocery stores, experts say, but current events have heightened the urgency to develop more choices for meat.

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed flaws in the conventional meat industry after workers at processing plants in the U.S. and Europe suffered massive outbreaks of the disease and the industrys supply chain buckled under the crisis, leading to shortages, price hikes and purchasing limits.

Critics of conventional meat say the virus provides one more reason to turn away from an industry that has wreaked havoc on the natural environment, served as a vector for infectious diseases like salmonella and E. coli and, through its rampant use of antibiotics on crowded and inhumane factory farms, undermined human health.

But its not entirely clear whether cell cultured meat is safer and healthier. Companies are loathe to share data, choosing instead to operate in secretive silos to protect their intellectual property. Shiok denied a request to view or taste-test its raw product for this story, citing a pending patent. Bethencourt later provided The Times with video of the companys lab-grown shrimp cells under a microscope.

Theyve achieved their objective of making scalable cell-based shrimp, he said.

The environmental benefits of clean meat could be significant. The Good Food Institute estimates cell cultured beef will cut the amount of land used by cattle to produce regular beef by 95% and the amount of emissions by at least 74%.

That could certainly win converts, but its how the meat tastes and feels that will ultimately determine the industrys success.

Not all companies who make this are created equal, said Chase Purdy, an expert on cultured meat and author of Billion Dollar Burger: Inside Big Techs Race for the Future of Food.

Purdy tasted lab-grown foie gras, duck chorizo and ground beef but nothing impressed him more than a chicken tender made by Berkeleys Memphis Meats, with strands of muscle that peeled apart with startling authenticity.

Its really hard to get cells to grow in that linear, structured way, Purdy said.

That might be the exception. Anyone hoping for a facsimile of a dry-aged Porterhouse steak or a loin of Berkshire pork crowned with a sheet of crackling might have to make do with ground meat much easier to replicate for tacos, pasta sauces and burgers for some time.

Re-creating recognizable butcher cuts with complex layers of muscles and fat (think of the patchwork of beef chuck or the mosaic of fat and muscle on the rim of a rib-eye) remains the elusive grail for the industry one thats being tackled by several companies.

Were still at the prototype stage, showing proof of concept and proof of value, said William Chen, the Michael Fam Chair professor and director of food science and technology at Nanyang Technological University Singapore, which is working on growing steak. Think of it as a car. Were able to make a basic sedan. But to make beef steak, we need to build a racing car.

The simplicity of shrimp is what drew Sriram, 35, to the crustacean, which unlike beef, pork or chicken comprises one uniform muscle.

From left, Shiok Meats CTO Ka Yi Ling and CEO Sandhya Sriram.

(Shiok Meats)

Being in Asia was also a plus. Shioks own surveys, and at least one study, suggest Asians are more willing to try novel foods like clean meat than people in the West.

A stem-cell biologist born in India and raised in the Middle East before moving to Singapore, Sriram was thrilled when she realized cell cultured shellfish was an open field.

Asia consumes three-quarters of the worlds supply of shrimp. And the industrys notorious practices, which include slave labor, pollution and the overuse of antibiotics, convinced Sriram there would be a market for an alternative.

Shiok was founded by Sriram and fellow scientist Ka Yi Ling, 32. The pair initially struggled to find private lab space to rent, settling briefly at a marine institute on a mostly secluded island that required careful adherence to a ferry schedule, lest they wanted to stay a night alone on the eerie redoubt.

By 2019, the pair had moved out and developed a prototype that required Sriram, a vegetarian, to eat shrimp for the first time so that she could compare the two.

I could definitely smell and taste the ocean, she said of the creation.

Driving down costs remains the biggest hurdle. Shioks proto-shrimp costs $5,000 a kilogram, which is about $2,268 a pound, mostly due to the price of the nutrient fluids needed to feed the cells. Access to more affordable nutrients has reduced the cost of Shioks meat to $3,500 a kilogram, or about $1,588 a pound. The goal is to make Shioks shrimp 100 times cheaper by the first half of next year.

Unlike the U.S., Singapore has developed regulations for the sale of cultured meat.

The tiny Southeast Asian country, whose entire width is the distance between Burbank and El Segundo, has supported the technology with tax breaks and grants to bolster a government campaign to break the countrys near-total reliance on imported food by 2030.

Singapore is doing more of its own investing and is the most receptive from a regulatory angle to greenlighting this to go to market first, Purdy said. It will likely be a restaurant in Singapore that serves this up to consumers for the first time in history.

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Singapore startup Shiok Meats re-creates shrimp in the lab - Los Angeles Times

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Aqua-Spark Announces an Investment in Singapore-based Shiok Meats, the First Cell-Based Company to Produce Clean, Sustainable, Cruelty-Free Shrimp and…

Tuesday, October 6th, 2020

New York, NY Aqua-Spark(the Fund), the first investment fund focused on sustainable aquaculture, announced an investment inShiok Meats(Shiok), the worlds first cell-based crustacean meat company based in Singapore. Shiok is the first cell-based meat company in South East Asia, and the first and only cell-based meat company working on shrimp. Their flagship product is a highly-anticipated cell-based shrimp, which offers clean, traceable alternatives to the shrimp farming industry.

Aqua-Spark is the lead investor in Shiok Meats $12.6M Series A round, which also includes investments from SEEDS Capital (the investment arm of Enterprise Singapore), Real Tech Fund (Japan), Irongrey (a Global tech investing family office based in Korea), Yellowdog Empowers Fund (South Korea), Ilshin Holdings Pte. Ltd (Singapore), Toyo Seikan Group Holdings, Ltd (Japan),Veg Invest Trust (USA), Makana Ventures (Singapore), AiiM Partners LP (USA), Beyond Impact (Europe), Kelvin Chan Siang Lin (Singapore), and Alex Payne and Nicole Brodeur (USA). The funds will contribute towards building the first-of-its-kind commercial pilot plant from which Shiok plans to launch its minced shrimp product in 2022. This puts Shiok on schedule to become the first company in the world to have a fully functioning commercial pilot plant for cell-based crustacean production.

Mike Velings and Amy Novogratz, co-founders of Aqua-Spark:

The cell-based animal protein industry has been on our radar for some time as once it is at scale it will have an enormous influence on food production efficiency, food safety, and the environment. As our first investment in cell-based seafood, Shiok Meats immediately stood out to us with their strong, female-led team and impressive milestones to-date. While weve invested in a number of technologies working to make shrimp farming more efficient, healthier, and less polluting, Shiok is the first company in our portfolio to focus on shrimp production. We are excited to help shape this novel and innovative industry, which we expect to have a huge impact on the future of seafood, while continuing to support sustainable aquaculture operations, inputs, and innovations across the value chain.

The shrimp market is a $50 billion market globally with Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, and India being the major producers of shrimp. While there are many farms and technologies improving shrimp farming, there is still work to be done. Much of what is currently on the market is raised in crowded factories/farms and treated with antibiotics, chemicals, and hormones. Conventional production processes often contribute to overfishing, excessive bycatch, misrepresentation, and mislabeling as well as contamination with effluents, heavy metals, and microplastics. This form of production is unsustainable and the sector strain will only increase as the population grows. Shiok is addressing this need and disrupting crustacean production to ensure people can eat clean shrimp, crab and lobster from a safe source. Clean meat production could reduce the industrys greenhouse gas emissions by 96 percent, energy consumption by 45 percent, land use by 99 percent, and water consumption by 96 percent.

Shiok Meats was founded in August 2018 by two stem cell scientists, Dr. Sandhya Sriram and Dr. Ka Yi Ling, with over 20 years of combined experience in the muscle, fat, and stem cell biology fields. Shioks mission is to produce clean, healthy, cruelty-free seafood. Their cell-based production process is non-GMO and chemical and antibiotic-free.

Dr. Sandhya Sriram, CEO and co-founder of Shiok Meats:

We are extremely excited to work in partnership with Aqua-Spark as we develop cell-based seafood and meats that are contributing towards a cleaner and healthier seafood industry and solving for the inefficiencies around global protein production. Aqua-Spark was the perfect partner to lead our Series A because they care deeply about funding companies that address planetary health and food security. With their help, we hope to become the global leader in cell-based crustaceans and seafood. We are pleased that Aqua-Spark supports our global impact vision and will be with us for the long haul.

Shiok stands out from other cell-based meat production companies because of their proprietary technology that isolates stem cells from shrimp, lobster, and crabthey are the first company to be able to do this for cell-based production at the moment. Once the stem cells are harvested, the shrimp, lobster, and crab meats are grown in nutrient-rich conditions, similar to that of a greenhouse. After four-to-six weeks, the cell-based seafood is exactly the same as its conventional counterpart but more sustainable, clean, and nutritious. Shioks patent-pending technology can grow crustaceans four times faster than conventional production.

The output of Shioks pilot plant will be frozen cell-based shrimp meat for dumplings and other shrimp-based dishes. Beyond cell-based shrimp, Shiok plans to launch shrimp flavouring paste and powder, fully-formed 3D shrimp, and cell-based lobster and crab products in the coming years.

To date, Aqua-Spark has now invested in 20 complementary companies, technologies, and inputs that are working toward the sustainable production of aquatic life.

About Aqua-Spark

Launched in 2011, Aqua-Spark is an investment fund with a mission to transform the global aquaculture industry into one that is healthier, more sustainable, and more accessible. They invest in aquaculture companies across the value chainspanning farming operations, alternative feed ingredients, disease-battling technology, and consumer-facing aquaculture products. These companies are solving some of the industrys big challenges while bringing returns that are comparable to todays traditional industry. The portfolio works as an ecosystem, with the companies agreeing to collaborate on optimal solutions, and working together toward this shared vision of a more efficient global aquaculture industry.

Since 2015, the fund has invested in 20 complementary SMEs. Thus far, Aqua-Spark has EUR 152 million in assets under management, dedicated to investments in elements of the aquaculture industry that will make fish farming sustainable. The goal of the fund is to ultimately make sustainability widespread and profitable enough that it becomes the only way to farm fish.

About Shiok Meats

Shiok Meats is a cell-based, clean meat company. It is the first of its kind in Singapore and South-East Asia with a mission to deliver delicious, clean, and healthy seafood by harvesting from cells instead of animals. Shiok Meats is working to bring cell-based crustacean meats (shrimp, crab, lobster) to the kitchen. Their meats are cruelty-free, healthy, and better for the environment with the same taste and texture and more nutrients than their traditional counterparts.

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Aqua-Spark Announces an Investment in Singapore-based Shiok Meats, the First Cell-Based Company to Produce Clean, Sustainable, Cruelty-Free Shrimp and...

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Orgenesis to acquire regenerative medicine company Koligo Therapeutics – Pharmaceutical Business Review

Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

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Heart attack patches may save lives in US and beyond – Galveston County Daily News

Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

A promising therapy for heart attacks uses stem cells to repair the damaged areas of the heart. However, getting the transplanted cells to stay at the site is a challenge. Now scientists have created a new type of off-the-shelf cardiac patch that overcomes these limitations.

The leading cause of death in the United States is coronary heart disease, which kills about 360,000 per year. Heart attacks result from the loss of blood flow to part of the heart muscle. This can be caused by fat, cholesterol and other substances forming plaque in the coronary arteries that supply oxygenated blood to the heart.

When the plaque breaks, a clot forms around it, which can prevent blood flow to a part of the heart and kill cells. The degree of damage depends on the area of the heart supplied by the blocked artery.

Treatments for a heart attack include limiting the original damage and blocking the secondary damage, which reduces long-term consequences and saves lives. As the heart heals, the damaged area forms scar tissue, which cannot pump blood like normal heart tissue, and it can affect the performance of the rest of the heart.

Cell therapy for heart attacks involves using cardiac stromal cells to encourage the heart to heal with muscle cells rather than scar tissue. Cardiac stromal cells interact with muscle cells and release chemical signals to encourage muscle cell growth.

This approach has only moderate benefits, because cardiac stromal cells are fragile and must be carefully stored and transported. Making matters worse, some stem cells can grow out of control and become tumors. Using a patients own cells has some advantages, but its expensive and time consuming. Theres also the problem of preventing the beating heart from washing the cells away.

Several types of scaffolds have been developed to keep the cardiac stromal cells at the proper location. However, these scaffolds dont overcome the cost and difficulties of isolating and expanding the stem cells.

Now a group of scientists has created a new type of artificial cardiac patch. It consists of a scaffolding matrix made from pig cardiac tissue, from which all cells have been removed. They then created artificial cardiac stromal cells by putting the important healing components from cardiac stromal cells into biodegradable microparticles within that matrix. The synthetic cardiac stromal cells mimic the therapeutic features of live stem cells while overcoming their storage and survival problems, and the matrix preserves the structures and activity found in cardiac tissue.

The artificial cardiac patch was shown to hold the synthetic cardiac stromal cells in place on the heart. In heart attack experiments in both rodents and pigs, the patch resulted in a 50 percent improvement in heart function and a 30 percent reduction in scarring when compared to no treatment.

Medical Discovery News is hosted by professors Norbert Herzog at Quinnipiac University, and David Niesel of the University of Texas Medical Branch. Learn more at http://www.medicaldiscoverynews.com.

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Orgenesis Announces Agreement to Acquire Koligo Therapeutics, a Leader in Personalized Cell Therapies – GlobeNewswire

Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

Acquisition to support accelerated commercialization of Koligos KYSLECEL,a personalized islet cell therapy available in the U.S. for chronic and recurrent acute pancreatitis

Goal to rapidly advance KT-PC-301, an autologous cell therapy under investigationfor the treatment of COVID-19-related Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome (ARDS)

Orgenesis to leverage Koligos 3D-V bioprinting technology across its POCare Platform

GERMANTOWN, Md., Sept. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Orgenesis Inc. (NASDAQ: ORGS) (Orgenesis or the Company), a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of cell and gene therapies, and Koligo Therapeutics, Inc. (Koligo), a regenerative medicine company, today announced that the two companies have entered into a definitive merger agreement, subject to final closing conditions, with expected completion before year-end (Transaction).

Koligo is a leader in developing personalized cell therapies utilizing the patients own (autologous) cells. Koligo has successfully launched its first commercial product, KYSLECEL, and plans to commence a phase 2 trial of KT-PC-301 for COVID-19-related ARDS. Koligos development stage technology utilizes 3D bioprinting and vascularization with autologous cells (3D-V technology) to create biodegradable and shelf-stable three-dimensional cell and tissue implants. The 3D-V technology is being developed for diabetes and pancreatitis, with longer term applications for neural, liver, and other cell/tissue transplants.

Following closing of the Transaction, Orgenesis plans to accelerate the commercial scaleup of KYSLECEL throughout the United States and, subject to regulatory and logistical considerations, in international markets as well. After closing of the Transaction, and subject to FDA review and clearance of the Companys Investigational New Drug application, Orgenesis expects to start patient recruitment for a phase 2 randomized clinical trial of KT-PC-301 in COVID-19 patients. Orgenesis also plans to leverage Koligos 3D-V bioprinting technology across its POCare platform.

Under the terms of the merger agreement, Orgenesis will acquire all of the outstanding stock of Koligo from its shareholders (the founders and staff of Koligo and a subsidiary of Bergen Special Opportunity Fund, LP, an institutional investor managed by Bergen Asset Management, LLC). The agreed consideration terms are an aggregate of $15 million in shares of Orgenesis common stock valued at $7.00 per share which shall be issued to Koligos accredited investors (with certain non-accredited investors to be paid solely in cash) and an assumption of $1.3 million in Koligos liabilities, estimated to be substantially all of Koligos liabilities. Additional details of the Transaction will be available in the Companys Form 8-K, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and will be available at http://www.sec.gov.

KYSLECELKoligos KYSLECEL is commercially available in the United States for chronic and recurrent acute pancreatitis in a surgical procedure commonly called Total Pancreatectomy with Islet Autologous-Transplant (TPIAT). TPIAT has been proven to provide significant pain relief, improved quality of life, and a reduction in the need for pain medication for patients suffering from chronic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. KYSLECEL infusion after a total pancreatectomy helps preserve insulin secretory capacity and reduce the risk of diabetic complications. KYSLECEL is made from a patients own pancreatic islets the cells that make insulin to regulate blood sugar.

Koligo has commenced its commercial pilot program for KYSLECEL at six U.S. hospitals, treating 40 patients to date. The KYSLECEL pilot program has generated approximately $2 million in sales revenue. KYSLECEL has also been shown to result in significant savings to payors over traditional chronic pancreatitis management. Following the closing of the Transaction, Orgenesis plans to make KYSLECEL available to an increasing number of hospitals throughout the United States through its POCare Network.

KT-PC-301Koligos lead clinical development program is for KT-PC-301, an autologous cell therapy under investigation for the treatment of COVID-19-related Acute Respiratory Disease Syndrome (ARDS). KT-PC-301 is comprised of autologous stromal and vascular fraction cells (SVF) derived from each patients adipose (fat) tissue. KT-PC-301 contains a population of mesenchymal stem cells, vascular endothelial cells, and immune cells which migrate to the patients lungs and other peripheral sites of inflammation. Nonclinical and clinical evidence demonstrate that KT-PC-301 may: (1) stabilize microcirculation to improve oxygenation; (2) maintain T and B lymphocytes to support antibody production; and (3) induce an anti-inflammatory effect.

Koligo has completed a pre-IND (Investigational New Drug) consultation with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start clinical trials of KT-PC-301 in COVID-19-related ARDS. Following the closing of the Transaction, and subject to FDA review and clearance of the Companys Investigational New Drug application, Orgenesis expects to start patient recruitment for a phase 2 randomized clinical trial of KT-PC-301 in COVID-19 patients. As currently planned, the phase 2 trial is expected to enroll 75 patients and evaluate the safety and efficacy of KT-PC-301. Mohamed Saad, MD, Chief of Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Disorders Medicine at the University of Louisville, will be the lead clinical investigator on the trial.

3D-V Technology Koligos 3D-V bioprinting technology is designed to support development of a number of product candidates for the treatment of diabetes, cancer, neurodegenerative disease, and other serious diseases. The 3D-V technology platform is able to print three-dimensional cell and tissue constructs with a vascular network. Key benefits of the 3D-V approach include: faster revascularization/inosculation of cell/tissue transplant to improve engraftment; host tolerance of the graft while minimizing need for immune suppressive drugs; better site of transplant administration of such products; and scaffolding to keep cell/tissue in place in vivo. These solutions are ideally suited for islet transplant and other cell/tissue transplant applications.

Koligo ManagementFollowing the closing of the Transaction, Koligos management team will be joining Orgenesis to continue commercial and development activities. Koligos CEO, Matthew Lehman, is an accomplished executive in the biotech and regenerative medicine fields. Prior to co-founding Koligo, he was CEO of Prima Biomed Ltd (now Immutep Ltd, a Nasdaq (IMMP) and ASX (IMM) listed biotech company). Stuart Williams, PhD, Chief Technology Officer, is a bioengineer and thought leader in regenerative medicine, with over 300 publications and 20 issued patents in the field. Dr. Williams has co-founded three other biotech companies and is an experienced academic-industry collaborator. Michael Hughes, MD, Chief Medical Officer, is a transplant surgeon who started the islet transplant program at University of Louisville which was the genesis of Koligos KYSLECEL program. He has successfully treated nearly 50 chronic pancreatitis patients with islet autologous transplant after pancreatectomy. Balamurugan Appakalai, PhD, has more than 20 years of islet isolation experience, having processed more than 800 human pancreases. He is a leader in the field of islet transplant with 100+ publications.

Vered Caplan, Chief Executive Officer of Orgenesis, stated, We are pleased to announce this transformative acquisition, which we expect will add broad capabilities to our therapeutic and technology platform, and will further our leadership in the cell and gene therapy field. Based on several phase 1 studies, Koligos KT-PC-301, using a patients own cells, has demonstrated safety and tolerability, and has shown signs of efficacy to support continued development in COVID-19-related ARDS. If successful for the treatment of COVID-19-related ARDS, KT-PC-301 is likely to have applications in other acute and chronic respiratory indications, areas that represent significant unmet medical need. In addition, we see significant potential in KYSLECEL, a commercial stage asset for the treatment of chronic and acute recurrent pancreatitis, which we plan to introduce through our global network of hospitals. Finally, Koligos 3D-V bioprinting technology is highly complementary to our POCare Platform, as we implement new technologies to improve efficacy and lower the costs of cell and gene therapies. I would like to personally welcome Matthew and the rest of the Koligo team to the Orgenesis organization when the Transaction closes. We believe that their skills and experience will be an important addition as we execute on our strategy to unlock the power of cell and gene therapies and make them accessible to all.

Matthew Lehman, Chief Executive Officer of Koligo Therapeutics, stated, The merger with Orgenesis marks a major milestone for our company and builds on our recent progress, including the Pre-IND package submitted to the U.S. FDA for KT-PC-301 and our pilot commercial program for KYSLECEL. The Orgenesis team brings extensive clinical, regulatory, and manufacturing expertise well suited to supporting Koligos goals. Orgenesis intellectual property is highly complementary to Koligos technology and the combined companies will work to advance a robust commercial and development product portfolio. Orgenesis POCare technologies are also ideally suited for low-cost and efficient production of autologous cell therapies at the point of care, which we believe will considerably enhance the delivery of these therapies to patients. Additionally, we believe Orgenesis global network of leading hospitals and healthcare institutions will enable us to accelerate the commercial rollout of KYSLECEL. We are quite encouraged by the outlook for the business and look forward to leveraging Orgenesis POCare Platform in order to accelerate the timeline to bringing our innovative cell therapies to market. Through this merger, we believe we can maximize value for all shareholders and we are grateful to Orgenesis for this opportunity.

Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer Baratz LLP and KPMG advised Orgenesis on the Transaction. Maxim Group LLC acted as a finder and Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP advised Koligo on the Transaction.

About Koligo Therapeutics Koligo Therapeutics, Inc. is a US regenerative medicine company. Koligos first commercial product is KYSLECEL (autologous pancreatic islets) for chronic and acute recurrent pancreatitis. Koligos 3D-V technology platform incorporates the use of advanced 3D bioprinting techniques and vascular endothelial cells to support development of transformational cell and tissue products for serious diseases. More information is available at http://www.koligo.net.

About OrgenesisOrgenesis is a global biotech company working to unlock the full potential of celland gene therapies (CGTs) in an affordable and accessible format at the point of care. The Orgenesis POCarePlatform is comprised of three enabling components: a pipeline of licensedPOCare Therapeuticsthat are processed and produced in closed, automatedPOCare Technologysystems across a collaborativePOCare Network. Orgenesisidentifies promising new therapies and leverages its POCare Platform to provide a rapid, globally harmonized pathway for these therapies to reach and treat large numbers of patients at lowered costs through efficient, scalable, and decentralized production. The Network brings together patients, doctors, industry partners, research institutes and hospitals worldwide to achieve harmonized, regulated clinical development and production of the therapies. Learn more about the work Orgenesis is doing atwww.orgenesis.com.

Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements The information in this release is as of September 29, 2020. Orgenesis assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements contained in this release as a result of new information or future events or developments. This release contains forward looking statements about Orgenesis, Koligo, Koligos technology, and potential development and business opportunities of Koligo and Orgenesis following the closing of the Transaction, each of which involve substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. Risks and uncertainties include, among other things, uncertainties regarding the commercial success of the Companys products; the uncertainties inherent in research and development, including the ability to meet anticipated clinical endpoints, commencement and/or completion dates for our clinical trials, regulatory submission dates, regulatory approval dates and/or launch dates, as well as the possibility of unfavorable new clinical data and further analyses of existing clinical data; the risk that clinical trial data are subject to differing interpretations and assessments by regulatory authorities; whether regulatory authorities will be satisfied with the design of and results from our clinical studies; whether and when any such regulatory authorities may approved the Companys development products, and, if approved, whether such product candidates will be commercially successful; decisions by regulatory authorities impacting labeling, manufacturing processes, safety and/or other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of the Companys products; uncertainties regarding the impact of COVID-19 on the Companys business, operations and financial results and competitive developments.

A further description of risks and uncertainties can be found in the Companys Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 and in its subsequent reports on Form 10-Q, including in the sections thereof captioned Risk Factors and Forward-Looking Information, as well as in its subsequent reports on Form 8-K, all of which are filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and available at http://www.sec.gov.

Contact for Orgenesis:Crescendo Communications, LLCTel: 212-671-1021ORGS@crescendo-ir.com

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Bariatric surgery is booming, as obese patients worry about their Covid-19 risks – The Daily Briefing

Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

Bariatric surgery, a significantly underutilized treatment for weight management, is beginning to see an uptick in usea trend spurred by a somewhat unlikely cause: the novel coronavirus epidemic.

The 3 most important considerations for patients deciding on bariatric surgery

According to the New York Times' "Well," bariatric surgery is an increasingly safe, effective, and simple procedure available to patients with a BMI of at least 40 who cannot lose weight via diet and exercise alone, as well as patients with BMIs between 30 to 35 who have obesity-related health issues.

Bariatric surgeriesincluding gastric bypasses, laparoscopic bands, and gastric sleeveswork by reducing the physical size of the stomach and curbing appetite by altering the hormonal signals between a patient's stomach and brain. Bariatric surgery, according to "Well," has become increasingly safe over the years, with the rates of complications and deaths related to such procedures plunging from a peak of 11.7% and 1%, respectively, in 1998 to 1.4% and 0.04% in 2016.

However, despite the safety and efficacy of the procedure, experts say it's significantly underutilized. "Only one-half of 1 percent of people eligible for bariatric surgery currently undergo it," Anne Ehlers, a bariatric surgeon at the University of Michigan, said.

According to a JAMA article, this under-use of bariatric surgery likely stems both from "the reluctance of the medical community and patients to accept surgery as a safe, effective, and durable treatment of obesity," and because patients worry that they "may be judged by others for taking the easy way out and not having the willpower to diet and exercise."

According to the Wall Street Journal, several studies have found a link between obesity and its related health issuessuch as diabetes and hypertensionand increased rates of serious Covid-19 infection. In fact, CDC this month confirmed that new research demonstrates that Covid-19 patients who are obese have a greater risk of severe outcomes.

Researchers think this increased risk for obese patients may stem in part because of how the coronavirus enters the body via an enzyme called the ACE2 receptor. This enzyme is located in cells that line the lungs and fat tissue, which means that patients with excess weight may be more likely to experience a high viral load. In addition, obesity is linked to hyperinflammation and shortness of breath, two conditions that make it more difficult for someone to combat viral infection.

As John Morton, head of the bariatric practice at Yale Medical Center, said, "The virus frankly has an easier job" replicating itself among patients who are obese, because "[i]t has more targets."

But ongoing research indicates that losing weightand losing weight via bariatric surgery in particularmay help lower this risk, the Journal reports. According to a clinical study from the Cleveland Clinic that's currently under peer review, patients with obesity who've had bariatric surgery were 25% less likely to require hospitalization after contracting Covid-19 when compared with obese patients who have not had the surgery. In addition, among those patients in the study who were hospitalized, none of those who've had bariatric surgery were admitted to the ICU or died from the pathogencompared with 13% and 2.5%, respectively, of hospitalized patients who have not had the surgery.

In light of this increased risk, some patients who are struggling with their weight are undergoing bariatric surgery as a proactive measure against severe infectiona trend that seems to have made bariatric surgery more popular than ever, the Journal reports.

In fact, while most scheduled procedures are now experiencing a rebound after several months' pause amid the epidemic, bariatric surgery is not only rebounding more quickly than other services, but it's surpassing even its 2019 levels. Specifically, according to research from health care data company Perception Health, claims for bariatric surgery fell to nearly zero in April, but then rebounded by June to a higher level than that same month in 2019.

Separately, Optum, which owns medical facilities and surgical centers across the country, reported a 26% annual increase in patients joining bariatric-surgery programs this summer. (The Daily Briefing is published by Advisory Board, a division of Optum.) Similarly, Cigna said that while prior authorizations for bariatric surgeries declined 38.8% annually between March and May of this year, they increased 9.3% annually in June, July, and August.

The leaders of various surgical practices at major hospitals have reported similar anecdotal evidence, according to the Journal. For instance, Morton said that after Yale reopened its five hospitals for scheduled surgeries in June, bariatric surgery volume increased 20% when compared to 2019 levelsand inquiries about the procedure are also on the rise. "The only two surgeries that have been Covid-proof have been cancer and bariatric," he said.

Similarly, Ali Aminian, director of the Cleveland Clinic's Bariatric and Metabolic Institute, said intake for severely obese patients seeking bariatric surgery increased 40% annually over the summer. "We've had patients who wanted to come and take care of their obesity, to be healthier, and when we ask them, why did you come now? It's because they've heard this message that it's a risk factor for Covid infection," Aminian said.

And speaking as a bariatric surgery patient, Eliza Henderson said the coronavirus spurred her to "take the plunge" and schedule herself for the procedure later this month. "I don't want my being obese to stack the odds against me with something like coronavirus," Henderson explained. "More than anything, I want to have a better chance to survive" (Whelan, Wall Street Journal, 9/28; Brody, "Well," New York Times, 9/28).

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Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market- Industry Analysis and Forecast (2020-2027) – Unica News

Wednesday, September 30th, 2020

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Marketwas valued US$ XX Mn in 2019 and is expected to reach US$ XX Mn by 2027, at a CAGR of 24.5% during a forecast period.

Market Dynamics

The Research Report gives an in-depth account of the drivers and restraints in the stem cell reconstructive market. Stem cell reconstructive surgery includes the treatment of injured or dented part of body. Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells, which divide to produce more stem cells. Growing reconstructive surgeries led by the rising number of limbs elimination and implants and accidents are boosting the growth in the stem cell reconstructive market. Additionally, rising number of aged population, number of patients suffering from chronic diseases, and unceasing development in the technology, these are factors which promoting the growth of the stem cell reconstructive market. Stem cell reconstructive is a procedure containing the use of a patients own adipose tissue to rise the fat volume in the area of reconstruction and therefore helping 3Dimentional reconstruction in patients who have experienced a trauma or in a post-surgical event such as a mastectomy or lumpectomy, brain surgery, or reconstructive surgery as a result of an accident or injury. Stem cell reconstructive surgeries are also used in plastic or cosmetic surgeries as well. Stem cell and regenerative therapies gives many opportunities for development in the practice of medicine and the possibility of an array of novel treatment options for patients experiencing a variety of symptoms and conditions. Stem cell therapy, also recognised as regenerative medicine, promotes the repair response of diseased, dysfunctional or injured tissue using stem cells or their derivatives.

The common guarantee of all the undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs), foetal, amniotic, UCB, and adult stem cell types is their indefinite self-renewal capacity and high multilineage differentiation potential that confer them a primitive and dynamic role throughout the developmental process and the lifespan in adult mammal.However, the high expenditure of stem cell reconstructive surgeries and strict regulatory approvals are restraining the market growth.

The report study has analyzed revenue impact of covid-19 pandemic on the sales revenue of market leaders, market followers and disrupters in the report and same is reflected in our analysis.

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market Segment analysis

Based on Cell Type, the embryonic stem cells segment is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% during the forecast period. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), derived from the blastocyst stage of early mammalian embryos, are distinguished by their capability to distinguish into any embryonic cell type and by their ability to self-renew. Owing to their plasticity and potentially limitless capacity for self-renewal, embryonic stem cell therapies have been suggested for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Additionally, their potential in regenerative medicine, embryonic stem cells provide a possible another source of tissue/organs which serves as a possible solution to the donor shortage dilemma. Researchers have differentiated ESCs into dopamine-producing cells with the hope that these neurons could be used in the treatment of Parkinsons disease. Upsurge occurrence of cardiac and malignant diseases is promoting the segment growth. Rapid developments in this vertical contain protocols for directed differentiation, defined culture systems, demonstration of applications in drug screening, establishment of several disease models, and evaluation of therapeutic potential in treating incurable diseases.

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market Regional analysis

The North American region has dominated the market with US$ XX Mn. America accounts for the largest and fastest-growing market of stem cell reconstructive because of the huge patient population and well-built healthcare sector. Americas stem cell reconstructive market is segmented into two major regions such as North America and South America. More than 80% of the market is shared by North America due to the presence of the US and Canada.

Europe accounts for the second-largest market which is followed by the Asia Pacific. Germany and UK account for the major share in the European market due to government support for research and development, well-developed technology and high healthcare expenditure have fuelled the growth of the market. This growing occurrence of cancer and diabetes in America is the main boosting factor for the growth of this market.

The objective of the report is to present a comprehensive analysis of the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market including all the stakeholders of the industry. The past and current status of the industry with forecasted market size and trends are presented in the report with the analysis of complicated data in simple language. The report covers all the aspects of the industry with a dedicated study of key players that includes market leaders, followers and new entrants. PORTER, SVOR, PESTEL analysis with the potential impact of micro-economic factors of the market has been presented in the report. External as well as internal factors that are supposed to affect the business positively or negatively have been analysed, which will give a clear futuristic view of the industry to the decision-makers.

The report also helps in understanding Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market dynamics, structure by analysing the market segments and projects the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market size. Clear representation of competitive analysis of key players by Application, price, financial position, Product portfolio, growth strategies, and regional presence in the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market make the report investors guide.Scope of the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Sources

Allogeneic Autologouso Bone Marrowo Adipose Tissueo Blood Syngeneic OtherGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Cell Type

Embryonic Stem Cell Adult Stem CellGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Application

Cancer Diabetes Traumatic Skin Defect Severe Burn OtherGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By End-User

Hospitals Research Institute OthersGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Regions

North America Europe Asia-Pacific South America Middle East and Africa (MEA)Key Players operating the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market

Osiris Therapeutics NuVasives Cytori Therapeutics Takeda (TiGenix) Cynata Celyad Medi-post Anterogen Molmed Baxter Eleveflow Mesoblast Ltd. Micronit Microfluidics TAKARA BIO INC. Tigenix Capricor Therapeutics Astellas Pharma US, Inc. Pfizer Inc. STEMCELL Technologies Inc.

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Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market- Industry Analysis and Forecast (2020-2027) - Unica News

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Regenerative medicine and war: The next breakthrough in treating injured veterans? – Genetic Literacy Project

Tuesday, September 29th, 2020

Many Americans, and indeed people all over the world, were outraged when reports surfaced this past summer that President Trump had once dismissed the dead soldiers from one of World War Is iconic battles, The Battle of Belleau Wood, as suckers and losers. Amputees should be excluded from parades because nobody wants to see them, the article also reports he had said.

The president denied these claims, but the outcry highlighted the high regard in which the American public, and most of the world, holds veterans; people are united by the pride and respect for those brave enough to risk life and limb for their country.

In the United States, the number of injured soldiers returning home alive has risen from 75% to 92% since the Vietnam War, but combat takes a toll on the survivors. Its estimated that one in every 10 veterans alive today was injured seriously while serving. And, for many, the nature of the injury makes treatment very difficult. Soldiers can find themselves returning home with severe burns, spinal cord injuries, paralysis, blindness, deafness, brain injuries and loss of limbs, as well as psychological trauma, some linked directly to physical injuries.

The most significant development in recent years for severely maimed veterans and other victims of physical injuries is the acceleration of whats known as regenerative medicine. Regenerative medicine was first defined in 1999 and it encompasses many disciplines of science. Its goal is to provide clinicians with the tools to effectively repair or replace a patients damaged tissues and organs in order to return normal function.

The technology really emerged into the public consciousness in the 2000s because of the Iraq war and, since then, great strides have been made in applying it to treating many different healthcare issues. So, what about the specifics? What are the most promising breakthroughs in recent years?

Some of the most challenging war-related injuries involve bones. Severe burns, spinal cord injuries, blast injuries, traumatic brain injuriesthese seemingly disparate traumas can each lead to a painful complication during the healing process called heterotopic ossification (HO).

A team at Michigan Medicines Department of Surgery is focusing its research on how the healing process often goes awry. The problem often emerges at limb amputation sites. Weeks after surgery or injury, abnormal bones often form within soft tissues like muscleplaces where theyre not supposed to be, causing the patient agonizing pain.

Theres no way to prevent it and once its formed, theres no way to reverse it, said Benjamin Levi, M.D, co-head of the research team at the Center for Basic and Translational Research at Michigan Medicines Department of Surgery.

There may be a solution thanks to a collaborative study between Levi and a research group led by Stephen Kunkel, Ph.D. at Michigans Department of Pathology. It had been theorized that HO could be linked to inflammation at the site of injury or surgery. The researchers built on this theory by studying the cells that are present at the early stages of HO.

Working with mice, they have been able to identify a specific protein that is responsible for sending the signals that trigger stem cells within the bone to start this process of uncontrolled tissue growth. By targeting this protein and stopping its action, it could be possible to stop the process in the first place. This would improve the quality of life for many injured veterans.

Treating HO is very much a case of prevention being better than cure. Progressing this discovery into a therapeutic setting could eventually provide doctors with a mechanism to stop HO before it has a chance to develop. It would be a game changer for many veterans who would otherwise be left with this agonizing condition.

Severe blast injuries and bullet traumas also leave many veterans needing implants or prosthetics to replace bone that has been lost to severe injury. If you break a leg, a doctor will put it in a cast and allow the natural healing process to occur. If its a severe break, you may need surgery. But when a soldiers bone is ripped apart by a gunshot or a blast, the damage to the network of cells within the bone is so severe that it often cannot heal on its own.

Regenerative medicine may provide a solution. After leaving the US Army more than 20 years ago, solider Luis Alvarez founded a firm at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that developed a paint derived from key proteins that can trigger bone regeneration. The inspiration behind Alvarezs innovation?

During my time in Iraq, I witnessed service members who suffered traumatic injuries undergo amputations weeks or months after the initial wound, because there was no reliable method for regenerating the bone.

The technology developed by his company allows doctors to coat implants with specific proteins, allowing them to trigger regeneration, thus aiding recovery of the damaged tissue. They are making great progress and looking to have something ready for doctors to use in clinics by 2021. Its an inspiring story. The company is rolling out multiple therapies heading into clinical trials over the next two years.

The military is also starting to invest heavily in one of the most exciting avenues of regenerative medicine to help veterans replace lost tissue. Bioprinting uses human cells mixed with specially designed bioinks to 3D print tissue-like structures for the purpose of regenerating damaged body parts. Using bioprinting, scientists can build replacement grafts using a patients own stem cells, thus removing the issues associated with transplant rejection. The technology is still in its infancy but, thanks to recent military investment, scientists are now applying bioprinting to the generation of skin grafts to treat the severe burns that many veterans are afflicted with.

Treating severe burns is an incredibly difficult process and many rarely heal completely. Patients can be left with extreme scarring, tight and itchy skin and disfigurement. When the skin is severely burned the body focuses on preventing infection by closing the wound as quickly as possible. New skin is generated but the structure is vastly different to normal tissue.

A 5-year research project led by Prof Jeff Biernaskie at the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine has made a big step forward.

What weve shown is that you can alter the wound environment with drugs, or modify the genetics of these progenitor cells directly, and both are sufficient to change their behaviour during wound healing. And that can have really quite impressive effects on healing that includes regeneration of new hair follicles, glands and fat within the wounded skin.

This research could lead to new drugs that greatly improve the healing process.

It is clear from the number of veterans currently coping with a compromised quality of life that we need to do more to treat their injuries. It is estimated that the number of veterans currently living with these life changing injuries is in the millions and their healthcare needs come at an immense economic cost. Fortunately, there is now a much stronger horse in the race to a cure.

Regenerative medicine was estimated to draw nearly $15 billion in investments in 2017. That figure is predicted to rise to in excess of $79 billion by 2026. Those are serious resources, providing hope that our veterans will benefit in the decade ahead.

Sam Moxon has a PhD in regenerative medicine and is currently involved in dementia research. He is a freelance writer with an interest in the development of new technologies to diagnose and treat degenerative diseases. Follow him on Twitter@DrSamMoxon

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Regenerative medicine and war: The next breakthrough in treating injured veterans? - Genetic Literacy Project

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Sherrie Hewson celebrates 70th birthday with second face lift to transform her looks – The Sun

Tuesday, September 15th, 2020

SHERRIE Hewson wants to "live every day to the max" including celebrating her 70th birthday with a second facelift.

The Coronation Street actress learnt the important lesson after she lost her brother, Brett Hutchinson, 71, died from a brain tumour earlier this year.

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Brett died in April leaving Sherrie "completely broken", especially because she couldn't visit him due to the coronavirus lockdown.

She admitted she still does not feel "very strong" after losing her brother.

"Whenever I hear any Motown music, which he loved, I just cry. The pain is so terrible, my heart is broken," she told the Mirror.

"Now I look at my life and think, Hang on a minute, what have I got, how long have I got?

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I mean, look at my brother. Two years ago he was the healthiest thing on this planet.

So none of us know whats going to happen."

Sherrie explained that unknown in life is what inspires her to "be healthy and well for my grandchildren".

I wish I had planned more when I was younger. Instead I just went steaming ahead, thinking I was going to live forever," the actress explained.

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Brett was only a couple of years older than me, so as I go into my seventies his death has made me want to live every day to the max."

One thing she decided to do was to get some cosmetic surgery for a "boost".

Sherrie opted for a love handle facelift (LHF) which involves fat from around the hips and stomach and stomach area.

Doctors then combine that fat blood, to encourage stem cells to be released from the fat.

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The LHF was a quick treatment and its given me such a boost. I feel like its rejuvenated my skin and restored all the volume its natural looking with no cutting, and it was all done in under an hour," Sherrie explained.

I absolutely love the results.

She added: I had a facelift when I was 50 and Ive had bits and bobs done throughout the years a bit of botox and filler. But I havent had anything done for a long time now.

But as I approached 70. I just thought, What will I do for myself at this age? I thought I would give myself a last kind of boost so I can look in the mirror and think, Youre not bad for your age."

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Sherrie admitted the facelift from the Harley Street Skin Clinic would help her "give myself a lift after all the stuff I have been through, particularly in the last 18 months".

I need to give my self-confidence and self-worth a big kick up the a**e so can I feel good about myself and hold my head up high, she said.

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Sherrie has opened up previously about how she believed her brother had coronavirus when he died.

She's convinced that coronavirus played a part in his sudden downturn after he was diagnosed with grade 4 glioblastoma the most common and aggressive brain tumour in adults.

"Ill always believe that Covid had something to do with his, they call it pneumonia but I dont believe that," she said.

"Controversially I believe that thats what it was called but no one, you cant prove things, the sadness and the pain was too big to carry on and create a fuss."

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Sherrie Hewson celebrates 70th birthday with second face lift to transform her looks - The Sun

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Two Austin Women Hope to Build the First Lab-Grown Brisket – Texas Monthly

Tuesday, September 15th, 2020

Katie Kam hasnt eaten brisket since 1996. Or was it 1997? She was working a high school job at the now-shuttered BBs Smokehouse, in Northwest Austin, prior to that, but Kam has been a vegan for so long that the exact date of her last smoked meat meal is hard to pinpoint. Shes hoping to get her next bite about three years from now. Thats when Kam expects BioBQ, the company she started with cofounder Janet Zoldan in late 2018, will harvest its first lab-grown brisket. Kam and Zoldan want the worlds first lab-grown barbecue to be produced or, as they describe it, cultivated, in Austin.

Kam is an Austin native who holds degrees in chemistry and biology as well as a doctoral degree in civil engineering. A few years ago, she was seeking a new design challenge, and several articles about meat grown from animal cells piqued her interest. She reached out to the biomedical engineering department at the University of Texas seeking yet another degree, this one based on the study of cell-based meat production. Zoldan, an associate professor in cellular and biomolecular engineering, brought her in for a meeting and persuaded her to pursue a business rather than another PhD. Zoldan was already working with cardiovascular tissue engineering using human stem cells. She had designed a thermo-sensitive scaffolding system, a sort of framework, for the cells to grow upon, and thought it would translate well into growing bovine cells. The end application is a little bit different, but the route to it is very similar, Zoldan tells me.

The framework was only the beginning. Theyll need to design each component of a brisket separately, like the lean muscle, the fat, and the collagen. Kam has been reading meat science studies about the brisket structure theyre trying to replicate. The components will need to be grown alongside one another and intertwine to mimic the structure of a brisket. Thats a challenge, Kam says, that most lab-grown meat projects wont encounter because they focus on ground meat like burgers and chicken nuggetsfood that has no texture and orientation, unlike brisket, adds Zoldan.

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Then theres the flavor. From a functional perspective, the fat they design for the brisket will need to provide moisture and a pleasing texture, but it also has to contain the proper beefy flavor. Theyll seek help from food scientists to create the flavor, but as a vegan, Kam wont be able test it against a standard brisket from a steer. When I ask her about this, Zoldan chimes in. Its okay. Im here. Im a carnivore.

And that demonstrates the odd duality of a product like BioBQ. It is not to be confused with the Impossible Burger or other plant-based meats. This will be meat-based meat, which is grown from bovine cells harvested via biopsy. The fact that theyll produce real meat is the whole point. Kams mission isnt to persuade omnivores to adapt to her vegan diet, but rather to provide them a beef option that doesnt require animal slaughter. No animal had to die for this, she explains, which is why she feels that eating BioBQ wont compromise her vegan principles.

One other problem with the ethics of lab-grown meat is that current technology relies on fetal bovine serum (FBS), which is harvested from cow fetuses in the slaughterhouse. A vegan product it most certainly is not, but it has no peer when it comes to cell growth promotion in a lab environment. Kam said there is research being done on FBS replacements, which they plan to use. We are committed to testing and using alternatives to FBS, Kam says, even if those alternatives are not as efficient as FBS by the time theyre ready to begin cultivation. She adds, In addition to the animal welfare issues associated with FBS, FBS is not a sustainable resource and is not affordable.

Putting aside Kams ethical issues with meat consumption, she argues that the real downside of traditionally raised beef is that its an inefficient way to get protein. Vast amounts of acreage are set aside for growing plants to feed the cattle, and the animals require lots of water during their lifetimes. Combining the gestation period and the average lifespan of a market steer, it takes at least 27 months to make two briskets. Zoldan estimates that theyll be able to cultivate a complete brisket from just a few cells in three weeks once the process gets rolling.

Theres still much work ahead for the pair before BioBQ becomes a reality, which they hope is by 2023. What they lack now is the capital to move forward. We need funding, Kam says. We know exactly what we need to do in the lab. Hitching their marketing strategy to brisket and barbecue wasnt a bad idea. After all, it got me writing about lab-grown meat for the first time. But there is something about the idea of lab-grown brisket that keeps bothering me, and it has nothing to do with science fiction. If you could design any cut of beef from scratch, why choose one thats so difficult to make delicious? Why not a whole steers worth of ribeyes?

Im from Austin, and I know that briskets kind of a big deal here, Kam jokes. Brisket also raises the bar. It seemed like a great, challenging meat to demonstrate this technology working, she continues, and if they could successfully design a brisket, it would demonstrate their ability to design pretty much any other cut of beef from scratch. A futuristic vision is customizing each specific meat, Zoldan says. In addition to brisket, they also plan to offer BioBQ jerky as one of their initial products. Both women are clear that they dont envision BioBQ completely replacing traditionally grown beef. I dont think cell-based meats will take over the market, but I think theres a place for it on the market, Zoldan emphasizes.

As they drum up funding, Kam and Zoldan are also working to define the language around BioBQ. Focus groups have shown a disdain for the phrase lab-grown meat. The Impossible Burger has a brand name thats better than just plant-based burger. Maybe the name BioBQ will catch on just as organically. The thing I like about BioBQ is that it sort of forces a Southern accent when you say it, Kam says. Shes also working with a graphic designer on labeling and packaging solutions.

Kam and Zoldan are still years away from that first taste of BioBQ, and scaling up from there for public consumption will take even longer, but I wonder if theyd imagined that first bite. Would it come with any trepidation? Like that first person to eat a raw oyster, would the first bite of BioBQ require a certain level of bravery? Kams answer was immediate. She sees no reason why she would hesitate. In this age of consumers curiosity about where their meat comes from, Kam says that question about BioBQ will be easy to answer. Well know exactly how its made.

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Two Austin Women Hope to Build the First Lab-Grown Brisket - Texas Monthly

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Photos That Reveal the Hidden Side of Things – Obsev

Wednesday, August 26th, 2020

The world is full of wondrous things, but sometimes it's easy to forget this because were always so busy and stressed out.

Well, as luck would have it, there are some beautiful secrets hidden in plain sight and inside of things that most of us would never think to look at twice. So heres a collection of the hidden side of things that youve totally missed.

A ghost heart is created when doctors wash away all the donor cells. What you see here is a protein scaffold. This means the ghost heart is ready to receive a transplant of the recipients stem cells so that a new non-rejecting heart can be grown.

This might be hard to believe, but this is a human embryo in its early stages of development. Its actually sitting on the tip of a needle. Who would have imagined that we all looked this tiny at some point?

It might look like a bunch of fiber-optic cables, but this isnt the inside of a computer or a vast computer network. Its actually the inside of a tire and those cables are actually tire spokes.

The Easter Island Heads were carved from stone by ancient Polynesians somewhere between 1100 AD and 1500 AD. Most people only get to see these giant heads. However, they also have bodies that are buried underneath the surface.

Have you ever wondered what a blue whales blowhole actually looks like? Well here it is. And the funny thing is that it looks like a giant human nose or the nose of a statue floating on its back.

Most people assume that flamingos are tall and pink their entire lives, but thats not the case. A flamingos parent feeds them a bright red milk developed from their digestive tracts. As the baby continues to grow, it starts to develop pink feathers. And as adults, flamingos feed on a red and blue-green algae filled with beta carotene and an organic chemical with a reddish-orange pigment. Their digestive tracts extract the pigment which dissolve into fat. This fat is then deposited into new feathers, hence their pink color.

Have you ever wondered what the underside of a Lilly Pad looks like? Well it looks an awful lot like a placenta or a really veiny bathroom mat. Actually, it does function a bit like a placenta, taking nutrients to where they are needed.

This intricate network is a real human nervous system. In 1926, two medical students named M.A. Schalck and L.P. Ramsdell from Kirksville, Missouri, dissected a cadavers nervous system. The entire process took over 1,500 hours.

Most people assume that a turtles shell is just a shell. But it turns out that its a huge part of their skeletal structure. In fact, you might say its almost like an exo-skeleton and theres plenty of room for organs on the inside.

This is what salt crystals look like under an electron microscope. Some grains appear to be cubical while others are made up of overlapping cubes. The ionic compound of these salt crystals is composed of sodium and chloride atoms. When these molecules come together to form a crystal, they often arrange themselves in a cubical pattern.

If you thought brick streets were laid on the ground a brick at a time by underpaid laborers, guess again. In this photo, workers use a machine to lay an entire layer of bricks on this street in the Netherlands.

This ice crystal was found in Switzerland and it turns out that these crystals vary in intensity, shape and size. Scientists believe that these ice crystals grow to precipitation size because of a culmination of smaller ice crystals.

At a glance, this looks like the interior cabin of a boat or a really fancy apartment that most of us could never afford. But what youre really looking at is the inside of a really nice guitar that most of us probably couldnt afford either.

You know how everyones always telling you to wash your hands? You should listen to them. These are microbes left behind from an 8-year-old boys handprint after playing outside. Fortunately, your immune system will fight off most infectious agents.

Auroras are cosmic lights that can be seen from different planets in our solar system. They occur when the sun emits a stream of charged particles into the solar system. When the solar winds hit a planet, they interact with the surrounding magnetic field and compress the field into a teardrop type shape. This collision between nitrogen and oxygen molecules releases an energy that looks a lot like light ribbons across the sky.

This photo was taken by NASA of one of their space shuttles leaving Earths atmosphere. But to the untrained eye, it looks more like a hot needle poking through wool. It also looks like the shuttle is dragging some of the clouds up into space.

Most people assume that a tigers stripe is produced by patterns in their fur. But it turns out that their skin is also patterned. The darkness of the pigmentation of the skin is directly linked to the furs darkness.

Most people know what cacti look like, so its so surprising that this photo has any connections to one but it does. This is actually what remains of a dead cactus after it decomposes. All thats left are thorny spines that are sharp as knives.

You dont need x-ray vision to look inside a glass frog. This interesting species lives in the rain forests of Costa Rica, Ecuador, Colombia and Panama. And the skin on their underside is fully transparent, so you can literally see their beating heart and other internal organs.

This is what an elephant tail looks like up close and personal. Elephants use it to communicate with other elephants by wagging or swishing their tail. They also use their tail as a flyswatter to keep mosquitoes and flies from biting them.

What youre seeing is an agate shell thats been cut in half. Over time, minerals grew into the empty crevices and they eventually replaced the shell, too. So basically, it underwent a beautiful mineral metamorphosis.

Believe it or not, this isnt some futuristic set from a Sci-Fi movie or the interior of an alien spaceship docked in Area 51. Its an empty Boeing 787. The only difference here is that all of the seats have been removed from the cabin.

When we hear the word raccoon, most of us imagine that black and white look that reminds us of a burglar. But this raccoon suffers from a congenital disorder called Albinism, which has caused a complete loss of pigmentation. And since these creatures dont have their natural camouflage, theyre more vulnerable to attacks from predators.

Reporters out on the field always look so fabulous, but no one really shows you whats going on behind the scenes, or in this case, their backs. In reality, journalists have to wear transmitters, cables, and clip-on microphones that make them look like cyborgs.

When you think of a starfish, you imagine that it will be shaped like a star. But due to a rare birth defect, some 5-pointed starfish come out looking square-shaped. But while they might look different, their intricate patterns are still beautiful.

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Photos That Reveal the Hidden Side of Things - Obsev

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FDA Clears Jointechlabs’ MiniTC for Point-of-Care Fat Tissue Processing and its Broad Range of Applications – PRNewswire

Wednesday, August 26th, 2020

SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --Jointechlabs a leader in point-of-care regenerative medicine therapies today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared the company's MiniTCfor point-of-care fat tissue processing designed to obtain microfat (or fat grafts), for multiple indications. Jointechlabs plans to focus on a range of therapeutic areas including medical aesthetics, plastic surgery, orthobiologics and wound healing.

"The FDA clearance of MiniTC represents an important step forward in the regenerative medicine market," said Nathan Katz, Jointechlabs' CEO. "The company's comprehensive and proprietary technology provides a variety of tissue reconstruction and regeneration options, enabling healthcare practitioners in medical centers, hospitals and clinics to provide safe, reliable and cost-effective cell enriched fat grafts at the point-of-care."

MiniTC is a disposable, closed loop medical device that can be used in the clinic setting, with no change in infrastructure, eliminating the need for manual processing of fat tissue in the lab. Also, the device is less costly,cumbersome and labor intensive compared to what currently exists. MiniTC's performance has been validated in vitro and in vivo, including an observational orthopedic study in Israel and the UAE, involving 47 patients with 92% reporting functional improvement and no complications. Additionally, it was validated in clinical studies with lymphoedema patients as well as in the areas of facial aesthetics, hair regrowth and wound care.

"Jointechlabs' MiniTC device is easy to use and effective," said Joseph Purita, M.D., orthopedic surgeon and director of the Institute of Regenerative Medicine in Boca Raton, Florida."It is encouraging to see the continuing development of new technology for regenerative medicine that is compliant with FDA guidelines."

Microfat IsolationMiniTC allows for processing of adipose (fat) tissue without exposure to the external environment. The final product of the processing is a fine washed fractured fat tissue known as fat graft or microfat. When implanted by injection, the essential effect can be attributed to the preservation of the integrity of fat tissue and the stromal cells within its natural niche. Together it constitutes structural factors that trigger the reconstruction, regeneration and healing of connective tissues.It's a gentle process that uses an individual's own fat tissue tocushion and support areas of injury or damage as the body heals itself.

Pipeline ProductsJointechlabs has an extensive development program. In addition to MiniTC, the company's Mini-Stem a patented, disposable, closed loop medical device is pending approval in Europe (and under investigation in other countries) for isolation of stem cell fraction (SVF) from fat. Mini-Stem will enable doctors to provide safe, reliable, cost-effective non-surgical stem cell treatments at the point-of-care. Mini-Stem will serve as a platform for cell therapies and is well poised to target the developing regenerative medicine market, unlike any of the current devices.Additionally, Jointechlabs is developing proprietary stem cell-scaffold product as a biologic therapy for osteoarthritis, for approval under the FDA's fast-track program. A portion of the pre-clinical study for JTL-T-01 is funded by NIH's small business grant (SBIR grant) in collaboration with Rush University.

Headquartered in San Francisco, Jointechlabs is recognized as an experienced and respected emerging world leader in point-of-care regenerative medicine therapies. With its devices and technology, Jointechlabs enables healthcare practitioners to provide safe, reliable, cost-effective non-surgical regenerative medicine treatments at the point-of-care.For more information, please visit: http://jointechlabs.com/.

Media Contact:Betsy Levy | Phone: (415) 377-3112 | Email: [emailprotected]

SOURCE Jointechlabs

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FDA Clears Jointechlabs' MiniTC for Point-of-Care Fat Tissue Processing and its Broad Range of Applications - PRNewswire

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Research Roundup: Lasting Immunity to COVID-19 and More – BioSpace

Tuesday, August 25th, 2020

Every week there are numerous scientific studies published. Heres a look at some of the more interesting ones.

Multiple Studies Suggest Lasting Immunity to COVID-19 After Infection

Although probably not enough time has passed to know definitively, several studies are now suggesting that even mild cases of COVID-19 stimulate lasting immune responses, not only in disease-fighting antibodies, but in B- and T-cells.

Things are really working as theyre supposed to, Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona, and an author of one of the studies, told The New York Times.

Its difficult, probably impossible, to predict how long those immune responses will last, but many of the researchers believe the results are promising for long-term protection.

This is exactly what you would hope for, Marion Pepper, an immunologist at the University of Washington and an author of a study currently being reviewed by the journal Nature. All the pieces are there to have a totally protective immune response.

Pepper notes that the protective effects cant be completely evaluated until there is proof that people exposed to the virus a second time can fight it off. But the data suggests the immune system is indeed able to fight resistance a second time. Some of this qualification comes from unconfirmed reports of people being reinfected by the virus.

Antibody responses are typically relatively short-lived, disappearing from the blood weeks or months after being produced. Generally, the majority of the B-cells that produce antibodies die off, too. But the body keeps some longer-lived B-cells that are able to manufacture virus-fighting antibodies should the immune system be triggered by re-exposure to the virus. Some stay in the bloodstream while others wait in the bone marrow where they manufacture small numbers of antibodies that can sometimes be observed years, even decades later. Several studies, some by Bhattacharya and Pepper, have identified antibodies at low levels in the blood months after people recovered from COVID-19.

The antibodies decline, but they settle in what looks like a stable nadir, Bhattacharya said. These have been observed about three months after symptoms show up. The response looks perfectly durable.

Additional studies, including one published in the journal Cell, have isolated T-cells from recovered patients that can attack SARS-CoV-2. In laboratory studies, the T-cells produced signals to fight the virus and cloned themselves in large numbers to fight the potential infection.

This is very promising, said Smita Iyer, an immunologist at the University of California, Davis, who was not involved in the new studies, but has researched immune responses to the novel coronavirus in rhesus macaques. This calls for some optimism about herd immunity, and potentially a vaccine.

It's still has not been definitely determined if milder cases of COVID-19 will lead to long-term or even medium-term immunity. There have been some studies that suggest it does not and some newer studies suggesting it does. Iyer notes that the recent paper indicates, You can still get durable immunity without suffering the consequences of infection.

This idea is reinforced by Eun-Hyung Lee, an immunologist at Emory University who was not involved in these studies. He told The New York Times, Yes, you do develop immunity to this virus, and good immunity to this virus. Thats the message we want to get out there.

Why Seasonal Flu Vaccines Only Last a Year

As most everyone knows, flu vaccines only last about a year. Some of this is related to viral mutations. But in fact, the actual immunity itself caused by the vaccine does not appear to last longer than a year, even though the flu vaccine increases the number of antibody-producing cells specific for the flu in the bone marrow. Researchers out of Emory Vaccine Center found that for most newly-generated plasma cell lineages, between 70 and 99% of the cells were gone after one year, but that the levels of antibody-secreting cells in blood correlated with long-term response in the bone marrow.

Gut Bacteria Can Help Immuno-Oncology Therapies

Researchers with the University of Calgary identified gut bacteria that help our immune system fight cancerous tumors. This also helped provide more information about why immunotherapy works in some cases, but not others. By combining immunotherapy with specific microbial therapy, they believe they can help the immune system and immunotherapy be more effective in treating three types of cancer: melanoma, bladder and colorectal cancers. They found that specific bacteria were essential for immunotherapy to work in colorectal cancer tumors in germ-free mice. The bacteria produced a small molecule called inosine that interacts directly with T-cells and together with immunotherapy.

An Online Calculator to Predict Stroke Risk

Scientists at the University of Virginia Health System developed an online tool that measures the severity of a patients metabolic syndrome, a mix of conditions that includes high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels and excess body fat. With it, they can then predict the patients risk for ischemic stroke. The study discovered that stroke risk increased consistently with metabolic syndrome severity even in patients that did not have diabetes. The tool is available for free at https://metscalc.org/.

A Link Between Autism and Cholesterol

Researchers at Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Northwestern University identified a subtype of autism that is the result of a cluster of genes that regulate cholesterol metabolism and brain development. They believe this information can help design precision-targeted therapies for this specific type of autism and improve screening efforts for earlier diagnosis of autism. They analyzed the DNA from brain samples that they then confirmed with the medical records of autistic individuals. They found that children with autism and their parents had significant alterations in lipid blood. However, there is much more to be understood, emphasizing the complexity of autism, which is affected by a variety of genetic and environmental factors.

Researchers Grow First Functioning Mini Human Heart Model

Investigators with Michigan State University grew the first miniature human heart model in the laboratory that is complete with all primary heart cell types and a functioning structure of chambers and vascular tissue. They utilized induced pluripotent stem cells which were obtained from consenting adults and created a functional mini heart in a few weeks. The primary value was in giving them an unprecedented view into how a fetal heart develops.

In the lab, we are currently using heart organoids to model congenital heart diseasethe most common birth defect in humans affecting nearly 1% of the newborn population, said Aitor Aguirre, senior author and assistant professor of biomedical engineering at MSUs Institute for Quantitative Health Science and Engineering. With our heart organoids, we can study the origin of congenital heart disease and find ways to stop it.

Another area of focus is that improving on the final organoid will help with future research. Current heart organoids are not identical yet to human hearts and so are flawed in their use as research models.

More:
Research Roundup: Lasting Immunity to COVID-19 and More - BioSpace

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The Truth About Cosmetic Treatments review a format in need of a facelift – The Guardian

Tuesday, August 25th, 2020

This year, in many ways, has seemed the ideal time to get heavily, extravagantly into fillers. Human contact is still largely outlawed, so if it all blows up in your face (as it can do, quite literally), it is socially acceptable to hide behind a mask. Besides, some studies have drawn a correlation between the hours spent looking-but-not-actually-looking at yourself in Zooms tiny thumbnail (were my eyes always this far apart? Or this close together?) and the uptick in cosmetic procedures post-lockdown.

But, if you do decide to get a little Botox and perhaps some tear-trough fillers, too, while youre at it you may have to contend with Dr Michael Mosleys not-angry-but-disappointed face, as he visits a tweakment clinic near you in two-parter The Truth About Cosmetic Treatments (BBC One). Mosley, who is on most other TV shows where a bit of judgment is de rigueur (see also: Channel 4s Lose a Stone in 21 Days) is here to see whether the rise in nonsurgical treatments could be doing more harm than good. But first, time to ask some people on the street whose fault this all is. The Kardashians and Kylie Jenner? I for one am shocked that some of the most famous people on the planet could be influencing our behaviour.

The rest of the programme isnt so much The Truth About Cosmetic Treatments as A Largely Negative But Ultimately Commonsense Guide to Them. Do use Google. Dont get Botox in the back of a car. Do not pass go, do not collect 200. Co-presenter Mehreen Baig, a blogger and journalist, is mostly good cop, telling us that people should get tweakments if they want them and if they will make them feel better about themselves. She visits a doctor offering nonsurgical rhinoplasty, increasing the volume of noses with fillers while making them appear smaller. She listens kindly while a group of middle-aged women undergo newfangled microneedling and drink some kind of collagen Capri Sun to see if they can roll back the years. She even watches as fat is extracted from the body of a heavily sedated woman called Kim, to be harvested for stem cells, which are then injected back into her face. Sure, Baig is visibly revolted as she watches, but it could be worse: remember that period in the early 00s when it seemed as if every celebrity was drinking their own wee?

Meanwhile, Mosley is, if not bad cop, then largely disapproving cop. He considers the pitiful case of Emma, a woman whose bungled lip filler left a huge pouch of skin around her mouth, which she describes, unappetisingly, as the sausage. People can do tweakments anywhere, with no qualifications, he reminds us, so its important to check out peoples credentials. The issue here, though Mosley doesnt get into it, isnt so much that people dont go running to the General Medical Council before booking lip fillers, its that they trust a friend or acquaintance, and are tempted by cheap deals.

If Mosley is the not-angry-but-disappointed parent, the kind who said: Now, why have you gone and done that? when you got your earlobes pierced, he at least decides to make his own apathy towards tweakments clear, undergoing a heat gun treatment to stimulate his skin, and then complaining that it has merely left him looking like he has bad sunburn.

You have seen at least 80% of this programme in some shape or form at least 1,000 times before about self-esteem, safety, social media and not getting fillers from someone in their garden shed. Perhaps the most interesting, if undeveloped, section was on preventive measures and whether people in their 20s need to be getting Botox at all. (The answer was probably not but where was the scientific modelling, the kind dedicated to finding out Mosleys exact skin age, to find out whether that should be definitely not?)

The second episode focuses on bum lifts and steroid-taking lads, and is sure yet again to hammer home the already well-known risks of doing anything other than sitting in a darkened room until the end of time. More helpful, perhaps, would be a programme that descended, if only slightly, from the moral high ground and stopped wrinkling its nose something that is sure to speed up the ageing process.

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The Truth About Cosmetic Treatments review a format in need of a facelift - The Guardian

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AgeX Therapeutics Reports Second Quarter 2020 Financial Results and Provides Business Update – Business Wire

Saturday, August 15th, 2020

ALAMEDA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (AgeX; NYSE American: AGE), a biotechnology company developing therapeutics for human aging and regeneration, reported financial and operating results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2020.

AgeX made strides with respect to its newly established licensing and collaboration model, which aims to embed its technology platforms across the cell therapy industry. AgeX has entered into a research license for the use of its immunotolerance UniverCyteTM technology by Sernova Corp. (Sernova), a publicly-listed Canadian regenerative medicine therapeutics company. It also entered a Manufacturing, Marketing, and Distribution Agreement with Pluristyx, Inc. (Pluristyx), an advanced therapy tools and services company serving customers in the fields of regenerative medicine and cellular and gene therapies. In addition, AgeX signed a letter of intent with ImStem Biotechnology (ImStem), for ImStem to utilize AgeXs ESI-brand pluripotent stem cells to derive a cell therapy product for potential use in the treatment of COVID-19 and as well acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) from non-COVID-19 causes.

We are working diligently to position our subsidiary Reverse Bioengineering to optimize the potential of induced tissue regeneration (iTR) technology, said Michael West, CEO of AgeX. We believe this technology offers a powerful new modality to treat age-related degenerative diseases by reversing developmental aging in a tissue, thereby unlocking an innate capacity of tissues to regenerate scarlessly.

AgeX completed its restructuring to streamline its operations to allow efficient usage of capital in the current pandemic environment as well to meet near-term strategic company priorities of deriving value and generating preclinical and ultimately clinical data from our technology platforms through external licensing and collaboration agreements. In the longer-term, AgeX remains committed to in-house product development of AgeX-BAT1 and AgeX-VASC1. AgeX is considering options to bring capital into the company.

AgeX has made excellent progress in terms of its collaboration and licensing model, closing five deals since the beginning of the year so far, said Greg Bailey M.D., Chairman of AgeX. The deals have spanned all three of our technology platforms of UniverCyte for the generation of universal cells, PureStem for the derivation and manufacturing of therapeutic cells, and AgeX ESI pluripotent stem cells to act as a source material for cellular therapies. All these deals show the value industry and academia see in our offerings.

Q2 Highlights

Liquidity and Capital Resources

AgeX is in need of additional capital to finance its operations. On March 30, 2020, AgeX entered into a Secured Convertible Facility Agreement (the New Loan Agreement) with Juvenescence Limited pursuant to which AgeX may borrow funds from time to time. As of August 14, 2020, AgeX has borrowed $3.5 million and may draw additional funds from time to time subject to Juvenescences discretion, prior to the contractual repayment date on March 30, 2023. AgeX may not draw down more than $1.0 million in any single draw. More information about the New Loan Agreement can be found in AgeXs Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q for the periods ended March 31, 2020 and June 30, 2020 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 30, 2020, May 14, 2020, and August 14, 2020 respectively.

On April 13, 2020, AgeX obtained a loan in the amount of $432,952 from Axos Bank under the Paycheck Protection Program (the PPP Loan). The PPP Loan bears interest at a rate of 1% per annum. No payments will be due on the PPP Loan during a six month deferral period commencing on the date of the promissory note. Commencing one month after the expiration of the deferral period, and continuing on the same day of each month thereafter until the maturity date of the PPP Loan, monthly payments of principal and interest will be due, in an amount required to fully amortize the principal amount outstanding on the PPP Loan by the maturity date. The maturity date is April 13, 2022. The principal amount of the PPP Loan is subject to forgiveness under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) to the extent that PPP Loan proceeds are used to pay expense permitted by the PPP, including payroll, rent, and utilities (collectively, Qualifying Expenses), during the time frame permitted by the PPP. AgeX believes that it has used the PPP Loan amount for Qualifying Expenses. However, no assurance is provided that AgeX will obtain forgiveness of the PPP Loan in whole or in part.

Staff Reductions

In May 2020, AgeX laid off 11 research and development personnel and consequently paid approximately $105,000 in accrued payroll and unused paid time off and other benefits and recognized approximately $194,800 in restructuring charges in connection with the reduction in staffing, consisting of contractual severance and other employee termination benefits, substantially all of which have been settled in cash. The staff reductions followed AgeXs strategic review of its operations, giving consideration to the status of its product development programs, human resources, capital needs and resources, and current conditions in the capital markets resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Going Concern Considerations

As required under Accounting Standards Update 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements-Going Concern (ASC 205-40), AgeX evaluates whether conditions and/or events raise substantial doubt about its ability to meet its future financial obligations as they become due within one year after the date its financial statements are issued. Based on AgeXs most recent projected cash flows, and considering that loans from Juvenescence under the New Loan Agreement will be subject to Juvenescences discretion, AgeX believes that its cash and cash equivalents, the remaining $5.5 million available under the New Loan Agreement and reduction in staff in May 2020 would not be sufficient to satisfy its anticipated operating and other funding requirements for the twelve months following the filing of AgeXs Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. These factors raise substantial doubt regarding the ability of AgeX to continue as a going concern.

Second Quarter 2020 Operating Results

Revenues: Total revenues for the second quarter of 2020 were $414,000 as compared with $380,000 for the second quarter of 2019. AgeX revenues are primarily generated from subscription and advertising revenues from the GeneCards online database through its subsidiary LifeMap Sciences, Inc. Revenues in 2020 also included approximately $36,000 of allowable expenses under its research grant from the NIH as compared with $47,000 in the same period in 2019.

Operating expenses: Operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2020 were $3.0 million as compared to $3.8 million for the same period in 2019. On an as-adjusted basis, operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2020 were $2.5 million as compared to $3.1 million for the same period in 2019.

The reconciliation between GAAP and non-GAAP operating expenses is provided in the financial tables included with this earnings release.

Research and development expenses decreased by $0.3 million to $1.4 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020 from $1.7 million during the same period in 2019. The decrease was primarily attributable to the layoff of 11 research and development personnel in May 2020 and decrease in shared services from Lineage Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (Lineage) with the termination of our Shared Facilities and Services Agreement on September 30, 2019.

General and administrative expenses decreased by $0.4 million to $1.7 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020 from $2.1 million during the same period in 2019 despite an increase in head count with the employment of AgeXs own finance team since October 1, 2019. These increases were offset by a decrease in travel and related expenses with the shelter in place mandates since March 15, 2020 resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the elimination of shared facilities and services fees from Lineage following the termination of the Shared Facilities and Services Agreement on September 30, 2019.

About AgeX Therapeutics

AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. (NYSE American: AGE) is focused on developing and commercializing innovative therapeutics for human aging. Its PureStem and UniverCyte manufacturing and immunotolerance technologies are designed to work together to generate highly defined, universal, allogeneic, off-the-shelf pluripotent stem cell-derived young cells of any type for application in a variety of diseases with a high unmet medical need. AgeX has two preclinical cell therapy programs: AGEX-VASC1 (vascular progenitor cells) for tissue ischemia and AGEX-BAT1 (brown fat cells) for Type II diabetes. AgeXs revolutionary longevity platform induced Tissue Regeneration (iTR) aims to unlock cellular immortality and regenerative capacity to reverse age-related changes within tissues. AGEX-iTR1547 is an iTR-based formulation in preclinical development. HyStem is AgeXs delivery technology to stably engraft PureStem cell therapies in the body. AgeXs core product pipeline is intended to extend human healthspan. AgeX is seeking opportunities to establish licensing and collaboration arrangements around its broad IP estate and proprietary technology platforms and therapy product candidates.

For more information, please visit http://www.agexinc.com or connect with the company on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, and YouTube.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this release are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements that are not historical fact including, but not limited to statements that contain words such as will, believes, plans, anticipates, expects, estimates should also be considered forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from the results anticipated in these forward-looking statements and as such should be evaluated together with the many uncertainties that affect the business of AgeX Therapeutics, Inc. and its subsidiaries, particularly those mentioned in the cautionary statements found in more detail in the Risk Factors section of AgeXs most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commissions (copies of which may be obtained at http://www.sec.gov). Subsequent events and developments may cause these forward-looking statements to change. In addition, with respect to AgeXs Manufacturing, Marketing and Distribution Agreement with Pluristyx there is no assurance that (i) Pluristyx will generate significant sales of AgeX ESI hESC lines, or (ii) AgeX will derive significant revenue from sales of ESI hESC lines by Pluristyx. AgeX specifically disclaims any obligation or intention to update or revise these forward-looking statements as a result of changed events or circumstances that occur after the date of this release, except as required by applicable law.

AGEX THERAPEUTICS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PAR VALUE AMOUNTS)

June 30,2020

December 31,2019

(Unaudited)

ASSETS

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents

$

1,033

$

2,352

Accounts and grants receivable, net

235

363

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

836

1,339

Total current assets

2,104

4,054

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AgeX Therapeutics Reports Second Quarter 2020 Financial Results and Provides Business Update - Business Wire

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Survivors of Pediatric Cancers May Experience Lasting Impact on Heart, Metabolic Health Following Radiation Therapy – Pharmacy Times

Saturday, August 15th, 2020

Survivors of Pediatric Cancers May Experience Lasting Impact on Heart, Metabolic Health Following Radiation Therapy

Previous reports had been made regarding the impact of radiation therapy on the metabolic health of survivors of pediatric leukemia, brain tumors, and hematopoietic stem cell transplants. However, the radiation therapys effect on survivors of pediatric abdominal and pelvic tumors had not yet been assessed.

"Body composition abnormalities and cardiometabolic impairments are of concern among survivors given that in the general population, these conditions increase the risk of developing life-threatening diseases including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes," said Carmen Wilson, PhD, assistant member in the Epidemiology and Cancer Control Department at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, in a press release.

Specifically, the analyses showed that survivors of abdominal and pelvic solid tumors had low lean body mass, which is the measurement of the non-fat content of the body. The researchers found that survivors lean body mass was lower than the general population and that the lower relative lean body mass was connected with the prior abdominal or pelvic radiation. Those individuals with lower lean body mass burn fewer calories while resting than those with higher lean body mass, Wilson explained.

In conducting the study, the researchers assessed 431 adult survivors of pediatric abdominal or pelvic solid tumors who were treated at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. At the time of the study, the median age of the participants was 29.9 years.

Of the childhood diagnoses, the most frequent were neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, and germ cell tumor, with a median age of 3.6 years at diagnosis. Approximately 37% of participants had received abdominal radiation therapy and 36% had received pelvic radiation therapy during their treatment.

In order to assess the participants' body composition, metabolic abnormalities, and physical function in relation to the general population, the researchers used data from the 2013 to 2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) that matched the age, sex, and ethnicity of the patients in the study.

The researchers found that compared with individuals from NHANES, the survivors of abdominal and pelvic solid tumors had a significantly higher likelihood of having insulin resistance (33.8% vs. 40.6%), high triglycerides (10.02% vs. 18.4%), and low levels of high-density lipoproteins (28.9% vs. 33.5%), which are commonly referred to as good cholesterol. However, the levels of low-density lipoproteins (bad cholesterol) between survivors and individuals from NHANES showed no significant differences.

"It is possible that abdominal and pelvic-directed radiation therapy damages postural muscles or subtly impairs sex hormone production, ultimately affecting muscle mass," Wilson said in the press release.

Radiation therapy has been previously shown to cause muscle injury, resulting in the loss of muscle fiber and muscle regenerative cells in animal studies, Wilson explained. She noted that lifestyle choices could potentially affect relative lean mass and cardiometabolic health as well.

The researchers said that it would be beneficial for future research on the topic to examine the effect of radiation therapy and other cancer treatments in relation to fat distribution in the body. This is of particular interest because increased abdominal obesity can be a stronger predictor of adverse effects than overall obesity, according to the study.

Additionally, Wilson noted that she is interested in investigating how lifestyle behaviors might influence lean mass among survivors of pediatric cancers.

"While it may not be possible to avoid radiation therapy as a key treatment for many solid tumors, early research suggests that resistance training interventions in survivors increase lean mass," Wilson said. "Further work is needed to see if training would also impact cardiometabolic impairments in this population."

REFERENCERadiation to treat pediatric cancers may have lasting impact on heart and metabolic health. American Association for Cancer Research; August 13, 2020. eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-08/aafc-rtt081020.php. Accessed August 14, 2020.

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Survivors of Pediatric Cancers May Experience Lasting Impact on Heart, Metabolic Health Following Radiation Therapy - Pharmacy Times

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Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market- Industry Analysis and Forecast (2020-2027) – Good Night, Good Hockey

Saturday, August 15th, 2020

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Marketwas valued US$ XX Mn in 2019 and is expected to reach US$ XX Mn by 2027, at a CAGR of 24.5% during a forecast period.

Market Dynamics

The Research Report gives an in-depth account of the drivers and restraints in the stem cell reconstructive market. Stem cell reconstructive surgery includes the treatment of injured or dented part of body. Stem cells are undifferentiated biological cells, which divide to produce more stem cells. Growing reconstructive surgeries led by the rising number of limbs elimination and implants and accidents are boosting the growth in the stem cell reconstructive market. Additionally, rising number of aged population, number of patients suffering from chronic diseases, and unceasing development in the technology, these are factors which promoting the growth of the stem cell reconstructive market. Stem cell reconstructive is a procedure containing the use of a patients own adipose tissue to rise the fat volume in the area of reconstruction and therefore helping 3Dimentional reconstruction in patients who have experienced a trauma or in a post-surgical event such as a mastectomy or lumpectomy, brain surgery, or reconstructive surgery as a result of an accident or injury. Stem cell reconstructive surgeries are also used in plastic or cosmetic surgeries as well. Stem cell and regenerative therapies gives many opportunities for development in the practice of medicine and the possibility of an array of novel treatment options for patients experiencing a variety of symptoms and conditions. Stem cell therapy, also recognised as regenerative medicine, promotes the repair response of diseased, dysfunctional or injured tissue using stem cells or their derivatives.

The common guarantee of all the undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs), foetal, amniotic, UCB, and adult stem cell types is their indefinite self-renewal capacity and high multilineage differentiation potential that confer them a primitive and dynamic role throughout the developmental process and the lifespan in adult mammal.However, the high expenditure of stem cell reconstructive surgeries and strict regulatory approvals are restraining the market growth.

The report study has analyzed revenue impact of covid-19 pandemic on the sales revenue of market leaders, market followers and disrupters in the report and same is reflected in our analysis.

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market Segment analysis

Based on Cell Type, the embryonic stem cells segment is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% during the forecast period. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), derived from the blastocyst stage of early mammalian embryos, are distinguished by their capability to distinguish into any embryonic cell type and by their ability to self-renew. Owing to their plasticity and potentially limitless capacity for self-renewal, embryonic stem cell therapies have been suggested for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Additionally, their potential in regenerative medicine, embryonic stem cells provide a possible another source of tissue/organs which serves as a possible solution to the donor shortage dilemma. Researchers have differentiated ESCs into dopamine-producing cells with the hope that these neurons could be used in the treatment of Parkinsons disease. Upsurge occurrence of cardiac and malignant diseases is promoting the segment growth. Rapid developments in this vertical contain protocols for directed differentiation, defined culture systems, demonstration of applications in drug screening, establishment of several disease models, and evaluation of therapeutic potential in treating incurable diseases.

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market Regional analysis

The North American region has dominated the market with US$ XX Mn. America accounts for the largest and fastest-growing market of stem cell reconstructive because of the huge patient population and well-built healthcare sector. Americas stem cell reconstructive market is segmented into two major regions such as North America and South America. More than 80% of the market is shared by North America due to the presence of the US and Canada.

Europe accounts for the second-largest market which is followed by the Asia Pacific. Germany and UK account for the major share in the European market due to government support for research and development, well-developed technology and high healthcare expenditure have fuelled the growth of the market. This growing occurrence of cancer and diabetes in America is the main boosting factor for the growth of this market.

The objective of the report is to present a comprehensive analysis of the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market including all the stakeholders of the industry. The past and current status of the industry with forecasted market size and trends are presented in the report with the analysis of complicated data in simple language. The report covers all the aspects of the industry with a dedicated study of key players that includes market leaders, followers and new entrants. PORTER, SVOR, PESTEL analysis with the potential impact of micro-economic factors of the market has been presented in the report. External as well as internal factors that are supposed to affect the business positively or negatively have been analysed, which will give a clear futuristic view of the industry to the decision-makers.

The report also helps in understanding Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market dynamics, structure by analysing the market segments and projects the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market size. Clear representation of competitive analysis of key players by Application, price, financial position, Product portfolio, growth strategies, and regional presence in the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market make the report investors guide.Scope of the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Sources

Allogeneic Autologouso Bone Marrowo Adipose Tissueo Blood Syngeneic OtherGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Cell Type

Embryonic Stem Cell Adult Stem CellGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Application

Cancer Diabetes Traumatic Skin Defect Severe Burn OtherGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By End-User

Hospitals Research Institute OthersGlobal Stem Cell Reconstructive Market, By Regions

North America Europe Asia-Pacific South America Middle East and Africa (MEA)Key Players operating the Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market

Osiris Therapeutics NuVasives Cytori Therapeutics Takeda (TiGenix) Cynata Celyad Medi-post Anterogen Molmed Baxter Eleveflow Mesoblast Ltd. Micronit Microfluidics TAKARA BIO INC. Tigenix Capricor Therapeutics Astellas Pharma US, Inc. Pfizer Inc. STEMCELL Technologies Inc.

Global Stem Cell Reconstructive Market Request For View Sample Report Page : @https://www.maximizemarketresearch.com/request-sample/54688

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Meet The 12 Next-Gen Food Techs Transforming The Future Of Protein – Green Queen Media

Saturday, August 15th, 2020

Today (August 11), Big Idea Ventures (BIV) announces the launch of its second food technology accelerator program in New York City and Singapore. This years cohort includes 12 early-stage startups working in the plant-based and cell-based space, innovating new technologies that will be vital if we are to successfully shift towards a more sustainable food system. Below we highlight the exciting companies in BIVs latest cohort.

Founded: 2018

Founder: Vince Lu

Headquarters: Beijing, China

Mission: Zhenmeat is Chinas first and leading plant-based meat startup creating sustainable protein substitutes that are tailored to the Chinese palate. Its products include plant-based pork, mooncakes, sausages and meatballs, made from pea protein, fungus, cellulose, coconut oil and various natural flavour extracts and spices. Zhenmeat is also working on vegan crayfish and pork tenderloin. Their products are currently sold online and through various restaurant partners in China.

Founded: 2019

Founders: Stephen Michael Co, Carlo Antonio Ng & Carissa Jane Lim

Headquarters: Manila, Philippines

Mission: WTH Foods (Worth The Health) is a plant-based meat company developing sustainable alternatives made using carefully-sourced local ingredients and inspired by regional flavours. Its products include pinoy pulled jackfruit pork, jackfruit nuggets and mung bean-based ground meat. WTH Foods products are currently available online via its website.

Founded: 2019

Founder: Vinayaka Srinivas & Thanh Hung Nguyen

Headquarters: Singapore

Mission: GaiaFoods is Singapores first cell-based red meat company. Using stem cell biotechnology, the company cultivates meat that tastes and looks exactly like real meat but without the need to harm animals, making it a cruelty-free and sustainable alternative, and does not contain any hormones, antibiotics or the use of any toxic chemicals.

Founded: 2015

Founders: Alejandro Cancino & Paola Moro

Headquarters: Brisbane, Australia

Mission: Fenn Foods is an Australian startup creating healthy, affordable and tasty plant-based protein alternatives made using ethically sourced ingredients such as textured vegetable protein derived from soybeans, yeast extract and pea protein. Its products include a beef alternative dubbed veef, schnitzel and chicken burger patties. The company does not use any ingredients that are GMO and source as many local and organic produce as possible.

Founded: 2020

Founder: Nieves Martnez Marshall

Headquarters: Berkeley, California, U.S.

Mission: Novel Farms, Inc. uses synthetic biology to make cruelty-free, cost-efficient and functionalised 3D scaffolds for the production of structured cultured meats and their first project is jamon iberico. Its technology helps to improve the marbling and texture of cell-based meats and can also reduce manufacturing costs. Its mission is to transform more sustainable and slaughter-free cell-based meats into a sought-after culinary experience.

Founded: 2013

Founder: Aleem Ahmed

Headquarters: San Francisco, California, U.S.

Mission: Wild For Co. connects farmers to families by creating nutritious and delicious foods using the ancient Ethiopian superfood grain teff. Its star product is a vegan-friendly air-popped chip made with teff, which is naturally gluten-free, high-protein, high-fibre and is packed with nutrients such as calcium, iron and the essential amino acids.

Founded: 2019

Founders: Kartik Dixit & Shraddha Bhansali

Headquarters: Mumbai, India

Mission: EVO Foods is Indias first plant-based egg startup using food science and plant biochemistry to develop a vegan egg alternative. Its first product is a 100% plant-based liquid egg made from protein derived from lentils, which contains no cholesterol and antibiotics. It recently received angel investment from Wild Earth founder Ryan Bethencourt, as well as VegInvest and Shiok Meats co-founder Sandhya Sriram.

Founded: 2019

Founder: Patricia Bubner

Headquarters: Berkeley, California, U.S.

Mission: Orbillion Bio is a startup looking to develop premium cell-based meat products from heritage cell lines that are directly sourced from farmers. On a mission to accelerate the broad availability of a variety of nutritious cultivated meat products, the startups first product will be bison jerky that is low-fat, low-cholesterol and high-protein.

Founded: 2020

Founders: Darko Mandich & Aaron Schaller

Headquarters: Berkeley, California, U.S.

Mission: MeliBio is using microbiology to cultivate sustainable and clean honey that has the same taste and nutritional profile as conventional honey. Because it is produced without traditional beekeeping techniques, its honey does not harm pollinator diversity, especially wild and native bee populations, which have been jeopardized over the years by the expansion of commercial beekeeping.

Founded: 2020

Founders: Jason Rosenbaum & Hailey Swartz

Headquarters: New York City, New York, U.S.

Mission: Actual Veggies creates chef-crafted fresh and refrigerated burgers that puts vegetables front and centre all their burgers are colourful, showcasing their primary vegetable ingredient. They contain only fresh farm veggies and natural binding units, such as kale, sweet potatoes, mushrooms and beets. With added plant proteins such as legumes and seeds, each patty has around 10 grams of protein.

Founded: 2018

Founders: Kerem Erikci & Can Akcali

Headquarters: Ankara, Turkey

Mission: Biftek.co is a startup producing cultivated medium that can replace fetal-bovine-serum (FBS) in the production of cell-based meats. Using its novel culture supplement formulation to grow muscle stem cells, its solution is 80% to 90% less expensive, which can help food techs lower the cost of producing cultivated proteins.

Founded: 2016

Founder: Bonnie Lau

Headquarters: San Francisco, California, U.S.

Mission: Yoconut is a plant-based dairy brand creating delicious, healthy and allergy-friendly coconut-based yoghurts that contain live cultures and no added sugar. Currently, the brand has five vegan coconut yoghurt products in various flavours, and is available online as well as in a number of stores across California.

Lead image courtesy of Veef / Fenn Foods.

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Meet The 12 Next-Gen Food Techs Transforming The Future Of Protein - Green Queen Media

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Meat-lover who wants to save the planet? 3D printed steaks are your solution – ThePrint

Sunday, July 12th, 2020

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Billions of animals are killed for food every year. In fact the total number slaughtered every two years exceeds the number of people that have ever lived.

Whether youre a keen meat eater or not, theres no ignoring that its production consumes a huge amount of natural resources:15,000 litres of water to produce a single kilogram of beef.

Many studies highlight the health benefits of reducing meat consumption too. A report published in the JAMA Internal Medicine found that eatingtwo servings of red meat, processed meat or poultry a weekwas linked to a 3-7% higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Growing alternatives

Its no surprise, then, that theres a growing amount of interest in meat alternatives.

A start-up firm in Israel, Redefine Meat, is using industrial-scale 3D-printing to produce a plant-based alt-steak that it says has a structure and texture similar to that of the real thing.

Eshchar Ben-Shitrit, the companys chief executive and co-founder, told Reuters: We can do the entire cow, not only one part of the cow.

In 2019, his firm raised $6 million in funding an indication of how seriously the non-meat meat market is being taken. According to a report in Vox,demand for meat alternatives in the US leapt by 264%while the coronavirus pandemic was raging. Redefine Meat says it expects the category to beworth $140 billion annually by 2030.

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Heres to your health

Eating too much meat red meat in particular has been associated with a range of health problems for decades includingheart diseaseand some forms of cancer. It has beenlinked with obesitytoo.In the US, over 70% of people are overweight or obese.

In China, meat consumption has grown as economic development has ushered in a series of societal changes. Rapid urbanization and the adoption of so-called Western lifestyle habits, like eating more fast food and meat in general, are two of the more visible examples. Under the surface, there are signs peoples health is starting to suffer.

A McKinsey report from 2019 sums it up by saying: Alas, as incomes have grown, so too have waistlines.Diets high in protein and fat have taken hold in China, leading to a 10% urban-area obesity rate projected to increase to 25% by 2030 if left unchecked. Obesity is already costing the country more than $93 billion annually, or 1.1% of GDP.

Meatless meatballs, burgers, sausages and more have been available in supermarkets around the world for decades. They tend to contain things like soy, rice, peas and other vegetables.

The challenge for such products has tended to be that no matter how they taste, their texture doesnt resemble meat. Thats something the use of 3D-printing technology could overcome, as it creates layers of interwoven fibres that more closely mimic the real thing.

In 2013, meanwhile, a food scientist in the Netherlands hit upon a different approach. Mark Post of the University of Maastricht unveileda burger grown in a laboratory from cattle stem cells and muscle tissue. At a biochemical level, his burger is made from the same stuff as a regular burger meat tissues.

But it didnt come from an animal. Technically it isnt the flesh and muscle fibre of any cow. Whether or not that means it is meat may be a question for philosophers to ponder.

A route forward

As well as consuming resources, the meat industry generated considerable amounts of greenhouse gas emissions. Compared with the production of a regular meat burger,plant-based alternatives use up to 99% less water, 95% less land, and 90% less emissions, according to the United Nations.

None of which gets us away from the rising global demand for meat. But there are short- and long-term changes that will help address some of these concerns. The UN cites a study undertaken by the University of Michigan, on behalf of the meat-substitute producer Beyond Meat. It suggests that Americans eat, on average, three burgers per week but could save the amount of greenhouse gas emissions produced by 12 million cars, simply by swapping one of those weekly meals with a plant-based alternative.

The UNs Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) suggests a series ofchanges in consumers attitude and behaviour will be requiredto secure a more sustainable global food supply. These include raising awareness among the general public of the importance of tackling food waste: around the worldone-third of all food produced ends up in the garbage.

The FAO also calls for a rebalancing of food prices to reflect the total cost of food production and supply. That includes the loss of biodiversity from land-clearance, emissions and pollution, and the consumption of water. And it suggests a reduction in per-capita meat consumption in affluent countries.

This article was first published in World Economic Forum.

Also read: Nagaland bans sale of dog meat after incidents of pets being shot at sight spark outrage

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Meat-lover who wants to save the planet? 3D printed steaks are your solution - ThePrint

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Fat stem cells improve prognosis in patients with Covid-19 …

Saturday, July 11th, 2020

ABC Health

Updated:10/07/202017:28h

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Spanish researchers have seen that a fat stem cell therapy improves the prognosis in patients with Covid-19. The research, which has just been published in ClinicalMedicine, magazine that belongs to the group The Lancet, shows that a cell therapy with stem cells from adipose tissue for the treatment of critically ill patients covid-19, which has been applied through a compassionate use program, reduces 75% of treated patients inflammation and increases the activity of your immune system.

The patients included in this study have been treated in four Spanish centers: Fundacin Jimnez Daz, the Clnica Universidad de Navarra, the Hospital Universitario de Salamanca and the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maran.

Research has evaluated the tolerability and safety of administration to patients of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells, known as multipotent cells, can differentiate into various cell types while maintaining a high capacity for renewal.

Those coming from adipose tissue cells (adipocytes) They have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects, are easily accessible and have a great capacity to expand also in the laboratory over long periods of time without losing their characteristics.

Advanced mesenchymal stem cell therapy is already approved for some inflammatory diseases. In turn, there is preclinical evidence that intravenous administration of this cell therapy in models of respiratory infection caused by viruses reduces lung damage. For this reason, together with the fact of the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of lung damage associated with SARS-CoV-2, we think that this therapy could be a beneficial alternative for severe covid-19 patients , points out the Felipe Prosper, senior researcher at Up.

The research presents the results of a study in which cells have been treated for the first time mother mesenquimales Covid-19 patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. In our Cell Production units we have been able to store these stem cells and have them available to administer to the 13 patients participating in the study.

They were all in critical condition and they had previously received treatment with antivirals and anti-inflammatories, a therapeutic protocol that is currently being used to combat the disease, he explains. Francisco Fernndez-Avils, of the Gregorio Maran General University Hospital.

Patients received between one and three doses of these cells from healthy donors. Two weeks after the first dose, nine patients improved their clinical condition and seven were already extubated and out of the ICU. In no case did we observe any adverse effects related to treatment , confirms Fermn Snchez-Guijo, of the University Hospital of Salamanca and of Institute of Biomedical Research of Salamanca (IBSAL), and first signatory of the published work.

In this preliminary series of cases, the researchers observed a general improvement of ventilation, radiological and biological parameters of patients associated with this cell therapy. According to the experts, the results obtained in this study represent the basis for further progress in order to demonstrate whether this treatment is really effective in patients with covid-19 pneumonia.

The therapy already has the approval of the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Health Products (AEMPS) to carry out the phase 2 clinical trial whose objective will be to demonstrate the efficacy of the treatment against standard therapy.

This work is the first published study that includes a series of patients with severe Covid-19 pneumonia treated with this cell therapy. Currently, multiple studies have been started with stem cells in patients with covid-19 pneumonia, both in Spain and in other countries of the world, in which the use of various sources of stem cells such as bone marrow, fat, or placenta .

We are convinced that our results are particularly relevant as they support the performance of these studies, says the doctor. Damin Garca Olmo, from Jimnez Daz Foundation.

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