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Archive for the ‘Molecular Genetics’ Category

David Hogness, Revolutionary of 20th Century Genetics, Dies – The Scientist

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

David Hogness courtesy stanford medicine David Hogness, a biochemist, geneticist, and developmental biologist at Stanford University, died at his home on December 24. He was 94 years old.

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SFARI funds to support diversity at Gordon Research Conferences – SFARI News

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

Over the years, the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative (SFARI) has made contributions to selected Gordon Research Conferences (GRCs) with the aim of helping to defray the travel and/or conference costs for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, trainees and other scientists attending these conferences. As part of SFARIs efforts to encourage diversity and inclusion at scientific meetings and in autism research, SFARI will now require that GRCs organizers allocate all SFARI-donated funds to support attendance specifically of early career (pre-tenure) women, early career trainees from historically underrepresented groups, and scientists from the following ethnic and racial groups: Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Black or African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. We hope that, by lowering barriers to conferences attendance, SFARI support will promote opportunities for scientific growth and collaborations that can help build a more inclusive research community and advance the field, says SFARI director Louis Reichardt.

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Research Roundup: Human Screenome Project, four pathways in aging and a new DNA-based method to track animals – The Stanford Daily

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

Each week, The Dailys Science & Tech section produces a roundup of the most exciting and influential research happening on campus or otherwise related to Stanford. Heres our digest for the week of Jan.

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Free "LabXchange" Science Education Accelerator Launched By Amgen Foundation And Harvard’s Faculty Of Arts And Sciences – Yahoo Finance

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

LabXchange by Amgen Foundation and Harvard's Faculty of Arts and Sciences Reimagines the Science Experience for Students around the Globe Purpose-Built to Address Educational Barriers With Personalized Instruction Virtual Lab Simulations Help Students Develop the Science Skills Needed to Solve Tomorrow's Challenges THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. and CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --The Amgen Foundation and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University (Harvard FAS)today announced the global launch of LabXchange, a free online science education platform that provides users with access to personalized instruction, virtual lab experiences and networking opportunities across the global scientific community

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People on the Move – News – Wilkes-Barre Citizens Voice

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

FRANTZ PNC Bank AARON NIVERT Howard Gardner AARON NIVERT Howard Gardner AARON NIVERT Howard Gardner Allied Services Integrated Health System The health system recently welcomed four new board members.

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2020 U.K. Molecular Diagnostics Market: Sales and Market Shares of Major Suppliers, and Profiles of Current and Emerging Companies – Yahoo Finance

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

This unique report provides UK sales and market share estimates for major suppliers of molecular diagnostic products.

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Walking Sharks Are the Newest Branch of the Shark Family Tree – VICE

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

There is an entire cinematic subculture devoted to sharks that find ingenious ways to travel on land, be it via sharknado, genetic hybridization, or occult forces. Meanwhile, in the real world, there actually is a family of sharks that have evolved to walk on land, though they are much smaller, cuter, and less ravenous for human flesh than their counterparts on film. These walking sharks belong to the Hemiscyllium family, which is the newest lineage of sharks on Earth, according to a study published on Monday in the journal Marine and Freshwater Research.

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A 13-Year-Old Gave An Emotional Speech About His Dad Who Died In The Iran Plane Crash – BuzzFeed News

Monday, January 20th, 2020

Just over a week ago, 13-year-old Ryan Pourjam's father, Mansour Pourjam, died in a plane crash after Iran's government shot down the jet just outside Tehran. All 176 passengers were killed.

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Drugs from nature: Researchers from U of T, Japan mine microbial compound library for new therapeutics – News@UofT

Monday, January 20th, 2020

Charles Boone first set foot in Japan fresh out of undergrad in 1983 when he lived and worked with a local family on a rice farm in Chiba prefecture, just outside Tokyo. There, he fell in love with many things Japanese not least its cuisine, which owes much of its flavourto fermenting microorganisms. Now, years later, the microbes would lure Boone back to Japan, albeit for a different reason

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Scientist Who Discovered BRCA1 Gene to Give Free Talk on Cancer And Genetics – Noozhawk

Monday, January 20th, 2020

By Caitlin O'Hara for UCSB Arts & Lectures | January 15, 2020 | 9:00 a.m. UCSB Arts & Lectures and the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara co-present Understanding Genetics and Cancer, a free community event featuring Mary-Claire King, the scientist who discovered the BRCA1 gene,7:30 p.m. Thurs., Feb.

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Genetic risk markers and misrepresentation – The Medium

Monday, January 20th, 2020

The Medium recently had the chance to sit down with Dr. EstebanParra, a molecular anthropologist and anthropology professor at the Universityof Toronto Mississauga (UTM). Parra has hada long and far-reaching journey in science which began in one of the oldestuniversities in Spain, the University of Santiago de Compostela.

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Early Research Suggests Antibiotics May Be Effective in One Form of Dementia – MedicalResearch.com

Monday, January 20th, 2020

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Haining Zhu, PhDDepartment of Molecular and Cellular BiochemistryUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Response: Frontotemporal dementia is the most common type of early onset dementia impacting people between ages 40 and 65. It affects the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain, which leads to behavior and personality changes, difficulty speaking and writing, and eventual memory deterioration.

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Global Lung Cancer Diagnostics Market – Poised to Reach Over US$1.6 Billion by 2025 – ResearchAndMarkets.com – Business Wire

Monday, January 20th, 2020

DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The "Lung Cancer Diagnostics - Market Analysis, Trends, and Forecasts" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. The Lung Cancer Diagnostics market worldwide is projected to grow by US$1.3 Billion, driven by a compounded growth of 8%

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Why Cant Bertrand Might Cry? Missing Water Channels Could Be the Answer – Technology Networks

Monday, January 20th, 2020

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency--a rare disorder first described in 2012--lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder's wide-ranging symptoms--including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays--and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder. "Our findings uncover a new and completely unexpected 'job' for NGLY1, which was originally thought to only cleave sugars from proteins," says Hudson Freeze, Ph.D., director and professor of the Human Genetics Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys and senior author of the study

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Son of Iran crash victim says father ‘stood strong’ – CBC.ca

Monday, January 20th, 2020

MansourPourjam's son Ryan says his father always strived to be positive. "I can't remember a single moment in my life where Mansour, my dad, had any trace of negativity in his voice or actions," the 13-year-old boy told a crowd of mourners Wednesday at Carleton University.

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The biology of coffee, the world’s most popular drink – EconoTimes

Monday, January 20th, 2020

Youre reading this with a cup of coffee in your hand, arent you? Coffee is the most popular drink in the world. Americans drink more coffee than soda, juice and tea combined

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11 Year-Old Bertrand Might Cant Cry Scientists Have Now Discovered Why – SciTechDaily

Monday, January 20th, 2020

11-year-old Bertrand Might (center) surrounded by his family, including his father, Matt Might (second from right), and his mother, Cristina Might (second from left). Credit: The Might family Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency a rare disorder first described in 2012 lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorders wide-ranging symptoms including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder.

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Science Talk – Tell me more about telomeres: how ‘basic’ science can help us treat cancer – The Institute of Cancer Research

Monday, January 20th, 2020

Image: Chromosomes and their telomeres (visualised in red). Credit: Thomas Ried, NCI Center for Cancer Research You might not have heard of telomeres but theyre incredibly important they are the caps that protect the end of chromosomes. They work like the plastic tips that stop your shoelaces from fraying.

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Nature Reviews Genetics Pseudogene Function Is Prematurely Dismissed – Discovery Institute

Wednesday, January 8th, 2020

A new paper in Nature Reviews Genetics, Overcoming challenges and dogmas to understand the functions of pseudogenes, is simply incredible. It documents not only that pseudogenes have been found to have widespread function but also that under current dogma in biology, and given the technical limitations, we are failing to recognize their functions. As Seth W.

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Six City Honors grads in Jacobs School Class of 2023 – UB Now: News and views for UB faculty and staff – University at Buffalo Reporter

Wednesday, January 8th, 2020

They spent their middle school and high school years with a firsthand view of the development of the burgeoning Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, including the sparkling new downtown building that houses the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Now, amazingly, six graduates of City Honors School find themselves in the Class of 2023 at the Jacobs School.

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